Farmers and hauliers to protest against £1-a-litre fuel prices this Saturday
10 December 2007

Thousands of motorists are expected to gather their winter fuel early this Christmas after information was released on a network of countrywide fuel protests that will begin this Saturday December 16.Protest group Transaction 2007 is organising simultaneous protests at many of the UK fuel refineries and storage depots starting this weekend. The actions are intended to persuade the fuel industry to drop UK forecourt prices, and Chancellor Alistair Darling to cut the 50.35p of tax it currently generates on every litre of low sulphur petrol and diesel sold in this country. However, the more marked effect of these protests is likely to be on British motorists, who are expected to rush to forecourts in their thousands this week, in an attempt to fill up before the fallout.

The protesters

According to information on its website, Transaction 2007 is a protest group made up of hauliers and farmers aggrieved at the level of fuel duty they’re paying. It is, says the ‘site, what’s left of the group that organised blockades of fuel refineries and storage depots seven years ago, which caused nationwide problems with the supply of petrol and diesel.This year’s protests will be less severe: “it’s not our intention to bring the country to its knees as we did back in 2000,” the group says. The group is encouraging its members to “protest lawfully,” making their feelings known without disrupting the supply of fuel to and from the sites. However, even a limited disruption to supply, combined with the effect of panic buying from the public, could have a dramatic effect on the price and availability of fuel this Christmas.

Why this weekend?

The protests will come on what could be the busiest shopping day of 2007, just as many in the UK plan trips around the country over the Christmas break. Transaction 2007 claims the date was chosen “to enable those who would normally be working during the week to attend.” But why not wait until after the festive rush? When Autocar attempted to ask the question, no one was available at Transaction 2007 to explain.

Join the debate

Comments
9

11 December 2007

Under work smarter rather than harder, I am sure I read recently that BIODIESEL is duty free fuel (under 2500 litres pa), giving a total cost of about 20 pence / litre.

www.notafreemason.com

11 December 2007

These fuel protests are simply another form of terrorism. Making the lives of innocent motorists harder will not gain support. Whilst I agree that fuel prices are very high, this is mostly a result of rising oil prices, and only partly rising tax.

These protests are also dangerous. Would you be more concerned about a bomb exploding on your street, or not being able to rush a loved one to hospital because you have no fuel, and all the ambulances are having to respond to more people dialling 999 because they can't get to hosipital in their cars either.

Blocking fuel supplies will have a drastic effect on the country and no good will come of it. The government will not back down and ordinary motorists will become more angry with the protests as the effects starts to set in. Blocking oil refinaries is holding the country to ransom.

If protests do happen this Saturday I hope the government and the police will come down hard on all of the protesters.

11 December 2007

[quote Will86]If protests do happen this Saturday I hope the government and the police will come down hard on all of the protesters.[/quote]

I couldnt disagree more. Place a frog in boiling water and it will attempt to jump out. But place a frog in cold water and slowly warm it up and it will sit there until it dies. That is what is happening to this country. Every year, taxes go up, roads get more congested, conditions worsen. Until drastic action is taken the government will continue to suck as much money out the average motorist it can.

11 December 2007

[quote DradusContact]I couldnt disagree more. Place a frog in boiling water and it will attempt to jump out. But place a frog in cold water and slowly warm it up and it will sit there until it dies. That is what is happening to this country. Every year, taxes go up, roads get more congested, conditions worsen. Until drastic action is taken the government will continue to suck as much money out the average motorist it can.[/quote]

Like the analagy, and exactly right. Can't stand the lilley livered, yoghurt nitters approach 'will86' would prefer. The vast majority of road users are law abiding and where has this got us, we lie down and ask Gordon to tickle our stomachs. When is a govenrment elected by the voting public going to do something the public actually agree with?

Note. I did not vote for this lot, therefore I have a right to complain about them. Those of you who did, don't have this right!!!

12 December 2007

'Lilley Livered, yoghurt nitters'??? I hate high petrol prices like everyone else. I drive above average miles every year and fuel costs me a fortune, but I will not have my life disrupted by protesters when it is almost certain that no good would come of it. Protest by all means, but not in such a way as to criple the country. As I said in my last post, holding the country to ransom will not work.

Taxes are high on fuel, but the main reason the prices are going up is because of the demand for oil from China and India. Its supply and demand. There is little the government can do about this. The government should plough some of the money it receives from fuel duty to research new fuels so that we avoid this situation in the future.

Think back to the protests a few years ago. Based on the fact that we are paying more than £1 a litre, did those protests really make a difference? If the government cut taxes on fuel, where would the new hidden taxes appear? Lets face it this government gives with one hand and takes with the other. A cut in fuel duty would simple be replaced with a raise somewhere else. I guess that would give you all something different to protest about.

12 December 2007

[quote Will86]Taxes are high on fuel, but the main reason the prices are going up is because of the demand for oil from China and India.[/quote]

I agree this guy must work for the governenment. Nobody could honestly think prices going up are anything but more government rip-offs.

13 December 2007

[quote Vicky Parrott]

I'm all for the protests. At the end of the day we pay so much money to use our roads and we see very little of it put back into improving the network. The government has proved to the public that signing a petition means nothing, so what other option have they left us?

[/quote]

Exactly.

However, protests have to be sustained in order to force the government to act.

13 December 2007

The only example of this working that I can think of is the Poll Tax. That was an unfair tax based around a mistaken hypothesis - the petrol issue is totally different.

It is a combination of factors both national and international - I would ask you to consider that while our esteemed representatives insist on fighting a war thousands of miles away on two fronts, the cost of fuel will continue to rise in order to fill the shortfall in treasury coffers that operations continue to cost.

You only have to look around you to smell the coffee in terms of money trying to be saved and collected - no backdated rises for public servants - shortfalls in equipment for soldiers - postcode lotteries in hospitals - English/Scottish postcode lotteries in education etc.

The questions we need to ask ourselves are somewhat more fundamental then the simple arguments posed by the hauliers. We,as a popultion, need to consider whether we are prepared to say enough is enough, we need to be prepared to say, on mass, that we cannot go to work, that we cannot go shopping, that we cannot pay our mortgages, that we cannot service our debts.

And we won't, which makes the whole notion of the protest somewhat tribal and representative of a minority section of road users, namely the truckers. If the 'powers that be' can marginalise the truckers on that basis, and they will, then the truckers are fighting a lost cause, the government will come in and divide and conquer. This protest will go that way.

Waste of time and effort.

In as much as I want a number of things to happen in this country on any number of issues such as taxation, domestic/international policy, law and order etc, my opportunity to influence is polling day and if a few more of us turned out and took an interest in the world around us then we would have the representation we deserve in my opinion. When those self appointed busybody cretins turn up at your house every few years to 'count upon your support' - make the buggers work for it - bend their slimey ears and tell them what life is like for you stuck on a two hour commute on roads barely big enough for the traffic at a cost in fuel that makes a real dent in your monthly income for a salary that barely covers your outgoings.

Happy Christmas.

14 December 2007

What price is Biodiesel ?

http://www.green-car-guide.com/news/create-biodiesel-in-back-garden.htm says as low as 9 p / Litre [if you make it yourself]

at least there is one place in Wales where you can buy this stuff: http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk/news/wales-news/2007/12/06/wales-gets-its-first-garage-style-biodiesel-pump-91466-20209603/

On a commercial scale it appears to cost about 30 pence per litre to make, Fuel retailers are reluctant to take the pumps, and where it is sold , the cost to the consumer is only a few pence less than Diesel. So if you make it at home you can have 2500 litres duty free, but if you go to a pump you don't get any tax break. Bring back RATION BOOKS so we can all get our 2500 litre duty free tax break.

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