Currently reading: Volkswagen reveals new 268bhp diesel engine
Electric turbocharging and high pressure common rail injection boost power and efficiency of Wolfsburg’s four-pot oilburner
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2 mins read
10 November 2014

Volkswagen has showcased an advanced 268bhp version of its turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder diesel engine in a technical presentation at its Wolfsburg headquarters in Germany.

The power plant is expected to play an integral role in Volkswagen's efforts to meet tough CO2 emission targets that form part of new EU regulations set to come into force in 2020.

The new engine, described as a development of the existing EA288 unit used across the Volkswagen line-up, is claimed to deliver a 14 per cent improvement in power and economy over the most powerful variant of the Volkswagen diesel currently in production, the 237bhp engine recently unveiled in the Volkswagen Passat.

Among the developments brought to the new diesel is a two-stage electrically operated turbocharger, a piezo valve common rail injection system that operates at pressures of up to 2500bar and a newly engineered variable valve timing system.

With 268bhp, Volkswagen’s new 2.0-litre four-cylinder diesel engine kicks out 10bhp more than its recently updated 3.0 V6 diesel, as found in the facelifted VW Touareg.

Volkswagen is yet to reveal a definitive torque figure for the new diesel, which is earmarked to power upper range models, including an upcoming production version of the Cross Blue SUV concept in a transverse mounting. However, Wolfsburg officials suggest it is on a level comparable to the 237bhp variant, which boasts 369lb ft.

In addition to the new diesel, Volkswagen has also provided limited details to its new 10-speed dual shift gearbox (DSG), as revealed at the Vienna motor symposium earlier this year and planned to go into production in 2016.

A development of the existing six-speed wet clutch unit, the new 10-speed twin clutch gearbox is also being looked upon to contribute to a further improvement in fuel economy and reduction in emissions throughout the Volkswagen line-up.

Codenamed DQ511, the new gearbox has been engineered to handle torque loadings of up to 405lb ft, suggesting it could be coupled with a wide range of Volkswagen engines, including the latest variant of its four-cylinder diesel.

Among the features offered by the 10-speed DSG is a coasting function that switches off the engine during periods of trailing throttle and then starts it automatically for added fuel savings, as well as a newly engineered brake energy recuperation system described as being more efficient that the system presently in use at Volkswagen.

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Volkswagen Passat 2011-2014

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Add a comment…
lajwii112 13 November 2014

Reliability

Is going to be a major concern if this ever gets into production, just as Will86 said, i dont want to not give credit where its due as it is quite an achievement compared to whats currently around. But lets face it, im sure manufacturers could get 300+ BHP from a 2.0TDI and anyone whos owned an Evo knows what they can do with 2.0T petrols also. But lets face it coaxing such power from small capacity engines is never really practical because they need to be serviced alot more and regardless of what frauduent figures the manufacturers class as official, they get shocking mpg compared to their equivalents with slightly less power
bowsersheepdog 13 November 2014

Flow-No

Not specifically related to this article but if anyone can offer information I'd be appreciative. The only diesel car I've owned was a 1997 Rover 620 turbodiesel, which I bought at about ten years old and ran as a second car for a couple of years. It was very comfy and had a reasonable turn of pace for a family saloon but each winter there would be at least a couple of occasions when I'd go out in the morning and find the diesel had frozen. Or waxed as I was informed is more correct. So long as I didn't drain the battery trying to fire it up then with the aid of a kettle I would eventually get away, and once running it was okay, but I have wondered whether this is something that is maybe only really a problem up here in the highlands, and whether more modern diesels have solved the problem. As it stands I'd be quite wary of having to rely on a diesel as my only transport in a harsh winter.
Will86 11 November 2014

Meh

It's just a 2.0 TDI with the wick turned up. To be honest I'm not that impressed. That's not to say that the VAG engineers have been lazy - I'm sure a lot of effort went in - but some form of plug in hybrid drivetrain would be more interesting and perhaps more suited to the high end cars this engine will go in.
typos1 12 November 2014

Will86 wrote:It's just a 2.0

Will86 wrote:

It's just a 2.0 TDI with the wick turned up. To be honest I'm not that impressed. That's not to say that the VAG engineers have been lazy - I'm sure a lot of effort went in - but some form of plug in hybrid drivetrain would be more interesting and perhaps more suited to the high end cars this engine will go in.

No it isnt, its got new injectros, new injection pump (500bar more powerful) and electric turbos (no lag), did you actually READ the article !!??

Will86 12 November 2014

typos1 wrote:Will86

typos1 wrote:
Will86 wrote:

It's just a 2.0 TDI with the wick turned up. To be honest I'm not that impressed. That's not to say that the VAG engineers have been lazy - I'm sure a lot of effort went in - but some form of plug in hybrid drivetrain would be more interesting and perhaps more suited to the high end cars this engine will go in.

No it isnt, its got new injectros, new injection pump (500bar more powerful) and electric turbos (no lag), did you actually READ the article !!??

READ it? No, but I did read it. It's quite normal for manufacturers to alter parts between low and high output engines - the BMW 2.0 diesel is a prime example - but fundamentally it's still the same engine. This engine is, as the article says, a development of the existing 2.0 TDI unit with some new parts. I'll grant you the electric turbo is vaguely interesting but I stand by my comments, it still remains a 4 cylinder diesel and I don't think it is aspirational enough for the high end vehicles it'll end up in.

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