Currently reading: Youxia Ranger X - China's Tesla Model S copycat revealed
Youxia Ranger X looks almost identical to Tesla's electric saloon and will go on sale in China later this year
Darren Moss
News
2 mins read
28 July 2015

These are the first pictures of the Youxia Ranger X - a Chinese-made copycat of the Tesla Model S.

Its makers say the Ranger X, which looks almost identical to Tesla's executive saloon, is powered by an electric motor producing 352bhp and 325lb ft, with electricity coming from a battery pack mounted under the floor. The saloon is capable of reaching 62mph in 5.6sec and has a range of 286 miles in top-spec form.

Youxia also says the Ranger X features technology used on the BMW i3 and the Model S. The company says the car’s handling has been developed by “the world’s leading engineering companies”.

Safety technologies include adaptive cruise control and lane-keeping assistance.

By comparison, the entry-level Tesla Model S is powered by a 324bhp electric motor and is capable of reaching 60mph in 5.2sec, with a top speed of 140mph. 

Inside, the Ranger X features a large central screen, reminiscent of that found in the Tesla, and includes sound symposers to make its engine note sound like other cars.

Youxia’s owner - 28-year-old Huang Xiuyuan - is reportedly a big fan of the 1980s TV programme Knight Rider, and has included in the car elements inspired by the show. The company's name, Youxia, is apparently the title of the Knight Rider programme in China.

The car's front bumper even features an LCD panel that is capable of recreating Kitt’s oscillating LED lights. The Android-based operating system used by the car’s infotainment services is also called Kitt.

Production of the Ranger X is due to begin later this year, with Chinese media reporting that the car will be priced from around $32,000 (about £20,497). In the UK, the Model S costs £45,800 including the government's £5000 EV grant.

Tesla declined to comment on the car when contacted by Autocar.

Copycat design in China has recently been highlighted with the Land Wind X7, a clone of the Range Rover Evoque. Jaguar Land Rover boss Ralf Speth has said companies are "powerless" to stop Chinese manufacturers from copying their designs, after JLR’s challenge against Land Wind was thrown out by the Chinese courts.

Earlier this year, Chinese car designers hit out over claims that copycat designs were once again becoming more prevalent in the country. Speaking at the Global Automotive Forum in June, Changan design boss Chen Zheng said: “We have a lot of copycats but we also have a lot of audacious designs. Globally there are also disputes and arguments over similar designs. 

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"The truth is that car designs are becoming more and more homogenous. The situation is chaotic."

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scotty5 31 July 2015

Which one costs £45k?

To these eyes the Tesla looks like the £20k effort whilst the Chinese car looks £46k. Seen a few Tesla's around these parts, I love the concept and I love the engineering behind it, but it looks like a rep-mobile totally devoid of character. The Far Eastern effort is in a different league altogether.
ahaus 29 July 2015

It's actually nice and not too much like a Tesla...

Other than the front grille and the large touch pad interior, it is not as blatantly a Tesla copy as some of the other car maker copies from China. I also see some Toyota and Lexus design influences as well.
I like the functional raised centre console which is lacking in the Tesla, which creates more of a cockpit environment.
It's actually quite a nice design.
If they can create an original looking grille and integrate the touch pad more with the interior it would be an original design that they could proudly call their own.
vroom 28 July 2015

Copying

150 years ago it was the US that was accused of copying Britain, in the 50's and 60's everyone accused Japan of copying everyone else. Cherishing the principles of copyright protection seems to be a skill that countries develop as soon as they have something worth stealing. The Chinese will get there soon enough. And by the way, it doesn't really look much like the Tesla. More like a bad day in the Toyota or Honda design department.