Four RCA designers show off their visions for a future Bentley
2 February 2010

Prospective Bentley designers have shown off their vision for a future how a future Bentley should look.

Four of London’s Royal College of Art (RCA) Vehicle Design Course masters students have been shortlisted from 18 entrants in the Bentleys of the Future competition being run in conjunction with the Crewe-based company.

Two of the four entrants will win a six-month secondment at Bentley’s design studio working under head of exterior design Raul Pires.

Pires has already helped the students refine their designs and extensive aerodynamic work on the student’s concepts has taken place in a virtual wind tunnel.

Dale Harrow, head of the RCA, said: “Working with Bentley has inspired these young designers to create a coupe for the 21st Century that embraces the latest aerodynamics technology.

“The Vehicle Design Course attracts postgraduate students from across the world and it has been fascinating to see them make a connection with a British marque that has such a distinguished heritage.”

The four finalists are Bora Kim, David Seesing, Marten Wallgren and Mikka Heikkinen.

Korean Kim’s entry allows the user to select their preferred engine for any particular journey, while Swede Wallgren has created his vision for the next Continental GT.

German Seesing’s and Finn Heikkinen’s designs are both built around maximising aerodynamic efficiency.

“The RCA has an enviable reputation for attracting some of the best young design talent, with many of their graduates going on to work for the world’s leading car manufacturers,” said Pires.

“The outstanding quality of work meant we have offered an extra place. These four finalists have captured the essence of our brand, recognising what makes a Bentley instantly recognisable on the road.

“Just as importantly, they’ve grasped that excellent design should always seek to enhance a car’s handling and performance, as well as optimising its environmental credentials.”

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Comments
3

2 February 2010

Hmmm I know they are only styling drawings, not drawings of how a finished real car (with door openings etc) would look. But I really really like the first picture. The rest, I dont like, Im afraid.

As for "Korean Kim’s entry allows the user to select their preferred engine for any particular journey", wouldnt a selective cylinder shutdown system achieve the same result? Only without the owner having to store a garage full of spare engines, an engine hoist, and a lot of spare time? Or is that just me being too logical? lol

currently a happy owner of a Mitsubishi Shogun Pinin :)

2 February 2010

[quote roverfan1984]As for "Korean Kim’s entry allows the user to select their preferred engine for any particular journey", wouldnt a selective cylinder shutdown system achieve the same result? Only without the owner having to store a garage full of spare engines, an engine hoist, and a lot of spare time? Or is that just me being too logical? lol[/quote]

Maybe he's thinking about all those spare engines being made in Korea?

Not altogether sure that a garage full of spare engines squares too readily with students appreciating that "excellent design should always seek to enhance a car’s handling and performance, as well as optimising its environmental credentials” either.

As for the designs - well they're the usual design nonsense, aren't they? Intended only to emphasis the features that are to be accented. Apparently the design brief was to represent a Bentley as a cross between that Merlin-engined Rolls-Royce that some nutter built in the 60s/70s, an 80s Corvette, the Batmobile, and a kitcar - I'd say that they were bang on the nail but I wouldn't touch one with yours, let alone mine ! However, if toned down, I'd say that the inference is a large, low, muscular, sporting coupe with 2 suicide doors. An interesting proposition, and something that I'd say would be downright pleasing to see on the roads occasionally.

2 February 2010

Im liking the muscular rear haunches and the back end in pic 3. Something about its stance reminds me of those landspeed cars ,and there's a gentle recognition to the E type at the rear

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