Currently reading: UK electric motor firm Equipmake ready to become world's top supplier
Norfolk-based electronics R&D company is about to begin an expansion phase that will convert it to a tier one manufacturer of electric motors
Steve Cropley Autocar
News
2 mins read
30 May 2018

Equipmake, the Norfolk-based electronics R&D company, is about to begin an unprecedented expansion phase that, within five years, will convert it to a tier one manufacturer of electric motors for cars, making “hundreds of thousands a year”.

The firm, which over the past decade has used a highly successful phase designing KERS systems for Formula 1 and World Endurance Championship cars to acquire cutting-edge knowledge of automotive motors, has designed and built a range of so-called spoke machines — compact permanent magnet motors with the magnets arranged as spokes in a wheel for efficient torque generation.

New ultra-capacitor tech could drastically boost battery EV range

Equipmake’s founder and managing director, Ian Foley, says spoke motors aren’t new; his company’s achievement is to have discovered — and patented — a new way to cool the magnets that allows them to deliver higher continuous power than others. In most applications, Equipmake motors will thus be smaller, higher-revving and use less materials.

Foley estimates that Equipmake has a lead of around two years over rivals.

The demand for electric motors from big car companies has “changed completely” over the past year or so, Foley says, as they rush to compete with eye-catching models such as the Tesla Model 3 and Jaguar I-Pace.

Equipmake’s opportunity now is to become a major supplier, Foley explains, by “employing hundreds of people and manufacturing hundreds of thousands of motors”. The company will need to build in steps, he says, taking in outside investors and carefully controlling quality as it goes, before concluding: “But there’s absolutely no doubt the opportunity’s there.”

Read more

Rimac's second electric hypercar: 120kWh battery and 'full autonomy'

Confusion hinders hybrid and EV sales

New ultra-capacitor tech could drastically boost battery EV range

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find an Autocar review

Read our review

Car review
Seat Arona

Seat is on a roll but can the Arona, its new junior SUV, cut it in such an ultra-competitive class?

Join the debate

Comments
12
Add a comment…
bol 30 May 2018

Let’s hope they build the factory near Norwich

It would be great to have a bit of industry back 

1stdarkhorse 30 May 2018

EV Motors

Efficiency, weight, size, reliability and torque will all play a part.

Interestingly, the motor is probably Mr Dyson's greatest USP. Haven't heard about his EV project for a while?

xxxx 30 May 2018

Good point about Dyson

They're employing over 400 engineers on the BEV so it's not something that can be quietly dropped

Bazzer 30 May 2018

Excellent news, to see a

Excellent news, to see a British company going to the fore.  I hope the government are helping as much as the EU allows them to.  I run a small engineering business and we are aware of the negativity that exists in this country, and a willingness to either buy Chinese (because it's cheap crap) or buy German (because they think that's a badge of distinction (it isn't).  I wish them every success.

GODFATHER 30 May 2018

Bazzer wrote:

Bazzer wrote:

Excellent news, to see a British company going to the fore.  I hope the government are helping as much as the EU allows them to.  I run a small engineering business and we are aware of the negativity that exists in this country, and a willingness to either buy Chinese (because it's cheap crap) or buy German (because they think that's a badge of distinction (it isn't).  I wish them every success.

Distinction? more like the badge of the idiot. 

Find an Autocar car review