Currently reading: Segway boss dies riding Segway
The boss of the Segway two-wheeler has been killed in an accident while riding a Segway
Autocar
News
1 min read
27 September 2010

The boss of Segway has died after a freak accident that saw him ride one of his machines off a cliff.

Jimi Heselden was riding a more rugged country version of the electric two-wheeler around his North Yorkshire estate yesterday when he lost control, falling over a cliff and into the River Wharfe below.

A spokesman for West Yorkshire Police said today: "Police were called at 11.40am yesterday to reports of a man in the River Wharfe, apparently having fallen from the cliffs above.

"A Segway-style vehicle was recovered. He was pronounced dead at the scene. At this time we do not believe the death to be suspicious."

Heselden acquired Segway last year made his money from defence contracts and was worth £166 million, according to the Sunday Times Rich List.

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Los Angeles 29 September 2010

Re: Segway boss dies riding Segway

Dan McNeil v2 wrote:
The issue as I see it is that these who take the view that the amusing comment are disrespectful etc. feel that the people making amusing comments are somehow morally inferior,

Eh, no, tactless certainly, crass perhaps because they parade their private feelings in public where relatives of the dead can read them or be told of them. There's a length of time that has to elapse before such matters can be recalled with some degree of humour. How long that is I don't know, but I do know it isn't on announcement of the person's death.
Dan McNeil v2 29 September 2010

Re: Segway boss dies riding Segway

MrTrilby wrote:
I appreciate a great number of the posts you make,
Likewise.
MrTrilby wrote:
but right now, you sound to me like a spoilt child whining about why he's special and shouldn't have to show consideration for the feelings of others.

Mr Trilby - if you read this thread fully, you'll note that some people made what I personally would consider as lighthearted and amusing comments. Others take a different view, as can be seen. And, at no point have I said that I shouldn't have to show consideration for the feelings of others. I merely implied that expecting me to show 'respect' for dead people who I don't know is, in my opinion, utterly ludicrous. Semantics...

The issue as I see it is that these who take the view that the amusing comment are disrespectful etc. feel that the people making amusing comments are somehow morally inferior, should cease forthwith, and follow their particular line (for example, The Special One's comments above).

I actually hold no strong views either way on Mr Segway (as I think my posts make pretty clear). What I do have an issue with is people suggesting that their ethics and morals are the ones that are correct, and that these who don't hold these ethical and moral views really ought to comply. My earlier post was a perfectly reasonably and well-argued counterpoint (to the simplistic and frankly provincial view of some on this thread) that ethics and morals are not 'fixed', and that there are many cultures around that would hold a very different view on issues of life, death and the celebration of both.

Far from whining, I can assure you I'm extremely clear-headed and utterly objective on this. And that does seem to be a problem for some people: when they can't respond to an intelligent and well-argued point, they resort to inane name-calling.

Los Angeles 29 September 2010

Re: Segway boss dies riding Segway

I'm sure the tragic Mr. Heselden wasn't chortling as he fell over the cliff to his death, greatly amused, the irony of it uppermost in his mind. We can safely assume his relatives, friends and admirers are not amused either.

One notable who survived a similar fate was the philosopher and mathematician, Betrand Russell, rescued from the sea when the light plane he was travelling in to Oslo and the university as a guest lecturer crashed. On his return to the UK he was crowded at the airport by reporters enthusiastic to hear of his mishap.

"When you were in the sea what ran through your mind, sir? Did you think of logical empiricism or logical positivism?" they asked eagerly.

"No." he answered. "I thought the water was bloody cold, and I was going to die!"

That snippet of reality might be a good moment to lock the thread.

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