Bold concept, set to go on sale in 2020, previews imminent second-generation hydrogen-powered vehicle
James Attwood, digital editor
22 October 2019

Toyota's dramatic new Mirai Concept, which previews the second-generation version of its hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, has been shown in public for the first time at the Tokyo motor show. A production version of the car will go on sale in late 2020.

The new hydrogen-powered concept is described as “a final-stage development model of the second-generation Mirai” and Toyota promises a major step forward in fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) technology. It claims the new model offers a 30% increase in driving range over the current model, which has a range of just over 300 miles, along with improved driving performance.

All the news from the 2019 Tokyo motor show

The new Mirai Concept is built on Toyota’s latest TNGA platform and features dramatic new styling, including a revamped front with a bold grille and a sweeping, coupé-esque rear. Toyota claims increased body rigidity and a lower centre of gravity than the original Mirai.

Our Verdict

Toyota Mirai

Toyota claims another first: Europe’s first ‘ownable’ hydrogen car, whether the infrastructure to properly support it is ready for it or not

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The concept measures 4935mm long and 1885mm wide, with a wheelbase of 2920mm. It sits on 20in wheels and retains the four-door saloon layout of the original Mirai, which was launched in 2014.

The interior has also been reworked. It features a 12.3in central touchscreen and a digital instrument display, with many of the controls moved to the centre of the dashboard. Notably, the Mirai now has five seats instead of the original’s four, which, Toyota says, has been enabled by a reworking of the hydrogen fuel cell configuration.

Aside from the claimed increase in range, Toyota has not given specific details of development work done on the fuel cell powertrain. But it says the system, including the fuel cell stack, has been entirely redesigned and offers increased hydrogen storage. It also claims the work on the system ensures a smoother, linear response, along with improved handling.

Read more

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Comments
18

10 October 2019

and the back is quite Audi A7-ish... no? 

The technology is super interesting but the infrastructure is still the key. 

11 October 2019

Cue the uninformed, undeducated, comments about hydrogen being 4,000% less efficient than batteries because I read it on the interwebs!

:-p

11 October 2019
jason_recliner wrote:

Cue the uninformed, undeducated, comments about hydrogen being 4,000% less efficient than batteries because I read it on the interwebs!

:-p

Well, any proof why Hydrogen is far more efficient for road cars over BEV?
I always favour the best technology - But still haven't found a good enough reason for fuel cells to be used.(apart from shipping and aeroplanes)

10 October 2019

I think its a really good looking car, and i still find the idea of filling up with hydogen, just as i do with petrol now, far more appealing than plugging in for ages. However, it is all down to the filling stations. If Toyota want it to be a success they need to do what Tesla did, and build their own filling stations.  

11 October 2019

The Mirrai and Clarity are currently bombing in the US and Europe despite huge give aways and lease only deals. And that's ignoring the facts that using Hydrogen as a fuel is incredibily inefficient compared to Electricity only.

Can go further? This 5 seater is nearly 5 metres long there should be enough room for fuel storage to go to the moon let alone 300 miles (250 in real world maybe) before range anxiety kicks in.

Nope, Toyota should have a proper BEV out now especially with all the knowledge gained from the Prius. Fall behind at your peril Mr Toyota!  

11 October 2019
xxxx wrote:

The Mirrai and Clarity are currently bombing in the US and Europe despite huge give aways and lease only deals. And that's ignoring the facts that using Hydrogen as a fuel is incredibily inefficient compared to Electricity only.

Can go further? This 5 seater is nearly 5 metres long there should be enough room for fuel storage to go to the moon let alone 300 miles (250 in real world maybe) before range anxiety kicks in.

Nope, Toyota should have a proper BEV out now especially with all the knowledge gained from the Prius. Fall behind at your peril Mr Toyota!  

 

You post the question "Why"?...we ask why you post.

12 October 2019

If you have something to say, say it instead of picking on other posters.

By trying to belittle others you reveal your nastiness without contributing anything to the discussion. 

22 October 2019
abkq wrote:

If you have something to say, say it instead of picking on other posters.

By trying to belittle others you reveal your nastiness without contributing anything to the discussion. 

 

Haha, wind your scrawny neck in, moron.

12 October 2019

Toyota are far ahead of the pack in their product strategy, what reason would there be for them to introduce an BEV? None whatsoever.

Look at the CO2 output of their hybrid powertrains and how many of them they sell in Europe. Compare that to the CAFE targets for CO2 which come into force next year. Achieving those targets in a profitable way is the key task for any manufacturer in the European market right now, and Toyota will breeze through it.

The Mirai is more to do with PR in addition to being prepared for a fuel which has the potential to become important in their home market, rather than any intention to sell it in volume in Europe or the US.

xxxx wrote:

The Mirrai and Clarity are currently bombing in the US and Europe despite huge give aways and lease only deals. And that's ignoring the facts that using Hydrogen as a fuel is incredibily inefficient compared to Electricity only.

Can go further? This 5 seater is nearly 5 metres long there should be enough room for fuel storage to go to the moon let alone 300 miles (250 in real world maybe) before range anxiety kicks in.

Nope, Toyota should have a proper BEV out now especially with all the knowledge gained from the Prius. Fall behind at your peril Mr Toyota!  

14 October 2019
Pietka Chavellini wrote:

Toyota are far ahead of the pack in their product strategy, what reason would there be for them to introduce an BEV? None whatsoever.

Look at the CO2 output of their hybrid powertrains and how many of them they sell in Europe. Compare that to the CAFE targets for CO2 which come into force next year. Achieving those targets in a profitable way is the key task for any manufacturer in the European market right now, and Toyota will breeze through it.

The Mirai is more to do with PR in addition to being prepared for a fuel which has the potential to become important in their home market, rather than any intention to sell it in volume in Europe or the US.

xxxx wrote:

The Mirrai and Clarity are currently bombing in the US and Europe despite huge give aways and lease only deals. And that's ignoring the facts that using Hydrogen as a fuel is incredibily inefficient compared to Electricity only.

Can go further? This 5 seater is nearly 5 metres long there should be enough room for fuel storage to go to the moon let alone 300 miles (250 in real world maybe) before range anxiety kicks in.

Nope, Toyota should have a proper BEV out now especially with all the knowledge gained from the Prius. Fall behind at your peril Mr Toyota!  

'Why would they make a bev' because without one they may not survive, they certainly won't survive if they think the future is Hydrogen and ICE

"The Mirai is more to do with PR in addition to being prepared for a fuel which has the potential to become important in their home market, rather than any intention to sell it in volume in Europe or the US."  :- No one brings out a cars that lose thousands of dollars per unit just for PR, they can't even sell them as they're all leased so if anythig it's bad PR.

Hydrogen as a fuel will always be less efficient as a fuel than electricity, it's impossible for it not to be! And if the laws of physics change then, just as EV production as shown, the big boys will quickly get in the act!

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