Japanese brand has gone petrol-only in the UK as the deadline to register pre-WLTP cars looms
21 August 2018

Subaru has removed all of its diesel-engined models from sale in the UK, in a move likely to be caused by the incoming WLTP emissions test regulations.

The Japanese brand's latest models, the Impreza hatchback and XV SUV, were introduced without the option of a diesel engine. Now, all references to the 2.0-litre boxer diesel unit previously offered in the Forester and Outback have been removed from Subaru's website. 

The move comes as a surprise, because the oil-burning variants of Subaru's largest models were the volume sellers in the range. Buyers of the Forester can now only choose a 2.0-litre boxer petrol engine, with or without a turbocharger. The Outback's sole engine choice is a naturally aspirated 2.5-litre petrol mated to a CVT gearbox.

Subaru's decision to drop its 2.0-litre diesel engine is almost certainly due to it not meeting the standards of the WLTP (Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicles Test Procedure) regulations, which come into force next month.

Many manufacturers are being forced to re-engineer powertrains to ensure published CO2 and fuel economy figures don't increase dramatically under the new regime.

Dealer stock of diesel Subarus is still available to buy, but no pre-WLTP cars can be registered by manufacturers from 1 September.

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Comments
13

21 August 2018

 No, not really, in a twisted way, Deisel could be the downfall for all Fossil fuelled vehicles, as Battery tech improves getting more range better charging methods and so on will over the next decade make Fossil fuelled Cars if you like what Electric Cars are now, I was dubious at first but I’m coming round to the idea my next. At might be Electric.....

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Peter Cavellini.

21 August 2018
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 No, not really, in a twisted way, Deisel could be the downfall for all Fossil fuelled vehicles, as Battery tech improves getting more range better charging methods and so on will over the next decade make Fossil fuelled Cars if you like what Electric Cars are now, I was dubious at first but I’m coming round to the idea my next. At might be Electric.....

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Dunno why it took you so long to come around to the idea of electric. However, killing diesel now simply undoes the last 20 years of reducing CO2 emissions from transport - CO2 is going up and will continue to rise for a long, long time yet, thanks to the anti diesel lobby. The correct way to phase the market to electric is to keep diesels meeting Euro 6d and gradually phase them out as electric vehicle sales rise, not suddenly pull them all/most from the market. Only climate change denyers and people with axes to grind cos theyve always hated diesel despite the CO2 reductions they bring, can be happy with the current, mad situation.

XXXX just went POP.

22 August 2018
I'm no fan of diesel.

But the way government has done this, from nearly forcing people to buy diesel 2 years ago, to demonizing it now, sums up very perfectly why big government is not the answer to most questions.

21 August 2018

who buy new Subaru's currently it could be a bit of a shock.

Going electric would make a lot of sense for this mark as their IC engines are at best average.

For the car buying public in general buying electric will only make sense while there are few on the road. Once a figure, that may be as low as 10%, is reached expect government legislation for increasing the costs of vehicle charging and compulsory use of smart charging meters.

Based on experience my advice would be to buy a good diesel now with the idea of keeping it 10 or 15 yrs. In 5 yrs time the reduction in diesel use will bring down it's cost relative to petrol and diesels will still exhibit their trademark driving characteristics of good real word ground covering ability and economy.

You will then benefit from 8/10 years of cheaper motoring without having to burn chip fat.

I will be looking for a nice 2.0 tdi with about 150 bhp and a manual box while prices are artificially low. ;-)

22 August 2018
That pre-supposes a nice 2.0 tdi exists.

21 August 2018

Which? Magazine has just published a test which shows conclusively that EU6d diesels are producing far more pollution than they should some up to 25 times the amounts allowed. The website Real Diesel Emissions also proves that all diesels are producing far more CO2, NOx and soot than claimed or allowed. So when people suggest letting diesels carry on to keep some esoteric CO2 measurements low until BEVs are developed to a useable state they are wrong. CO2 levels are not going to rise by any measurable amount in the 5 years since dieselgate or the last 18 months or so since diesel sales started to decline or the filthy things started getting legislated off the road. That is nowhere near a long enough period to measure. CO2 might be increasing but that is mainly because of fossil fuel power generation in China, India and other areas and due to non-road traffic related issues. In 100 years that might mean something or more likely nothing much at all.  Diesels though are killing people right now as a coroner has recorded in London last month in the first death directly linked to diesel emissions. Banning diesels cannot come too soon. 

21 August 2018

The 2019 Forester, as announced in Japan, includes a 2.0 litre hybrid or a 2.5( non-turbo). I would guess the hybrid is quite likely for the UK, eventually for all Subarus as they move to the new common platform as already used on the Impreza and XV.

21 August 2018

I wish Subaru would put a decent tax efficient petrol engine into the Levorg, then it might start turning up on some company car lists.

21 August 2018

There cannot be too many of the run out turbo model left either.

If I want an autonomous car, I'll take a taxi.

22 August 2018

I spoke to Subaru staff at the Goodward Festival Of Speed last year and was informed that the 1.6 petrol turbo engine as is fitted to the Levorg will not find it's way in to any other car in the current Subaru range.

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