It may only seem like yesterday that the global car industry was falling apart faster than a Hollywood marriage, but that's old news apparently.

The last couple of days seems to have been all about recoveries and stabilisation - suddenly the glass in half full again.

Rightly, we should be sceptical of any claims of green shoots of recovery, but the good news does seem to be everywhere.

The Honda factory in Swindon reopened a few days ago after a four-month shutdown due to a collapse in demand for new cars.

Ford is set to increase US production of cars and trucks by ten per cent year on year, in a bid to gain market share from rivals Chrysler and GM.

And there's more - the restructured Chrysler is getting ready to re-open most of its factories by the end of June.

Meanwhile, there's even a cheery spin being put on the fact that US car sales have fallen again, with analysts saying the fact they that had dropped less than expected was a 'positive' sign.

Over here the dealers can't get the rare classics down the scrap yard quick enough to replace them with shiny new cars. Scrappage might be working.

It many ways it seem like this positivity is infectious and almost being encouraged, to show the car buying public that things are going to be alright, especially if they pop into their local dealership.

But the question is, do we, the people who actually have to part with our credit crunched cash to pay for these things, feel more like buying a brand new car now than we did a few weeks ago?

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,