South Yorkshire Police will fit sensors to its fleet to reduce accident bill
4 September 2010

South Yorkshire Police will fit all of its vehicles with parking sensors to reduce the amount of money spent fixing the damage to it cars caused by low-speed accidents.

The force spends an average of £60,000 a year mending cars that that have been damaged while being parked. Pricing for the new sensors has not been released.

Martin Whysall, South Yorkshire Police’s fleet manager, said, "Police station yards were not necessarily designed for cars and they can be tight in terms of space."

Police forces across the country spend significant amounts on fixing damaged cars.

In the year until April 2010, Merseyside Police spent £205,403 on repairing crashed cars.

Humberside Police buys cars with reversing sensors as standard, whereas North and West Yorkshire police already add parking sensors to the larger vehicles in their fleets.

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Comments
12

4 September 2010

Shame the police dont think it would just be best if you were able to drive before being let out in a police car. Or maybe just get the culprits to pay out of their wages. i bet that would reduce the number of incidents

4 September 2010

And yet they can pull you over and give you points for not driving correctly. If you can't park then you can't drive.

4 September 2010

Loved the piece in todays' paper about the two plod who stopped a drunk in an Evo. After he was carted away they took the Evo for a spin. Don't know who pays for the damage they did .( Evo and back gardens)

4 September 2010

Many years ago, I was fortunate enough to be in a car with Thames Valley traffic police (no, I hadn't been arrested...) At the time, the driver was called to an emergency incident and I witnessed some of the best driving of my life, reaching speeds of 130mph in complete safety on dual carriageways. A call subsequently came over the radio stating that the emergency had been dealt with, so the officer took me back to the station where, whilst parking at 2mph he crashed into the station wall. An amused colleague came out to hand the driver an accident report form. Fortunately, there was no damage to the police car or the police station - just the officer's pride.


5 September 2010

[quote artill]Shame the police dont think it would just be best if you were able to drive before being let out in a police car.[/quote] Early this morning I popped out to the front of the house to put the re-cycling boxes away after the dustbin men had left them scattered all over the footpath and front garden and noticed a police car parked a couple of doors down. The driver had left it with the front nearside wheel up tight against the kerb and the back about two feet away from the kerb. As I was picking up the boxes the officer (late 20s, considerably over-weight and didn't look as if he could walk the regulation distance, never mind run it) appeared from the driveway of the house he had been visiting and got in the car. He'd barely shut the door before he'd started the engine, revved it up and mounted the kerb before driving off without his seatbelt on. He drove a few yards down the road, passing me, before doing a sudden u-turn in the junction of the next side-road driving up over both kerbs before heading off in the direction from which he had obviously previously come, still without a seatbelt on, one hand on the wheel and his radio/mobile in the other. I'm pretty sure I know how he'd have reacted had I been driving like that and he had been standing on the pavement watching. Talk about "do as I say, not as I do".............


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

5 September 2010

Martin Whysall, South Yorkshire Police’s fleet manager....

Here's an idea to cut the incidents of car park collisions by dopey coppers Martin...

Put them back on the beat, they should not be driving if their level of spatial awareness is so crap, especially after all the expense the tax paying Monkeys have invested in his career skills to date.

Its shameful.....

PS:...... have you got any promotional fridge magnets or pens left?

5 September 2010

Locknload66 is spot on. The poor standards of police driving annoys me immensely. It's a shame the senior ranks don't have the appetite to do anything about it.

The comments section needs a makeover... how about a forum??

5 September 2010

Most of my local police don't park at all, they cruise around with their sunglasses on checking out the local ladies in their summer time clobber. When they want to stop they just dump the car either in the middle of the road or on the pavement.

A brilliant example to us all!!

5 September 2010

This is like the letters page of The Mail.

Where has all Japanese design went to?

5 September 2010

[quote MattDB]

When they want to stop they just dump the car either in the middle of the road or on the pavement.

A brilliant example to us all!!

[/quote] I've noticed that too. As for parking sensors, I think it's a good idea. If Police Officers are regularly switching cars, knowing exactly where the corners of the car are can be tricky and mistakes can happen, especially when the rear visibility in modern cars is so poor.

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