Sanyo developed car travels 624 miles on a single charge
27 May 2010

An electric car fitted with a special lithium ion battery created by Japanese company Sanyo has travelled 624 miles on a single charge.

The record, which was set at the Japanese race circuit of Shimotsuma, took 27 hours to complete, with 17 different drivers taking the wheel.

However, the car travelled at just 25mph throughout the test.

The test run was organised by the Japan Electric Vehicle Club, which plans to approach the Guinness Book of World Records to officially recognise it as the world's longest electric car journey.

The previous world record for distance travelled on a single charge was 345 miles, which was set last November by the same team.

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14

27 May 2010

I'm sorry but I just don't see what the fuss is with EVs?

I'm all for non-polluting vehicles but these EVs cost a lot more than their IC counterparts. Not to mention the Billions invested by the government installing charging outlets throughout the land.

27 May 2010

Not impressed!

this car did 12,500 miles with no battery or fuel!

http://www.gizmag.com/solar-car-world-distance-record/11332/picture/73432/

electric cars won't ever take off unless they figure out a way to charge it instantaneously, maybe have a standard battery that you pull into a service station and they swap it in under a minute with a charged one.

Hydrogen is the way forward, easy to make (pass electricity through water) the by product of making it is oxygen (that never goes amiss!) and can be fueled like petrol and give petrol like performance.

Seems the ideal solution as it could be piped straight to garages too taking tanker lorries off the road.

If an off shore wind farm combined with a hydro wave powered generator were used to make electricity to convert water to hydrogen it could be a clean process.

Anyone out there know what HP/torque you could get out of a hydrogen engine?

Here's to the crazy ones......

27 May 2010

[quote iamthestig]

 Not impressed!

 

this car did 12,500 miles with no battery or fuel!

 

http://www.gizmag.com/solar-car-world-distance-record/11332/picture/73432/

 

electric cars won't ever take off unless they figure out a way to charge it instantaneously, maybe have a standard battery that you pull into a service station and they swap it in under a minute with a charged one.

 

Hydrogen is the way forward, easy to make (pass electricity through water) the by product of making it is oxygen (that never goes amiss!) and can be fueled like petrol and give petrol like performance.

 Seems the ideal solution as it could be piped straight to garages too taking tanker lorries off the road.

 

If an off shore wind farm combined with a hydro wave powered generator were used to make electricity to convert water to hydrogen it could be a clean process.

 

Anyone out there know what HP/torque you could get out of a hydrogen engine?

[/quote] You do realise that even Hydrogen cars esentially be EV's with their batteries replaced with an onboard Hydrogen tank which then generates electricity through electolysis The future is electric vehicles, if not battery EV's then Hydrogen EV's

27 May 2010

[quote iamthestig]Hydrogen is the way forward, easy to make[/quote] Easy is most definitely not the same as cheap or safe.

[quote iamthestig] Seems the ideal solution as it could be piped straight to garages[/quote] Do you know how explosive hydrogen is?

[quote iamthestig]Anyone out there know what HP/torque you could get out of a hydrogen engine?[/quote] BMW built a 7 Series with an engine that could burn either petrol or hydrogen. When running on hydrogen, it's 6 litre V12 engine could manage a 0-60 of 9.5 seconds, with an economy of 5.6 MPG. Park it up with a full tank of hydrogen and 17 days later it'll be empty, even if you don't drive it. Battery EV sounds more practical than burning hydrogen in an IC engine.

27 May 2010

The future of motoing is thrilling. Pass the pipe and slippers!

27 May 2010

[quote autocrazy]You do realise that even Hydrogen cars esentially be EV's with their batteries replaced with an onboard Hydrogen tank which then generates electricity through electolysis The future is electric vehicles, if not battery EV's then Hydrogen EV's[/quote]

If fuel cells then yes. But you can power a good old-fashioned reciprocating piston internal combustion engine on hydrogen too, fairly easily.

27 May 2010

[quote MrTrilby]Easy is most definitely not the same as cheap or safe.[/quote] Because petrol is so cheap and safe - it's one of those fuels where you can't light it with a naked flame.... oh, wait... A lot of the problems stated with hydrogen you have with petrol products as well I'm afraid. Hydrogen could fit easily in to our existing infrastructure, could fuel IC engines (though not as well as we'd like), but as mentioned through it through a fuel cell and you get electricity. Honda FCX for example. Problem is those fuel cells currently aren't cheap and use expensive metals, like batteries do, or catalytic converters... We're not there yet, but EV (be it battery or hydrogen) will make it's way in and in 10-20 years time we'll not even notice the change (bar electric milkfloat sounds and certain posters on here still foaming at the mouth about it being a con, the UK being broker than a kiddy's toy and basing all their opinions on dodgy internet sites).

27 May 2010

[quote theonlydt]Because petrol is so cheap and safe - it's one of those fuels where you can't light it with a naked flame[/quote]

Exactly, relatively to hydrogen, petrol is both cheap and safe. Petrol is liquid at room temperature that you can easily stored and transported in nothing more fancy than a can. If you spill it, the spill is visible. Hydrogen on the other hand has to be stored at high pressure/low temperature. When hydrogen leaks, it's a colourless odourless gas that is difficult to detect. It only needs 1/10th the energy of petrol to ignite it, and when you do ignite it, it burns with an invisible flame.

There's a reason that BMW's Hydrogen 7 car isn't allowed to be parked in underground car parks. The hydrogen does leak from its tank no matter what, and when it does, you can forget needing a naked flame to light it: it only takes the static discharge from touching your car on a dry day. You can't see the flame to know it's on fire - first indication you get is the fuel tank explodes.

I don't know about you, but to me, that sounds a different ball game to petrol.

27 May 2010

Sod it let's go all out and make Nuclear powered cars. You have a little Uranium capsule installed by your dealer and you run on it for a year or 30,000km/18,500mls. At time of inspection the capsule is replaced for a new one.

Nuclear Power is pretty safe 99.99999999999999999999999999% of the time it's that 0.000000000000000000000000000001% error that makes your day a bit of a Sh!tter and in the case of a little Uranium capsule probably anyone within 100m radius.

However that would be the fallout range, unlike when a Powerstation goes into meltdown and those effects usually spread over a 1,000 Miles. So my case for Nuclear power vehicles is; it's better to have tiny local radiation-exposure than having a mammoth reactor go nuclear.

So there you go guys discuss that idiotic suggestion. : D

27 May 2010

Very impressive. 25 mph is just about what city driving allows these days. While auto technicians and engineers get on with developing the breed naysayers and Luddites can get on with outdoing each other in terminal negativity. "EVs dayin' oer 500 miles oan a single charge? Wurr awe doooomed!"

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