Despite a season and a half without victory, Jenson Button tells Autocar how thoughts of retiring from the sport are a long way from his mind
4 July 2014

Jenson Button has competed in more than 250 Grands Prix. He has won 15 of them. He was the Formula 1 world champion in 2009. These statistics place him among the British greats of the sport. 

It may be inconvenient for him that Lewis Hamilton is also around and has won 26 of his 137 starts (but still only one world championship). Button is 34, five years older than Lewis, and he is well aware that people will soon start talking about it being time for him to retire. He knows he needs success, but he also wants people to know just how much he loves being a grand prix driver.

“I still love Formula 1 very much – very much,” admits the McLaren driver. “I love being out there, trying to get the best out of the car and out of yourself. You are still trying to find the limits that you don’t think others can find. I feel like I have just jumped into my first F1 car. 

“The hunger is definitely still there. It hurts when you are not quick, but only one person can win each grand prix, so you have to work hard to get back to doing that. I know that if I don’t do a good enough job,
 I won’t be racing next year. 

“Having been with this team for so many years, and having been through some tough times, I’d love to be here in the future. Looking at the plans they have for the future, I think it is going to be a great place to be.”

At the moment there is a lot of negative talk about Formula 1, but Button doesn’t see it that way.

“I think that the next couple of years are going to be great,” he explains. “We are going to start finding downforce and I really think we will see more teams fighting at the front. I think McLaren will be there. We’re going through a rough patch; every championship-winning team goes through those, but this team will come out the other side.

"Eric Boullier [the new racing director of McLaren] definitely brings good ideas to the team and I think it will work. It’s just going to take a bit of time. It is always more difficult than you think it will be because you are racing against the best teams in the world. F1 is such a competitive sport right now. Sometimes you just don’t get the results, but you are definitely making progress.”

Button now has to cope with rising star Kevin Magnussen as his team-mate, but it is not the first time he has had a tough rival sharing the garage with him. Hamilton was serious competition. Button is watching Hamilton this year with interest. He knows about racing with a dominant car, having won the title with the Brawn-Mercedes in 2009, but he sees no comparison with this year’s Mercedes AMG domination.

Inside Mercedes-Benz's F1 powerhouse

“I remember how much quicker I was than other teams in the races,” he says. “It was two to three-tenths of a second at best. Mercedes are a second quicker than anyone, so it is completely different. We were in a team that was doing a great job but had no future at that time. We started with a great car, an awesome car to drive, but we did not have the development. People were always going to catch us because the team was not willing to develop the car.

"They thought we had done enough, whereas with Mercedes they have the money and the resources and they will keep pushing to the end.

“When you are winning races and suddenly you don’t win, it is difficult. You’re thinking, ‘I’m on a winning streak here, I am strong’, but it goes wrong. It’s an emotional rollercoaster. Lewis and Nico [Rosberg] are both intelligent guys and they are both quick, but sometimes it’s just whose head is in the right place at the right time.

“I think Lewis is unbelievably quick. I said last year, when he had some bad races, that Lewis will shock everyone again with his speed, and he has. He is very quick and his speed gives him confidence. He is a lot more confident than I have ever seen him.

“He was an interesting team-mate. I learned a lot from him and I think he learned a lot from me. If you beat Lewis, you know you’ve done a great job. Throughout our last season he was quicker than me in qualifying, but I scored more points than him over the three years, so I’m doing something right! I think you have to be careful on relying solely on your natural ability.

"That is something you are gifted, but you really have to work on other areas to be a great F1 driver these days. I am always looking for new areas to improve myself. That’s why this sport is great: in F1 there’s always something more to learn.

“Confidence is so important,” he adds. “It’s a big part of the sport. When you have a great car, you are confident, like Sebastian [Vettel] was at the end of last season. It just flows and you keep building the confidence and you always get the best from the car. You don’t make mistakes.”

Over the winter Button lost his father, John, and that means that this year has not always been easy.

“Every race is emotional,” he says. “I see a lot of pictures of him and it is a strange feeling. I am sure we all have that feeling when we lose someone. The British GP is probably going to be the toughest of the year. But F1 is what he loved more than anything in life, and that gives me the feeling that I want to race for longer and longer, because that is the connection I really had with my dad.” 

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Our Verdict

McLaren P1

The stakes couldn't be higher, so has the P1 risen to the challenge?

Join the debate

Comments
1

4 July 2014
What a gentleman, what a good read. The day Button quits the sport I'll cry.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Kia Stonic
    First Drive
    18 October 2017
    Handsome entrant into the bulging small crossover market has a strong engine and agile handling, but isn’t as comfortable or complete as rivals
  • Hyundai Kona
    First Drive
    18 October 2017
    Hyundai's funky-looking Kona crossover with a peppy three-cylinder engine makes all the right noises for the car to be a success in a crowded segment
  • Citroën C3 Aircross
    First Drive
    17 October 2017
    The Citroen C3 Aircross has got funky looks and a charming interior, but it's another small SUV, and another dynamic miss. Numb steering is just one thing keeping it from class best
  • Skoda-Karoq 2.0 TDI 4x4
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Diesel version of Skoda’s junior SUV is unobtrusive and undemanding, but we’d still go for the silkier petrol version of the Karoq
  • Audi Q7 e-tron
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Expensive and flawed but this understated diesel-electric Audi Q7 has a lot to offer