From £33,371
Subtle changes aim to bring the sports saloon closer to the Jag XF

Our Verdict

Infiniti G Series 2009-2013

The Infiniti G-series is well equipped and is offered with a high-class cabin. It is pricey though

24 May 2010

What is it?

This is the revised Infiniti G37 saloon. The most obvious differences from its predecessor are in the nose, where the headlight clusters mimic the look of its sister coupé, and in the cabin, whose centre console has been upgraded to a deliver the Europeans-style sophistication of the EX37.

What’s it like?

The driving experience is unchanged dynamically, which is a good thing. The four-wheel steering, which has the most natural feel of any on the market, allows the car to feel as nimble as a hardcore sports saloon but with a more compliant ride.

What makes the difference is the revamped interior, with a tasteful, full-length aluminium insert running up the centre console from the gearstick and well-chosen glass black plastics. The entertainment system has also been upgraded to the one found in the current EX37, with more readable graphics, speed camera warnings, and a inclined keypad as well as a touchscreen.

The Premium edition we tested, also bundles in the Connectiviti pack, allowing you to easily connect iPhones and the like for properly integrated music and phone calls, though these options can also be specced separately on the standard model.

The paddle-shift auto ‘box can be a bit uncouth when the car is driven gently, with some slow shifts and unmatched engine speeds, but as soon as you begin to get the car on the boil and take the engine over 3500rpm - not even halfway to its rev limit - the problems go away.

Our one big reservation is still the 3.7-litre V6 petrol engine. It’s great fun having a proper, naturally aspirated motor, but the UK market is crying out for the 3.0-litre diesel that’s working its way through the Infiniti range.

Should I buy one?

The natural competitor to the G37 is the Jaguar XF, in terms of size and mission. Thanks to its four-wheel steering, the Infiniti feels significantly more agile in a ‘chuckable’ way, though, ultimately, the Jag’s chassis is as well resolved. Where the Jag really scores is with its fine diesel engine, and with UK fuel prices it would be hard not to see the appeal.

Join the debate

Comments
20

27 May 2010

You must wonder at the marketing /PR department, to introduce a £40K car into the UK, with no history , no diesel option, and ask top money. Do they actually think they will sell many. UK is the grave yard for non German hopeful marque brands, just as the French, Honda Legend, etc , etc.

The car looks nice, but to make it attractive pricing needs to more in line.

We may moan about the Germans, but they get the model line ups right, 2.0 litre diesel , etc, this what makes companies buy them.

3.7l petrol in UK market at £6 per gallon.

Why these companies work this way, this is not the USA .

If they can introduce a Diesel, reduce prices, improve showrooms, etc, then it might just work.

jer

27 May 2010

Harsh but true. Head would rule heart no matter how much fun it could be, you'd have to be mad to buy one of these at 30k never mind 40k. I'd also question if this is stylish enough, no great shakes to me, it's the Primera that never was. Is it really an XF competitor or a 335i market?

jer

27 May 2010

One remark on fuel economy petrol vs diesel. I've noticed my 530d on a cold winter morning after being left ourside it gives dismal economy until warm. 15ish. It takes approx 10 miles to get above 20 mpg and if the journey is long enough it can eventually get to 37+ mpg. The reasons are I think because the thermal efficiency of diesel takes it longer to warm up the oil. Petrol 330i I never oberserved to be so badly effected in the warm up phase, perhaps because petrol is less thermally efficient. I wonder if in the shortish journeys, real world, use if a Petrol is closer to to diesel than the laboratory figures?

27 May 2010

[quote Elvisisntdead]Elvisisntdead wrote the following post at May 27, 2010 10:38 AM:

You must wonder at the marketing /PR department, to introduce a £40K car into the UK, with no history , no diesel option, and ask top money. Do they actually think they will sell many. UK is the grave yard for non German hopeful marque brands, just as the French, Honda Legend, etc , etc.

The car looks nice, but to make it attractive pricing needs to more in line.

We may moan about the Germans, but they get the model line ups right, 2.0 litre diesel , etc, this what makes companies buy them.

3.7l petrol in UK market at £6 per gallon.

Why these companies work this way, this is not the USA .

If they can introduce a Diesel, reduce prices, improve showrooms, etc, then it might just work.

[/quote]I agree, most of the Jaguar XF's sold in the UK and Europe are diesel. A 3.7 petrol car in Europe will not sell. Just look at Mercedes, BMW and Audi sales figures in Europe to see that diesel power dominates across premium car sales.

27 May 2010

If they actually sell* more than 50 of these in this country i'll be gobsmacked. It'll be rarer than a Phantom.

*Not dealer self reg's with massive disciounts etc.

27 May 2010

1) This car appeals greatly as it offers a competitive package in terms of raw product while being distinct and interesting.

2) Isn't this the 3 series rival, not the 5 series (that would be the M saloon, no?). Therefore the equivalent Jaguar would be......oooops, sorry.

Competance executes, character inspires

27 May 2010

In the U.S. the G37 is more of a 3-Series, C-class et al competitor, Infiniti's M goes against the XF.

28 May 2010

I like it a lot, of course, it´s a no brainer, that buying a car like this will burn cash fast, but if I had the money, I would choose a car like an Infiniti rather than an Audi or BMW or Mercedes. At least one has the feeling that your driving something special. But good thing I don´t have the cash to burn.

28 May 2010

It's a God awful clone of a BMW and a Mercedes, it's as anonimous as an Insignia, you wouldn't look twice, the Infiniti might be a sought after Brand in America, but i'd like to think that in Britain and Europe that we were a bit more interested in what our car's look like , interiors aren't the only selling point for cars you know!

Peter Cavellini.

28 May 2010

[quote Peter Cavellini] interiors aren't the only selling point for cars you know![/quote]

Good job, this looks like any old japanese car.

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