New agreement will make it easier for manufacturers to meet legislation
2 December 2008

Car makers and EU politicians have reached a new deal on regulating car CO2 emissions that will make it easier for Europe’s car makers to meet legislation.

The agreement will require manufacturers to cut average CO2 emissions by 18 per cent over the next six years. That’s a step back from the potentially crippling CO2 targets that were previously discussed.

CO2 emissions will now be reduced to an average of 130g/km between 2012 and 2015, rather than by 2012 as was originally proposed. A new long-term goal of 95g/km CO2 by 2020 will also be introduced.

“We have shown that we can encourage car manufacturers to go green by including incentives for investment in clean technology, but without driving them out of business,” said Martin Callanan MEP.

Conservative MEPs also defended a special exception to the targets for manufacturers like Jaguar-Land Rover, who don’t build small cars.

The two British companies will still have to drastically reduce the CO2 output of their cars, but not by the levels that had been foreseen. A special exemption was also secured for LTI, which builds black cabs.

“It was particularly important that we put in place special conditions for Jaguar- Land Rover and black cabs,” said Callanan. “These companies will still have to do more than most, but because of their niche model ranges, this law would have caused them severe problems.”

“We will now ask all sides to agree to this deal.”

Will Powell

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Comments
7

2 December 2008

I can understand JLR given a level of exemption, but not LTI. Black cabs are everywhere in large cities, they need to get drastically more efficient/environmentally friendly, and this won't help. Their ancient engines and 3 speed gearboxes need to go. I loathe it when I have to walk past taxi ranks and inhale the could of fumes that follow them about...

2 December 2008

That's MUCH better. Under the previous rules, which had a hard target average co2 target, companies like Fiat got a free pass (when the vast majority of the world's car emissions come from such marques), and the luxury brands -which have made the most progress improving their acts- were given an impossible mission. A percentage reduction makes EVERYONE step up, and specifically punishes no-one. Lamborghini already reduced their emissions by 18% with the new Gallardo.

They still need to rethink that hard target for 2020 though. Percentage reductions are the way to go.

2 December 2008

Finally some common sense!

I have to agree with nbranford though on the whole black cab thing. Why can't they re-source their engines and fall in line with the rest of the automotive industry. It's not as if there is a technical reason why they can't.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

2 December 2008

Have they actually signed up for this yet?


Bring back steel wheels.

2 December 2008

Totally agree with the black cab stuff. LTi should be looking at ways to improve their vehicles. Stop start would help no end! Im all for the company surviving and making money on selling taxis, but I don't think they should just sit there and not do anything about it

2 December 2008

regarding black cabs, I think the article implies they will still have to reduce their emissions, just not down to 130g/km, which would be near impossible for a car designed to carry 6 people (driver included) & luggage.

That said another article online says LTI is "exempt" from the rules.

Anyone know which it is?

2 December 2008

[quote phenergn]

That said another article online says LTI is "exempt" from the rules.

Anyone know which it is?

[/quote]

Bear in mind none of ths is ratified yet, first of all.

The outline deal gives niche manufacturers derogation from the main rules for the mass producers. JLR is one of these "niche" maufacturers. LTI obviously too. They, 'the nichers', will not be bound by the 120g by 2012 for 65% of output moving to 100% by 2015, but rather a compulsion to reduce their fleet average CO2 emission figure by 25%* by 2012/2015(?) from their 2007 level. Should be a cinch for the LR behemoths. And since when did a 250,000 units a year producer become niche? Okay they, JLR, are headed for sub 100K/year output but they still currently claim to be Britain's biggest auto maker.

* the 25% figure for the niche manufacturers is not wholly arbitrary but would seem to reflect the approximate general reduction called for by this deal from the current European fleet average of around 160g down to 120g by 2012.

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