Luxury brand no longer considered viable, UK production to end in July
Mark Tisshaw
12 March 2019

Infiniti is pulling out of Western Europe after Nissan’s premium arm was no longer considered a viable business here.

Production of the firm’s two UK-built models, the Q30 and QX30, will end at Nissan’s Sunderland plant in July. The company will cease all European operations from early 2020.

The move is part of a wider global restructuring plan for Infiniti. It will shift its focus to North America and China, and continue its smaller operations in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Asia.

Infiniti launched in Europe and the UK in 2008, but it has never taken off here. The company has just 60,000 customers in Europe, 10,000 of which are in the UK.

The company cites no sustainable way of investing in the kind of technology needed to reduce its fleet emissions in Europe as the chief reason for the move. Like all other car makers Infiniti will have to invest heavily in electrification in order to reduce its fleet emissions, which are mandated at an average of 95g/km of CO2 in Europe from next year.

With the vast R&D sums needed to be invested in electrified technology, and a lack of buyers to help fund the development, the decision has been taken not to invest in the brand in Europe to meet the stricter European targets.

A spokesman said that the targets could be met by Infiniti, like any other car maker, with investment in electrified technology, but there was no viable way of the company to do so.

The early axing of the Q30 and QX30 from Sunderland, which were never big sellers but have been hit further by the drop in demand from diesel, would leave Infiniti with only the Q50 saloon as the sole model in its range.

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Instead, the company will focus on producing more SUV models for China and North America.

Some 250 people work on production of Infiniti models in Sunderland, out of a total of around 7000. Nissan is hoping to redeploy Infiniti staff as much as possible across Europe.

Its dealers will stay open until early next year to work through a transition, and during this period Infiniti will work on a plan to ensure that customers are still looked after in the future for servicing, warranty, aftersales and recall work.

READ MORE

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Comments
40

12 March 2019

Truly awful design, engine/gearbox choice and the final kick in the teeth was the price.

Poor sales for poor cars.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

12 March 2019

Why would people in the UK, who wanted a premium brand, ever buy an Infiniti?

I am surprised they sold any in the first place, can't say I'm sad to see them dissapear, but again, its just another loss of jobs for the UK.

JMax

12 March 2019

true jobs will be lost but the people how have lost thier job could make their own car business with the knowledge they have hahaha

o'IOM

12 March 2019

true jobs will be lost but the people how have lost thier job could make their own car business with the knowledge they have hahaha

o'IOM

12 March 2019

Peter Cavallini is that you writing under a pseudonym? The introspection, unintelligibility of this non-sentence of mangled syntax and grammar are all there. 

13 March 2019

why would that matter freedom of speech and everything. But anyway i dont even know the guy.

o'IOM

12 March 2019

Peter Cavallini is that you writing under a pseudonym? The introspection, unintelligibility of this non-sentence of mangled syntax and grammar are all there. 

12 March 2019

Some of the stuff said on here are opinion just backed up by meagre evidence... 

That answer may never be known, guys hanging around undercover

 

12 March 2019

Nissan are lining this plant up for closure.

 

With their alliance with Renault they have enough capacity in Europe not to have to worry about paying tariffs and extra red tape of producing in the UK after Brexit.

 

Once the current models being built in Sunderland are up for replacement expect the plant to close.   Thank your Leave supporter, and ask them to pay your mortgage.

 

12 March 2019
Symanski wrote:

With their alliance with Renault they have enough capacity in Europe not to have to worry about paying tariffs and extra red tape of producing in the UK after Brexit.

Thank your Leave supporter, and ask them to pay your mortgage.

Well it didn't take long for someone to blame Brexit - I suppose it's easier when you don't bother reading the article or actually thinking about it.

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