Speed camera catches 5500 motorists in five weeks - and it's still got a fortnight to run
11 March 2010

A speed camera installed during roadworks on the M6 has caught more than 5500 speeding motorists in just five weeks.

The camera, sited between junctions 43 and 44 of the M6 Carlisle and installed to protect workers during road repairs, is said to have brought in over £160,000 in fines so far - and it still has another two weeks to run.

Kevin Tea, manager of Cumbria Safety Cameras, said, "In seven years working on the safety partnership in Cumbria, never have I seen a camera generate so many tickets.

"I can't offer an explanation for it. I can't understand why people haven't seen the signs and are continuing to speed."

Only those motorists who were caught at more than 60mph in the 50mph zone are likely to be fined - but that could still mean almost 3000 motorists facing penalties.

Clare Armstrong from anti-speed camera group Safe Speed said, "We're pretty disgusted. It's obviously got nothing to do with road safety.

"The fact that it's raising so much revenue will add to the police/public divide and continue to make people believe it's just about making money. You don't measure safe driving in miles per hour."

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Comments
112

11 March 2010

"You don't measure safe driving in miles per hour"

So true, and especialy relevant on motorways. Why can't the government see this!

11 March 2010

Caught more than 5500 motorists and I bet there wasnt a single accident - if thats not revenue raising what is. What is this country coming to?

11 March 2010

Whilst I can sympathise with the sentiment that these cameras are only there for revenue purposes I can't agree with the fact that just because there were no accidents it would be OK to speed here. There is clearly no secret of where the cameras are so just slow down.

11 March 2010

[quote JoeF]

"You don't measure safe driving in miles per hour"

So true, and especialy relevant on motorways. Why can't the government see this!

[/quote]

What happens when you combine speed with some idiot who is not looking in his mirrors?

Actually, why don't we adopt one over-riding rule. Similar to skiing: give way to whoever's in front. While skiing you don't have any time to look behind and I'm sure we drive our cars faster than we would ski.

11 March 2010

I agree that a lot of cameras are just revenue raising excersies, but in these cases they are there for a reason.

There have been roadworkers killed because of excess speed for the conditions coming in to roadworks where traffic is slower and the lanes are often narrow.

That's the reason the camera is there, to protect them, and us in a confined traffic environment.

We all know the cameras are there, it is clealy signposted, anyone who gets caught in a roadworks with an average speed camera has only themselves to blame.

11 March 2010

I'm sure I can't be alone in not minding speeding cameras being used in this manner. While taking a picture of a driver and sending him a letter isn't 'protecting' anyone, the threat of punishment is often the only way to enforce the law and you have to assume that most people will stick to the limit.

What I loathe is speed cameras being peppered around town at so called blackspots - every single one of the myriad GATSOs within a 20 mile radius of my home is installed on one side of the road only, rather than in a pair, thus making a nonsense the whole 'protection' sell. Nobody has ever provided a satisfactory answer to the question why these devices often gaze at just one direction of traffic when there are two directions of flow.

It's become commonplace to see northbound vehicles jumping on their brakes for the 100 yards they're 'in shot' while southbound cars zoom the other way regardless. It's a blackspot alright - it's become harder to cross the road because it's harder to judge the correct speed of oncoming cars and particularly at night!

11 March 2010

[quote Richard H]

That's the reason the camera is there, to protect them, and us in a confined traffic environment.

We all know the cameras are there, it is clealy signposted, anyone who gets caught in a roadworks with an average speed camera has only themselves to blame.

[/quote]Absolutely - why can only a few realise this? So often I have seen the vast majority of motorists breaking speed limits through roadworks, so cameras are the only way to force these irresponsible idiots to toe the line or get punished. That daft Clare Armstrong may well be disgusted, but I am more disgusted by her making such a fatuous remark when it's road workers' safety at stake. She should be gagged until she can find something sensible to say.

11 March 2010

[quote ThwartedEfforts]installed on one side of the road only[/quote] We also have this but both sides of the road have the measurement lines so I've always assumed the single camera covers both lanes. I'm sure I've seen a speeding driver on the left get flashed by a camera on the right.

11 March 2010

That Claire Armstrong should be given the task of putting up the signs on the central reservation at night, last Sunday I overtook on the motorway I only to see a little dayglo green man crossing the road I slowed down as I could then see the yellow wagon, only to be overtaken by what I had just passed, the annoying thing about those speed cameras though is most of the time they were up there did n't seem to be much work taking place, I got that bored of it started driving up the A6 instead. Have also noticed in Cumbria the camera vans sometimes go out in pairs. ;o)

11 March 2010

In the course of my work I've sometimes been in motorway roadworks areas and I can tell you it's a scary place. The confined lanes etc mean there's little margin for error and no room for doziness on the part of the drivers.

I haven't been on that part of the M6 but I do wonder why so many people have been caught though. They can't all be so blind and stupid can they? Maybe the signs aren't all that obvious after all. Or maybe the layout invites drivers to speed.

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