CEO Andy Palmer wary that new regulations won't end F1's spending war

Aston Martin is on the brink of canning its ambitions to make engines for Formula 1, with new regulations set to move away from the cost-controlled formula originally proposed by F1 rule makers.

Although a final decision on the new regulations, which are expected to come into effect from 2021, is not expected to be announced until this weekend’s Austrian Grand Prix, Aston boss Andy Palmer told Autocar: “It doesn’t look like the new regulations will be of interest, sadly.

“Aston was interested on the basis that costs would be controlled and that the formula would be one part of an equation that would put control back into the hands of the driver. I don’t see the costs coming down far enough with the regulations I’ve heard discussed and I do see that the opportunity to spend a fortune chasing down a tenth of a second a lap will remain.

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“At Aston, we love the sport, and we’d love to be involved, but we cannot get involved in an arms race. It’s needlessly expensive and it undermines the sport, because whoever has the advantage of that tenth will win. I won’t say we’re definitely not going to do it until I see the final proposal because there are still some areas where there is not enough clarity. But if the door is left open to a spending war, then we won’t be involved.”

In October last year, the F1 governing body and teams announced the new regulations, but wranglings over the details have ensued since. The basic premise is that cars will be powered by turbocharged 1.6-litre V6 units with heavily mandated designs, including the removal or standardisation of some of the costly electrical and energy storage systems.

At the time, Aston announced that it was working with former Ferrari engine chief Luca Marmorini as a consultant on a possible engine project.

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Palmer did confirm that Aston’s commitment to F1, currently as a sponsor of the Red Bull team, is long term and not influenced by the team’s switch to Honda power from next season.

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10

29 June 2018

Not!! Nothing more than publicity stunt 

29 June 2018

Spending all of Aston's profits on F1 just to keep Dietrich Mateschitz's toys running is folly.   The billionaire has two teams; if he's ever feeling poor he can always sell one of them!

 

All that's happening is that the F1 viewer, and let's be honest you have to be fairly dedicated to watch the borefests that Grand Prixs have become, are not fooled by Aston's involvement. They know it's a Renault engine.   They know it's already badged as Tag Heuer.   And they know that's just as ridiculous as pretending that Aston contributes to Red Bull when they have Adrian Newey.

 

All Palmer is doing is making Aston Martin a laughing stock.   There's no value add for the brand.

 

Now, if Aston instead found something else to associate their brand with, wouldn't that be better?   Something that highlighted they're luxury sports cars instead?

 

29 June 2018

Crazy that Aston Martin would even consider entering F1 as an engine supplier, while at the same time buying in engines from AMG for many of their road cars

29 June 2018

They don't make the engine in the Red Bull cars now, despite the badging and buy in engines for their road cars. You need lots of money for F1 and Aston don't have enough of it.

29 June 2018

 Andy Palmer is right, if it still isn’t cheaper to take part in F1 or any Sport for that matter, your only going to have the two or three that can and that will be boring, look at F1 just now, only really two teams in it, ok three at a push, but Redbulls haven’t got the power in there current Engine so they’re going with Honda and they can only do that because they have good backers, the rest are also rams, there to make up the numbers, I mean, would you pay to see two Cars race?, no, a reduction in how much you need to go racing in F1 so that more teams can come closer to being competitive, but what happens then?, the big teams start to say it isn’t worth it, Ferrari chucks it Rattle and threatens to walk, back to square one....again!

29 June 2018

Build your own V8 again (they still make their V12) before you even consider building an F1 engine. Marketing without credibility underlying it is utter crap, which is what the current F1 "involvement" is. The engine is a Renault that's badged a TAG Heuer (which is also absurd). Aston, you've made wonderful engines. Buying in AMG engines (that they're great engines is irrelevant) is an utter travesty.

29 June 2018
Speedraser wrote:

Build your own V8 again (they still make their V12) before you even consider building an F1 engine. Marketing without credibility underlying it is utter crap, which is what the current F1 "involvement" is. The engine is a Renault that's badged a TAG Heuer (which is also absurd). Aston, you've made wonderful engines. Buying in AMG engines (that they're great engines is irrelevant) is an utter travesty.

The V12 is derived from the previous V12 and that is an engine which used Ford knowledge.   It's built at a Ford plant in Germany too.   Yes, it is a unique engine to Aston, but it's also one made by Ford.   However, being built by Ford is no bad thing.   They'll have processes and controls that Aston could only dream of.   It's better to be part of something big when you're casting engine blocks!

 

Next, yes, the crate engine from AMG.   Yes, I wish they'd done something to make it unique to Aston.   At least to give the illusion that Aston has some engine design abilities!

 

And the F1 program...   Yes, totally agree it is absurd.   Wasting Aston's profits on Dietrich Mateschitz's toy cars.   You'd have thought a billionaire with two F1 teams wouldn't need the pocket change from Aston!

30 June 2018

A good decision.

 

I can't understand why any manufacturer wants to be associated with these appalling 1.6 turbo vacuum cleaners.  It is even more ridiculous that Mercedes thought it was a good idea to put one in a road car.  

 

They may be fast and powerful, but they will never ever be cool.

30 June 2018
Aston never really wanted to race in F1, they neither have the technical or financial resources to make it happen. This was simply fake news to give the ailing manufacturer some media mileage.

3 July 2018

..The basic premise of F1 thankfully has not changed, there are other "cheaper sports" that companies (like aston martin) can have a go at entering what's wrong with developing engines (or entire cars like ferrari) for other racing formulae or sports car racing?...what's wrong is that they are not as high profile as F1

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