Set to be introduced alongside the new generation of A-Class, new entry-level engines with follow in CLA, GLA and B-Class
23 May 2017

Mercedes-Benz is set to introduce a brand new entry-level petrol engine line-up consisting of both 1.2 and 1.4-litre direct-injection units as part of a concerted downsizing initiative aimed at providing smaller models with improved economy and reduced emissions.

The new four-cylinder engines, which go under the internal codename M282, are planned to be launched in the next generation of compact Mercedes-Benz models, starting with more affordable versions of the fourth-generation A-Class, which is planned to go on sale in the UK during the second quarter of 2018.

Following their introduction in the A-Class, the new engines will be launched in upcoming successor models to the B-ClassCLA and GLA. They will also be used in the new A-Class Saloon, which was previewed by the Concept A Saloon at the 2017 Shanghai motor show, and and a new BMW X1-rivalling SUV model, expected to be called the GLB.  

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Developed in partnership with Mercedes' parent company Daimler’s alliance partner Renault-Nissan, the new engines have been conceived specifically for transverse applications, meaning they are unlikely to be used in larger Mercedes-Benz models, even in hybrid applications.

The new 1.2 and 1.4-litre four-cylinder powerplants are planned to support a heavily updated version of the existing M274 engine that's also planned for introduction in the new A-Class. This receives a new name, M260, and is planned to be offered in both 1.6 and 2.0-litre guises, with the latter forming the basis for a 400bhp-plus successor to the AMG-developed M133 unit used by the A 45, CLA 45 and GLA 45 4Matic.

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Comments
11

23 May 2017
It would be interesting to know what aspect of the design makes an engine only suitable for use with front drive and transverse application?
Surely the braking and acceleration forces are pretty similar to lateral accelerations during cornering - or maybe there is some other consideration such as minimising the cylinder block length?

23 May 2017
LP in Brighton wrote:

It would be interesting to know what aspect of the design makes an engine only suitable for use with front drive and transverse application?
Surely the braking and acceleration forces are pretty similar to lateral accelerations during cornering - or maybe there is some other consideration such as minimising the cylinder block length?

I think it's more about where the gearbox and diff sit compared to the engine. I don't think it would be an issue to fit these engines longitudinally in rwd, but they would be too small for the c-class anyway.

23 May 2017
The A4 and 3 series have a 1.4 and 1.5 option, the Insigna has 1.4 and you can even get a Mondeo with a 1.0t.

 

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23 May 2017
giulivo][quote=LP in Brighton wrote:

I think it's more about where the gearbox and diff sit compared to the engine.

Well, in both applications the gearbox sits at the end of engine. I'm not an automotive engineer but I don't think it matters a bit. Of course the gearbox has to completely different unit but it shouldn't affect engine a bit. As far as I can see the main difference between engines would be the mounts of the engine, and therefore different engine block.

23 May 2017
More budget Mercedes with Renault engines pile em high and sell em cheapish. Need to keep the stakeholders happy.

23 May 2017
Major Fatty wrote:

More budget Mercedes with Renault engines pile em high and sell em cheapish. Need to keep the stakeholders happy.

Every company needs to keep it's shareholders happy, Daimler-Benz are no different to any other.

Citroëniste.

23 May 2017
I often wonder how many Merc A-Class and B-class drivers know their wonderful German car has a Renault engine?

23 May 2017
Jeremy wrote:

I often wonder how many Merc A-Class and B-class drivers know their wonderful German car has a Renault engine?

I wonder how many owners of the Citan and X-Class know that their entire vehicle is a Renault. You could put a three pointed star on a Tata Nano and see how many badge obsessed punters would fall for it

23 May 2017
Jeremy wrote:

I often wonder how many Merc A-Class and B-class drivers know their wonderful German car has a Renault engine?

I doubt they would care, and why on earth should they?

23 May 2017
The engine mounts will be in a different place. In both transverse and longitudinal cases, the engine teens to be mounted to the front chassis legs or subframe. This means engine mounts on the sides of longitudinal engines, and on one end of transverse engines (the other mount being on the gearbox).

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