Porsche has shifted the 4.0-litre flat six of the new 911 RSR ahead of its rear axle
Sam Sheehan
16 November 2016

New Porsche 911 RSR specifications have been released, confirming that the 2017 Le Mans and World Endurance Championship (WEC) racer will use a mid-engined layout.

Unlike the rear-engined road 911, the RSR’s 503bhp 4.0-litre six-cylinder engine is located in front of its back axle to enable the fitment of a large rear diffuser. The use of this new part should help the car to produce significantly more downforce than the current one, which uses a much smaller item.

The midship location of the powertrain is also likely to improve the RSR's overall weight balance, and it comes as part of a complete overhaul for the racer that includes an all-new structure, suspension and aerodynamic concept compared with the current RSR.

The head of Porsche Motorsport, Frank-Steffen Walliser, said the new car’s engineering changes represent “the biggest evolution in the history of [Porsche’s] top GT model”.

The car uses a six-speed sequential gearbox with steering wheel shift paddles, a multi-disc self-locking differential and a three-disc carbon race clutch.

The car’s base weight – as per regulations – is 1243kg, and it conforms to LM-GTE class rules that are use at Le Mans and in the WEC.

New for the 2017 racer is an automatic emergency braking system that uses radar control like road cars to help avoid major impacts during a race. There’s also a new multi-function steering wheel, LED headlights and tail-lights and an air conditioning system – as per GT racing regulations.

The new RSR's first race will be in the US at the International Motor Sports Association championship season opener at Daytona on 28-29 January. It'll then be used by the factory Porsche team for the WEC and Le Mans.

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Comments
8

16 November 2016
Less and less beautiful...

Mid engined... Not a 911 ! Not strong rules... Not so good...

More downforce, etc.

I think it's not a good trend for GTE.

"New for the 2017 racer is an automatic emergency braking system, that uses radar control like road cars to help avoid major impacts during a race." Is it a joke? Even they have traction control, etc...

The bigger is the technological evolution, the less spectacular are the cars on track. They should know that...

16 November 2016
If Porsche was going midengined then the new LM-GTE class car should have been built around the Cayman, it just proves the 911 concept has reached the end of the road if they can't build a top notch racing car out of it.

17 November 2016
KiwiRob wrote:

If Porsche was going midengined then the new LM-GTE class car should have been built around the Cayman, it just proves the 911 concept has reached the end of the road if they can't build a top notch racing car out of it.

Sounds almost similar to BPR GT 1996. When the 911 GT2 Evo could'nt keep up with the Mclarens, Porsche came out with a certain mid-engined car..
But of course, ideally the future Porsche 911 racecars should continue racing in rear-engined guise based on the roadcar configuration, although I was hoping for the return of turbo-engined 911 back in the competition arena after years of normally aspirated 911 GT3s..

17 November 2016
I'm assuming that to meet the GTE class requirements of the WEC, there'll have to be road-going versions of this new mid-engine 911? Otherwise there'd be nothing stopping other manufactures in the class coming up with what would effectively be one-off, purpose built racing cars with no-going versions. Just like the P1 and P2 cars.

17 November 2016
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17 November 2016
If they are going to race it at Daytona, why not name it with some name from that part of the world...say....Cayman.

Seriously I thought racing GTs have to have the engine in the position of the production car. Otherwise anyone can just do a mid engine car. A mid engine GTR would set the pulse racing or an F type. A few years ago BMW were banned from racing the M3V8 as the production car had a different engine. Hard to see how Porsche can do this unless they call it...

ScottishRichard

17 November 2016
Looks like it'd be a bundle of fun on the next Gran Turismo or Forza Motorsport. A 911 with a shitload of downforce - brilliant.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

18 November 2016
Sorry.

Great Metro. Can we have the Renault Clio with the big V6 on the back seat? That engine was about the same size as the Nissan Z/GTR engine so they could put it on the back seat of a Micra...The Micra GT4.

ScottishRichard

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