Who bought new cars; where they cleaner?; how old were they?
1 April 2010

Scrappage had ended, and the government has released figures on its impact.

The £2000 grant to scrap an old car in exchange for a new one was funded between the car manufacturer who was selling the car and the government.

Lord Mandelson, business secretary, said: “The scheme was always time limited and today as it closes I am pleased to see scrappage has delivered the results we aimed for – not just for manufacturers, but for the whole industry and its supply chain."

Scrappage facts released by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills include:- Scrappage accounted for approximately 20 per cent of all new car registrations during the period it ran.- 54 per cent of scrappage buyers surveyed had never bought a new car before- 56 per cent of surveyed buyers said they would not have bought any vehicle if the scrappage scheme had not been introduced - Cars bought through scrappage had average CO2 emissions of 133g/km – 27 per cent lower than the average CO2 of scrapped cars- The average age of cars scrapped under the scheme is just over 13 years - 90 per cent of all cars scrapped in the scheme were between 10 and 16 years old- Government data estimates that there may have been as many as 4000 jobs supported by the scheme at manufacturers and suppliers across UK- Of those surveyed 6 per cent of car owners who bought a new vehicle under the scheme were over 60 years old

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21

1 April 2010

I'd love to know how many hyundai i10's were sold during the scheme. I see loads of them driving around and would love to ask the drivers what they threw away for such an amazing car... bet it would have been a mint low mileage mk2 golf or merc w123 or other far far better car.....

1 April 2010

[quote icecreamwala]I'd love to know how many hyundai i10's were sold during the scheme[/quote]

I don't know how many i10s were sold through scrappage, but Hyundai sold a total of 38,822 vehicles through the scheme up until the end of February - which means they'll have smashed the 40k barrier by the time the scheme finished at the end of March. I can only assume that a very large proprtion of that 40k consisted of i10 sales.

This makes Hyundai easily the most successful scrappage beneficiary, especially once you add the 26,424 Kias sold through scrappage up until the end of Feb.

Hope this helps?

1 April 2010

I know now its finished they are going to decare it a success. But how useful to the UK economy was it to support the Korean car industry?

How many mechanics who previously looked after these older cars now scrapped will lose out without the trade, both now and in the years ahead while the new car owners are taking them for main dealer servicing?

The same must go for the parts industry?

Is it really a good thing that the older cars, often the ones the young can afford are scrapped rather than being someones first car?

How do they know the CO2 out put of the cars scrapped. most will never have been through an official test. It must just be a made up number.

At least the scheme has finished. I hope no future government tries anything as daft again

1 April 2010

[quote icecreamwala]would love to ask the drivers what they threw away for such an amazing car... bet it would have been a mint low mileage mk2 golf or merc w123 or other far far better car[/quote] What world are you living on? Far more likely to be a 96 Escort 1.3 (old kent engine) that was rust riddled, unsafe and belching out far more localised pollution than a brand new i10 ever will. I would expect the vast majority of scrappage scheme vehicles will have been borderline MOT passes and by using the scrappage scheme the owners have been able to afford a new, safe car on finance with the £2k+ providing their deposit, as opposed to ending up at one of those "we finance anyone" places with 29% apr finance and cars that are dead long before you've finished paying for them.

1 April 2010

[quote artill]How do they know the CO2 out put of the cars scrapped. most will never have been through an official test. It must just be a made up number.[/quote] You can get a very good figure for CO2 just by looking at the fuel economy. You can work out within 5g/km the CO2 emissions of any car based on the fuel type and the combined fuel economy figure.

1 April 2010

I see your still using the Focus picture which was proved to not have been a scrappage car by a forum member

1 April 2010

[quote theonlydt]You can work out within 5g/km the CO2 emissions of any car based on the fuel type and the combined fuel economy figure.[/quote]

My point is that combined economy figures havent been around that long.

Truth is they dont know. so they made something up that made the scheme look green. it wasnt.

1 April 2010

[quote artill]My point is that combined economy figures havent been around that long.[/quote] Yes they have. They are figures available for most cars available from at least 1991. That's 19 years - the article states that over 90% of the vehicles scrapped were between 10 and 16 years old - therefore combined fuel economy figures would be available for those.

1 April 2010

[quote artill] But how useful to the UK economy was it to support the Korean car industry?[/quote]

there's a clue here:

[quote Autocar]Government data estimates that there may have been as many as 4000 jobs supported by the scheme [/quote]

so that's £400m of taxpyers' money spent to "support" 4,000 jobs, or £100k per job. It would have been cheaper to the British taxpayer to have forgone Scrappage and have paid these 4,000 unemployment benefit of around £200/week for the next ten years. Never mind though, it's not real money, just printed.

To see how this govt. has impoverished the average motorist and citizen in UK one just needs to look at latest available pan-European data on wage levels. Britain has petrol and diesel prices at or above most of the main European nations, yet its hourly wage levels are up to 50% below these nations. This means that the affordability of these high fuel prices is much worse for the average UK person than for the average French, German, Italian and so on person. The data is:

UK average hourly earnings(2009): 22 euros (down 10% between 2008/9, mainly due to pound's devaluation)

France: 33 euros (up 1%)

Germany: 31 euros (up 4%); manufacturing sector: 36 euros (up 6%)

Holland: 31 euros (up 2%)

Italy: 26 euros (zero change)

full table here: http://www.destatis.de/jetspeed/portal/cms/Sites/destatis/Internet/DE/Presse/pm/2010/03/PD10__122__624,templateId=renderPrint.psml

1 April 2010

[quote nicksheele]

UK average hourly earnings(2009): 22 euros (down 10% between 2008/9, mainly due to pound's devaluation)

France: 33 euros (up 1%)

Germany: 31 euros (up 4%); manufacturing sector: 36 euros (up 6%)

Holland: 31 euros (up 2%)

Italy: 26 euros (zero change)

[/quote] Thanks - interesting comparison. Unfortunately it's really difficult to get a full comparison, because where the UK makes money on fuel duty another country may make that tax revenue from another source. An example would be France where they have a 74% income tax top rate (compared to the new 50% top rate here, add on 8-11% national insurance). France also has a "wealth" tax.

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