The Norfolk constabulary denies leaked memo encouraged inaccurate recording of car crime stats
7 May 2008

Norfolk constabulary has denied that a leaked memo encouraged the inaccurate recording of car crime statistices to meet government targets.The document urged officers not always to record smashed car windows as criminal damage. “We appear to be making things difficult for ourselves by “criming” things that aren't actually crimes,” it read. “One example is where a car window is found to be damaged, no entry to the vehicle, no witnesses and no idea how it happened.” “If there is no evidence of someone intending to destroy or being reckless then there is no crime.'Deputy chief constable Ian Learmonth denied that the crime figures were being manipulated to fit government targets, and described the internal memo as “clumsy but well intentioned”.The leaked document is thought to be indicative of a wider police policy on car crime and vandalism, which has angered rank-and-file officers. The whistleblower said: "This is just one example of what's going on to try to screen out crimes. What's worse is that if they are not going to record it, it's not going to show the true picture of what's going on in an area."Official figures for 2006/7 reveal that criminal damage accounted for one in five of the 5.4 million crimes recorded in England and Wales.

Will Powell

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7 May 2008

It seems to me that we have a generation of senior police officers who have been allowed to get to very senior levels within their respective forces (not "service", I believe that has the wrong connotations) who are academics and not practical police officers. Most of them appear to have a political agenda (hence their reference to the Police Force as a service) and seem intent on achieving targets set by their political masters rather than doing proper policing as needed by the public. It needs more rank and file officers to expose these working methods, though I suspect they may risk being the subject of witchhunts and slurs upon their abilities and possible expulsion from the force when found.


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

7 May 2008

"Hello Police?"

"Yes how can we help?"

"I have found a dead bloodied man on the street"

"Ok, any witnesses"

"No, I don't think so"

"Ahhh sorry no crime committed here then, thanks for your call though"

7 May 2008

A bit exaggerated, but absolutely true. I have a friend in the police force and some of the stuff he's told me is shocking. Even the Police force is now just a business - they have to hit targets like a sales person, so they behave in a way so as to appear successful - keep their masters off their backs. Sad world.

7 May 2008

We've had a doubling of officers in my area over tha past 5 or 6 years. In the past year crime, like everywhere in the world, is in steep decline. Here overall crime has dropped approx 30%.

But despite the doubling of officers the detection rate (solving crime) is still a very poor 1 in 3. I'm not sure if the discrepency of having more manpower but less success is due to more paperwork for officers or a lower IQ and the 'dumbing down' of the force!!

7 May 2008

Society gets the police it deserves, and society is shite.

7 May 2008

[quote 230SL]

Society gets the police it deserves, and society is shite.

[/quote]Was quoting a policeman I forgot to put, I think it would be fairer to say society reflects the police, and society is shite.

7 May 2008

[quote JJBoxster]In the past year crime, like everywhere in the world, is in steep decline. [/quote]

I reckon most Somalians would disagree with that. Ho ho.

8 May 2008

[quote James Read]I reckon most Somalians would disagree with that. Ho ho.[/quote]

On the other hand most Zimbabweians would agree else they will get a beating.

8 May 2008

Given that all the police in Norfolk have to worry about is smashed windows and sheep worrying, I can't blame them for taking up an opprtunity to slash crime by 50%.

8 May 2008

[quote The Colonel]

Given that all the police in Norfolk have to worry about is smashed windows and sheep worrying, I can't blame them for taking up an opprtunity to slash crime by 50%.

[/quote]

Is that in addition to policing ports of entry - community policing - OCG policing - road policing - emergency management - firearms policing - drugs policing - illegal immigration enforcement work - town centre policing - rural policing - engagement work - intelligence work etc etc etc?

Is there a consensus then that not one of you would actually call the police should you find yourself in a situation that warranted it?

And unless you've had direct experience of this - it's not acceptable to whine that they probably would not turn out anyway.

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