Currently reading: Scrappage facts released
Who bought new cars; where they cleaner?; how old were they?
Autocar
News
1 min read
1 April 2010

Scrappage had ended, and the government has released figures on its impact.

The £2000 grant to scrap an old car in exchange for a new one was funded between the car manufacturer who was selling the car and the government.

Lord Mandelson, business secretary, said: “The scheme was always time limited and today as it closes I am pleased to see scrappage has delivered the results we aimed for – not just for manufacturers, but for the whole industry and its supply chain."

Scrappage facts released by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills include:- Scrappage accounted for approximately 20 per cent of all new car registrations during the period it ran.- 54 per cent of scrappage buyers surveyed had never bought a new car before- 56 per cent of surveyed buyers said they would not have bought any vehicle if the scrappage scheme had not been introduced - Cars bought through scrappage had average CO2 emissions of 133g/km – 27 per cent lower than the average CO2 of scrapped cars- The average age of cars scrapped under the scheme is just over 13 years - 90 per cent of all cars scrapped in the scheme were between 10 and 16 years old- Government data estimates that there may have been as many as 4000 jobs supported by the scheme at manufacturers and suppliers across UK- Of those surveyed 6 per cent of car owners who bought a new vehicle under the scheme were over 60 years old

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pentoman 2 April 2010

Re: Scrappage facts released

theonlydt wrote:
What world are you living on? Far more likely to be a 96 Escort 1.3 (old kent engine) that was rust riddled, unsafe and belching out far more localised pollution than a brand new i10 ever will. I would expect the vast majority of scrappage scheme vehicles will have been borderline MOT passes and by using the scrappage scheme the owners have been able to afford a new, safe car on finance with the £2k+ providing their deposit, as opposed to ending up at one of those "we finance anyone" places with 29% apr finance and cars that are dead long before you've finished paying for them.
Hmm not sure what world you're living on! I don't think it'll be mint W123s, but it won't be barely-roadworthy Escorts either. Noone that's crawling around in £150 of Escort that can barely afford to keep it roadworthy is going to be able to afford (or inclined to buy) £7k+ for a new car are they?? Discount or no discount. The scappage customers are going to be people that can A) afford a brand new car and B) have a current car worth noteably less than £2k. The typical person in this situation probably bought their existing car from new or nearly new, and most likely they will have looked after it quite well. If they can afford a new car they can afford to maintain their existing one, so I don't think it will be a total unroadworthy banger that they are scrapping. They will still be being driven around uninsured and untaxes ;). So I think a lot of scrappage cars are quite nice motors with lots of life left in them.

John McToon 1 April 2010

Re: Scrappage facts released

So is this where we see another crash in car buying like early last year?

theonlydt 1 April 2010

Re: Scrappage facts released

troggy wrote:
It goes back to the argument that through the whole life cycle from production to scrapping and projected life a Land Rover produced less CO2 than a Prius!!!!
Unfortunately disproved quite conclusively now. 70% of a vehicles emissions are fuel used during its life (average vehicle, something like a Rolls Royce that'll do 15,000 miles in its lifetime is different, as is a commercial vehicle where it'll do 400k+). The other thing you need to remember is that new cars are about 95% recoverable/recyclable. Therefore when they are replaced at the end of their life there is far less embedded energy.

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