New Audi Q5 rival will make its debut at the Geneva motor show with three new driver assist programmes
Sam Sheehan
28 February 2017

The Volvo XC60 will be revealed at the Geneva motor show with a new automatic steering assistance system that is claimed to significantly reduce the chances of an accident.

2017 Volvo XC60 review

The technology works with the car’s city safety automatic braking technology at speeds of 31-62mph, turning the wheels away from an impact when braking alone won’t prevent it.

In the case of a potential impact with an oncoming vehicle, the system can also steer the car back onto the correct side of the road. This part of the system works at speeds of 37-87mph.

Cars specced with an optional blind spot information system can use the technology to prevent potential impacts with cars that are unsighted by drivers. The active steering system can take control of the wheel to direct the car away from a vehicle before contact is made.

“In Sweden alone we have seen a decline of around 45% in rear-end frontal crashes thanks to our collision warning with auto brake system,” said Malin Ekholm, Volvo’s senior director at it safety centre. “With the XC60 we are determined to take the next step in reducing avoidable collisions with the addition of steering support and assistance systems.”

The new technology represents a step towards Volvo’s target for nobody to die in its new models from the year 2020.

Our Verdict

Volvo XC60

Volvo is justifiably proud of its different approach, and the usable, attractive XC60 is good enough to stand out in a very able compact SUV crowd

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Comments
12

28 February 2017
Am I the only one to think that all these automated 'driver assistance' systems are just dumbing down driving - catering to those who are incapable of controlling their own vehicle? To date I've driven around two million miles and had one minor accident, during the other 1,999,000 miles I stayed safe by paying attention, reading the road and knowing the limits of the vehicle and conditions - all without the benefit of any driver assistance. Obviously all these technological developments are heading us towards one goal and in the meantime we're being steered (pun intended) further and further down the road of autonomous transport.

jer

28 February 2017
I expect it will look great have an nice interior. But I suspect the reasons there are so many on driveways is you could get a grade deal on the old one for a premium feeling looking product.

28 February 2017
So your in busy traffic, in the outside lane, a few cars ahead someone suddenly crashes/breaks down and stops. The cars in line all start emergency slowing. Your Volvo decides you may not quite make it and still have a (fairly low speed bump) so it swerves you out into the middle lane where you get broadsided by an X5 still doing 80. No thanks as above.

28 February 2017
[quote=The Apprentice]So your in busy traffic, in the outside lane, a few cars ahead someone suddenly crashes/breaks down and stops. The cars in line all start emergency slowing. Your Volvo decides you may not quite make it and still have a (fairly low speed bump) so it swerves you out into the middle lane where you get broadsided by an X5 still doing 80. No thanks as above.[/quote] Yeah, of course... that's exactly how Volvo designed it. Don't be ridiculous.

28 February 2017
[quote=m_bowl][quote=The Apprentice]So your in busy traffic, in the outside lane, a few cars ahead someone suddenly crashes/breaks down and stops. The cars in line all start emergency slowing. Your Volvo decides you may not quite make it and still have a (fairly low speed bump) so it swerves you out into the middle lane where you get broadsided by an X5 still doing 80. No thanks as above.[/quote] Yeah, of course... that's exactly how Volvo designed it. Don't be ridiculous.[/quote] OK Einstein, why would it not? if the radar sees your going to hit and the camera sees a space to the left.. it doesn't have battleship radar that can see all around! I have been in this exact situation and saw in my passenger door mirror taking the left was a bad call and managed to avoid a collision by taking some upcoming space near the centre barrier. No way on earth the car could have made that call, it would have taken the clear space left into the middle lane and the tanking X5 with the dozy driver 100m back closing fast would have broadsided and probably have rolled me.

28 February 2017
[quote=The Apprentice][quote=m_bowl][quote=The Apprentice]So your in busy traffic, in the outside lane, a few cars ahead someone suddenly crashes/breaks down and stops. The cars in line all start emergency slowing. Your Volvo decides you may not quite make it and still have a (fairly low speed bump) so it swerves you out into the middle lane where you get broadsided by an X5 still doing 80. No thanks as above.[/quote] Yeah, of course... that's exactly how Volvo designed it. Don't be ridiculous.[/quote] OK Einstein, why would it not? if the radar sees your going to hit and the camera sees a space to the left.. it doesn't have battleship radar that can see all around! I have been in this exact situation and saw in my passenger door mirror taking the left was a bad call and managed to avoid a collision by taking some upcoming space near the centre barrier. No way on earth the car could have made that call, it would have taken the clear space left into the middle lane and the tanking X5 with the dozy driver 100m back closing fast would have broadsided and probably have rolled me.[/quote] Well, you thought of this problem in less than 2 mins, so I suspect Volvo may have considered it too. They have many people, much experience and have no doubt put a tonne of money into this. Admittedly it's stted as optional, but the blind spot monitoring system could be one way of doing this. No doubt there's many other sensors spread around the vehicle.

28 February 2017
I'd be so nervous that a car can take over at any time, computers go wrong you know, and steer onto the pavement or oncoming traffic. I'd rather have a petrol 2.0 litre manual AWD or Sat Nav at a sensible level. Thank You

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

28 February 2017
In the perfect world we'd all be 100% attentive and great drivers (like you and me and people who read this site!). Sadly people who care about driving are in a tiny minority. These systems are far more reliable than 99% of drivers who think cars are just a place to chat, do work, eat, selfies etc. I'd rather have a safety equipped Volvo driving behind me than a school run mum looking for somewhere to park as close as possible to school and not watching the road in front.....

 

 

 

28 February 2017
I consider myself to be a good driver but the standard of driving generally in this Country is appalling. I took my rally car on a trailer and three times had idiots overtake on the inside, twice they were in my blind spot and one of the times I very nearly clipped someone doing it. I was rewarded with a blaring horn and gesticulation. What sort of cretin overtakes a van and trailer on the inside? Another one shot past me on a roundabout on my left side. My father always said that one of the reasons for crashes on ice and snow was that people were cocooned in the warmth of a modern car and were oblivious to the freezing temperatures outside the car; I can understand that. Getting rear ended by some tw*t sending a text is now a constant issue. Anything that stops people that refuse to concentrate on what they're doing or driving too fast because they are perpetually late is a good thing in my book, I'm afraid.

28 February 2017
As others have said, driving standards have fallen in the UK and there are also far too many imbeciles texting, applying make-up and generally not paying attention but the responsibility for safety start with the driver. You don't hear of airline pilots saying "oops I was distratced txting my girlfriend and accidentally clipped another 747"!! The more we encourage safety systems that effectively remove responsibility from the driver the less attention the driver will feel they need to pay - why bother, the car will sort it all out.. No, the best way to improve road safety would be more responsibility & accountability: mandatory training & retesting of drivers and a judicial system that had the b***s to hand down meaningful sentences to those who can't be bothered to drive with due care and attention.

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