Toyota's newly formed Research Institute will work on the next generation of technology, including autonomous vehicles and safety technology
Darren Moss
5 January 2016

The new Toyota new Research Institute (TRI) will develop the next generation of automotive technology as part of a $1 billion research effort.

The TRI comprises teams working at both the Stanford University in California and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr Gill Pratt, head of the TRI, told journalists at the Consumer Electronics Show that “we can’t just look to solve driving when it’s easy, we need to solve driving when it’s hard.”

Four mandates will guide the TRI’s research efforts. The first is to enhance the safety of cars, resulting in a car that is "incapable" of causing an accident.

The second mandate calls for the TRI to “increase access to cars to those who cannot otherwise drive", and is aimed specifically at older people. The third mandate calls for the sharing of expertise, with the objective of creating products for indoor and outdoor mobility.

Finally, the last mandate states that the TRI will use learning from artificial technology studies to support future robotics.

Around 30 research projects have already been approved, and two were highlighted at CES. The first, led by the Stanford team, has been dubbed Uncertainty on Uncertainty, and is designed to teach autonomous cars to safely respond to unanticipated events.

The second research project, which will be undertaken at MIT, is called The Car Can Explain. It will provide connected and autonomous cars with the ability to explain their actions. If an autonomous car is deemed to be responsible for an accident, for example, the car will be able to clearly explain its thought processes.

As well as its own research projects, Pratt confirmed that TRI would “enthusiastically pursue” collaborations with other companies, including other vehicle manufacturers, with the goal of jointly developing autonomous vehicle technology.

The formation of the TRI was announced in November of last year, with the aim of “bridging the gap between fundamental research and product development.”

“While the most important technology for enhancing human mobility has traditionally been hardware, today software and data are increasingly essential,” said Pratt.

“The scale of Toyota’s commitment reflects our belief in the importance of developing safe and reliable automated mobility systems. Simply put, we believe we can significantly improve the quality of life for all people, regardless of age, with mobility products in all aspects of life.”

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Comments
1

6 January 2016
“increase access to cars to those who cannot otherwise drive,” otherwise called a taxi or bus. And how many people who can't drive can afford the £80,000 (at a guess) or so it would cost for a truly autonomous car, remember if they can't drive it will have to do everything.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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