750 out of 3800 staff will lose their jobs by the end of August
28 January 2010

Toyota will cut 750 UK jobs at its Burnaston, Derbyshire plant by the end of August.

The Japanese firm employs around 3800 people at the plant and the staff have been informed of Toyota’s intentions. No decision has been yet as to whether the job cuts will be compulsory.

Toyota said in a statement that the cuts were related to production capacity and efficiency and were necessary at this stage if the plant is to become sustainable in the long-term.

Models built at Burnaston include the Avensis and Auris. Production of the Auris hybrid is due to begin shortly.

Last year, Toyota revealed new working conditions at the plant which saw staff paid 10 per cent less for working less hours. But the government-backed scrappage incentive scheme ensured the plant returned to a five-day working week in August.

The full Toyota statement:

"2009 has been a tough year for Toyota Manufacturing UK.

"We already announced to our employees in 2009 that TMUK will move to a single line operation at the Burnaston plant from August 2010. This decision is related to production capacity and efficiency not to production volumes.

"During a meeting with our employee representatives on Monday we confirmed that we will have a headcount surplus of around 750 members from August onwards.

"The key point of Monday’s discussion was how to manage this situation in order to ensure we have a sustainable business for the long term."

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Toyota Auris 2007-2012

The Toyota Auris is a spacious, but unspectacular attempt at a high quality Golf rival. Only the availability of a hybrid lifts it from obscurity

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Comments
6

28 January 2010

Ooh, should we all boycott Toyota then?

28 January 2010

point of fact: it's not just Burnaston, it's the Deeside engine plant too that's affected.

Toyota is literally on the point of falling over. Sticking accelerator pedals; ensuing billion dollar-level lawsuits; massive 'unconnected' recall on floormats and now the pedal recall in the US and Europe; an unloved product range; falling perceived/actual quality; massive knee-jerk cost-cutting actions, like Burnaston/Deeside; stock price down 5% in one day...

Sorry for the workers at Toyota UK but Toyota deserves to be the first major, real casualty - self-inflicted - of the current depression.

28 January 2010

[quote BigEd] an unloved product range[/quote] Quite. If the Auris and Avensis were competitive and had at least a modicum of character perhaps they'd be selling enough of them to keep the factory running flat out. In the NA market there has definitely been a reduction in perceived and real quality - mostly because of the the cost restraints of being in that market place (you have to use cheaper cabin materials) and because the NA workers just can't put together a car as well as the Japanese. I don't want to see Toyota go under, but I'd like to see the Yaris updated and price cut slightly, the Auris completely redone to have a bit of spark and renamed the Corolla, the Avensis to lose the bulbous front end and for Toyota to not only bring in their Toyoburu concept, but maybe even a small, fun car below that. Anyone remember the drophead MR2?

28 January 2010

The new toyota/subaru car will reward them.

28 January 2010

I bought my first Toyota in June last year (an 08 Avensis TR 1.8 petrol) and having owned and done a lot of miles in a Mondeo 2.0TDCi (130) (06) Focus 1.6 Ti-VCT (115) Zetec (07) Focus 1.6LX (V) Astra (55) and base model Ka (T) it blows them all away.

I actually find the suspension setup better than the focus zetec for putting power down exiting corners (focus would drift out, Avensis doesn't). The Mondeo was another story and it took it a while to bother turning in in the first place! I really do wonder how much of the "boring" and "not a drivers car" image is just to do with the press the car is given. Body roll is well controlled and my spine doesn't get shattered on our broken roads so it does everything you would expect (hmm maybe that is why people don't like it, it behaves how you expect i.e. its good at its job and you don't feel the speed you are going at).

I do hope this is a temporary cutback while things pick up as I seem to like my Toyota and was hoping to replace it with another in a few years.

28 January 2010

The problem is the Auris and Avensis look so so dull, why is going to want to drive one? And now they go wrong too, the Koreans do better warrantees, germans better engines and then the rest of makers have the rest covered. James.

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