The new Hyundai Genesis saloon will go on sale in the UK in April, with prices starting from £47,995
Darren Moss
29 January 2015

The 2015 Hyundai Genesis will be priced from £47,995 when it goes on sale in the UK this April.

Though long confirmed for the UK market, Hyundai says the delay in bringing models to the UK has been down to the popularity of the left-hand drive Genesis in Europe. The car made its debut at last year's Detroit motor show, and has since been driven by Autocar.

Hyundai will sell the 2015 Genesis in right-hand drive guise from seven specially selected dealers in this country. The near 5.0-metre-long car will become a flagship model for Hyundai in the UK, though officials admit that very few are likely to be sold this year. Instead, Hyundai sees the Genesis as a technology showcase for the brand. It's already known the Genesis coupé won't be coming to this country.

The design of the new Genesis has been modernised for this second generation, the interior is more upmarket, and there are mechanical and technological advances over the outgoing model.

The first-generation Hyundai Genesis arrived in the USA in 2008. The Korean saloon mirrored executive cars like the BMW 5-series but featured pricing inline with the compact executive class. The Genesis ticked most of the boxes on paper but it lacked the cohesive styling and chassis dynamics of the German competition and didn’t offer the option of all-wheel drive which is important for the American market. 

Hyundai calls the design of the new Genesis Fluidic Sculpture 2.0. This is the second phase of the design language first introduced in 2009 on the Sonata saloon, the American version of the i40. The Korean company claims this evolution encapsulates fluid aesthetics, the modern Hyundai look, and a premium ambience.

Inside, special attention has been paid to simplify controls, increase storage area functionality, and give buyers “ultra-precise” fit and finish.

Advanced smartphone apps offer Google Glass integration and can message owners advising the use of the remote engine-starting feature based upon scenarios such as outside temperature and their commuting schedule. A premium navigation system is available with a large, while a 720p high-definition screen and the climate control system utilises a CO2 sensor for increased air quality and driver safety. 

The engine setup is similar to the outgoing Genesis. The base 3.8-litre V6 engine develops 311bhp and 293lb ft of torque. It is available paired with either rear drive or the new “HTRAC” all-wheel drive system. The 5.0-litre V8 - which won't be offered in the UK - puts out 420bhp and solely sends its power to the rear wheels. Both engines feature direct injection and are hitched to Hyundai’s in-house 8-speed automatic. There is no diesel option. 

The styling and technology improvements combined with optional all-wheel drive should dramatically increase the reach of the new Genesis in the USA. The lack of a diesel will limit the appeal in Europe but offering both the steering wheel on the right and official imports is a step in the right direction and an opportunity for Hyundai to move upmarket in the EU. 

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Our Verdict

Hyundai Genesis
The Hyundai Genesis is powered by a 3.8-litre V6 petrol engine

The Korean firm has made progress in its quest to match executive saloons from Audi, Mercedes and BMW, but on this evidence there's still work to do

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Comments
34

24 October 2013

It will be interesting to see what price they ask if they are brought to the UK, with a 5.0-litre V8 producing 423bhp for around £35k and a decent diesel for just over £30k with a full spectrum of kit, one that drives OK and has great finish having the potential to really put the cat amongst the pigeons in the sector.

Landie

24 October 2013

Even the presence of Hyundai and KIA having large vehicles will have the premium German car makers running scared. Hyundai wont sell many in large numbers but will build a loyal following that over time will bring it benefits.

Optima2

13 November 2013
[quote=optima]Even the presence of Hyundai and KIA having large vehicles will have the premium German car makers running scared. Hyundai wont sell many in large numbers but will build a loyal following that over time will bring it benefits.[/quote] This thing, if it is brought to Europe will be £35k+, if they can sell a Focus saloon rival with a 1.7 diesel for £26k, then a fully specced 5.0 litre would be what? In excess of £40k? £50k? I actually had a prolonged spell in an Optima last week and can't say I was too impressed. Everything feels hollow, and sounds it too. The diesel was weak and breathless. The ride is ok, but manages to be bouncy and send judders through the cabin on poor roads. Perhaps the result of too firm dampers for the springs. And the seats are overly firm, but not in a good way. I felt perched on top of them and they felt really flat. Then there is the infotainment system. I don't know who designed it but the logic behind it is a nightmare. It reminded me of Samsung when they first copied Apple, and the menu systems just weren't quite right. I suppose for a cheap family car, it is ok. But as anything more, it fails.

28 November 2013
Marj, in response to your comment. The Optima is far larger than a Focus saloon, its even larger than a Ford Mondeo. I have an Optima 3 which I bought last year and my wife has a 1 yr old VW Passat Highline. We both agree that pound for pound the KIA wins hands down, factor in that it has more kit as standard that are options that would have sent the Passat to well over £35000, it has a 7yr warranty, 5 yrs service plan and a solid reliability. My original quote was to say that if the Genesis was to come over here to the UK the German premium car brands will have to look over their shoulders. Hyundai and KIA have come along way and are going to have to be taken seriously over the next few years. 5 years ago I would not have entertained either and would have stuck with my VW's but having owned the Optima for 18 months I have changed my mind. Yes they may not beat the Germans at the moment but with every new model and with every new owner the tide will change. I for one would buy the Genesis if it was sold in the UK and if they sold it in estate form my wife would change her VW Passat.

Optima2

30 November 2013
[quote=optima]Marj, in response to your comment. The Optima is far larger than a Focus saloon, its even larger than a Ford Mondeo. I have an Optima 3 which I bought last year and my wife has a 1 yr old VW Passat Highline. We both agree that pound for pound the KIA wins hands down, factor in that it has more kit as standard that are options that would have sent the Passat to well over £35000, it has a 7yr warranty, 5 yrs service plan and a solid reliability. My original quote was to say that if the Genesis was to come over here to the UK the German premium car brands will have to look over their shoulders. Hyundai and KIA have come along way and are going to have to be taken seriously over the next few years. 5 years ago I would not have entertained either and would have stuck with my VW's but having owned the Optima for 18 months I have changed my mind. Yes they may not beat the Germans at the moment but with every new model and with every new owner the tide will change. I for one would buy the Genesis if it was sold in the UK and if they sold it in estate form my wife would change her VW Passat.[/quote] Agree absolutely with what you say. Alas, people's perceptions take time to change, as evidenced by all the shrill cries of 'Hyundai copies the designs of X and Y' - obviously there are many who are discomfited by the prospect of a Korean company producing compelling, top-end luxury cars and muscling into a market to which they thought it did not belong. Fear and loathing usually bring out the blinkered, spiteful attitude in people, and my guess is that this will continue as long as Hyundai/Kia continue their rise to the top.

15 January 2014
MaxTorque wrote:
optima wrote:

Marj, in response to your comment.
The Optima is far larger than a Focus saloon, its even larger than a Ford Mondeo. I have an Optima 3 which I bought last year and my wife has a 1 yr old VW Passat Highline. We both agree that pound for pound the KIA wins hands down, factor in that it has more kit as standard that are options that would have sent the Passat to well over £35000, it has a 7yr warranty, 5 yrs service plan and a solid reliability.
My original quote was to say that if the Genesis was to come over here to the UK the German premium car brands will have to look over their shoulders. Hyundai and KIA have come along way and are going to have to be taken seriously over the next few years. 5 years ago I would not have entertained either and would have stuck with my VW's but having owned the Optima for 18 months I have changed my mind. Yes they may not beat the Germans at the moment but with every new model and with every new owner the tide will change.

I for one would buy the Genesis if it was sold in the UK and if they sold it in estate form my wife would change her VW Passat.

Agree absolutely with what you say.
Alas, people's perceptions take time to change, as evidenced by all the shrill cries of 'Hyundai copies the designs of X and Y' - obviously there are many who are discomfited by the prospect of a Korean company producing compelling, top-end luxury cars and muscling into a market to which they thought it did not belong.
Fear and loathing usually bring out the blinkered, spiteful attitude in people, and my guess is that this will continue as long as Hyundai/Kia continue their rise to the top.

I don't think you can compare the the Optima with an 8 year old Passat ( it was launched in 2005). Of course it should be better. If you can spend £28k on a Optima, you can definitely spend a lot more on a Genesis or i -whatever it will be called. I wouldn't say I am biased, I remember the Pony. I remember the Estelle 1200 but like Skodas, what does that say? It is just that it 'looks' more than it is at the moment. Scratch beneath the surface and it just felt a bit of a fake, especially with the 9-5 inspired exterior and interior. (the design staff is largely ex PSA and SAAB). It is not about being blinkered, it is about car manufacturers knowing that they cannot simply build 'prestige'. Heck it has taken Lexus long enough. It is more than the curve of a line or the soft touch of a piece of plastic. Perhaps I am a snob, I drive a Mercedes, but I will not be going for the new C-Class. There is just something over -studied about these modern Kias and Hyundais that unsettles me. Surely they have enough rich historical culture to draw from without tapping into someone else's. I almost wish Bangle got Schreyer's job, at least we would have something original, not thwarted dreams of Peugeot stylists. They also don't have the depth of engineering found in other brands. I would put my neck out and say that Renaults are better engineered than these. They are close, but it all seems a little too contrived for me. There is no passion, no hutzpah.

25 October 2013

If those sketches are reflective of the new Genesis, then it shows Hyundai still feel the need to derive their styling cues from other manufacturers. Those sketches have strong hints of Audi with the crease along the side nicked straight from BMW. The current Genesis is a mix of previous 5-Series and Lexus LS. Come on Hyundai, if Kia can do striking and almost unique looking cars, so can you.

13 November 2013
[quote=Lanehogger]If those sketches are reflective of the new Genesis, then it shows Hyundai still feel the need to derive their styling cues from other manufacturers. Those sketches have strong hints of Audi with the crease along the side nicked straight from BMW. The current Genesis is a mix of previous 5-Series and Lexus LS. Come on Hyundai, if Kia can do striking and almost unique looking cars, so can you.[/quote] I quite agree, I think the comment: "Hyundai is aiming to emulate the performance and handling abilities of its German rivals with the new Genesis, with prototypes being benchmarked against current BMW 5-series models" should have read, Hyundai have just copied a 5 series with elements of 7 series to rival the Germans. I have to say, slightly disappointed with the looks of this thing. It looks dated already, never mind in a year's time.

29 November 2013
[quote=Lanehogger]Those sketches have strong hints of Audi with the crease along the side nicked straight from BMW. [/quote]I agree with you. I think the A7, 5-series, Rapide and the Jaguar XJ are all represented in this design. But I think because it melds shapes so many other cars it is not so flagrant in its mimicry. [quote=Lanehogger]The current Genesis is a mix of previous 5-Series and Lexus LS. Come on Hyundai, if Kia can do striking and almost unique looking cars, so can you.[/quote] That's a salient point in regards to Kia. The K5, K7 and K9 are attractive designs and not simply copies of other marques' products. In my opinion, the route of the Hyundai Avante, Santa Fe and Sonata are what Hyundai should be aspiring to. Al this being said, this new Genesis looks to have an appealing shape.

27 October 2013

Lexus started off copying Mercedes with their game-changing first generation LS in the early 90's.
This new Genesis looks like they are repeating history by solidifying their presence in the luxury market by creating an Audi A7 copy.
Hyundai had a lot of promise with creating their own attractive styling with the current Sonata, Elantra and Veloster. Even Hyundai's sister company, Kia has gone through a breakthrough with their new stunning corporate design direction first seen in their current Optima model.

The Genesis always had an identity issue as it borrowed styling cues from various other luxury car manufacturers but resulting in a very generic-looking product. So I don't know why Hyundai has continued to go in this direction instead of continuing the design success of their other models.

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