LWB version of the Range Rover, measuring over five metres long, spotted, showing Land Rover's intentions for the car

This is the long-wheelbase version of the new Range Rover, which is expected to be publically revealed later this year. It's the first factory-produced stretched model since the short-lived LSE version of the original Range Rover.

It is well over 5.0m long and has been produced not just for the Chinese luxury market but also as a direct rival for more conventional executive limousines, such as the new Mercedes-Benz S-class and even Rolls-Royce models.

Judging from these spy photographs, much of the extra length has been fed into the rear cabin, as is clear from the exceptionally long rear doors. It also appears that this Range Rover’s rear overhang — and, therefore, the boot space — has been marginally extended.

Range Rover is likely to offer this stretched model in the very highest interior specification, along the lines of the Autobiography Ultimate Edition that was launched at the end of the life of the Mk3 Range Rover. That model featured a teak-lined boot, individual rear seats and rear-mounted iPads on top of the standard Autobiography specification.

Land Rover has long wanted to explore how far upmarket the Range Rover concept can be pushed. This car not only has huge rear cabin space but also has the advantage over conventional luxury saloons of a higher and more upright seating position. Even at a likely price of more than £125,000, this Range Rover could offer a good deal of the Rolls-Royce experience at a significant discount.

Our Verdict

The fourth-generation Range Rover is here to be judged as a luxury car as much as it is a 4x4

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Comments
12

30 July 2013

The LWB LSE was produced from 1992 to 1995:

http://www.automobile-catalog.com/make/land-rover/range_rover_1gen/range_rover_1gen_lwb/1992.html

30 July 2013

"...there really is no escaping its size up close. Especially in a standard-edition British car parking space, which it fills with all the cramped awkwardness of Sherman Klump on a bus seat."

"...it remains a fat fish out of water. "

The above remarks were directed at the Mercedes-Benz GL-Class, which is about 5.1m long.  I can only assume that a completely unbiased review of the LWB Range Rover will make the same sort of comments.

Oh, look.  A flying pig!

30 July 2013

I am in complete agreement with disco.stu. You blasted the GL for its size from beginning to end about how unsuitable it is for British roads. Not only will this new porker be longer but it is some 10 cm wider than the GL. Long live the objective review...... Smile

GeToD

 

30 July 2013

Didn't take long to restore some of that weight they managed to loose. Now all they've got to do is make it a bit wider and taller to keep the proportions intact... 

30 July 2013

Exactly  autocar were critical the GL for being bulky, wide etc...  at least it looks in proportion, as much as  I like th RR this just looks like a cut and shut job! yet they are calling this creation Extrodinary!!!

I have seen the GL on the road and to be honest it looks fine..no  bigger than other large Suvs such as Q7 or Land Cruiser..

Trying not to egt on Autocar biased badn wagon too much, but they do keep shooting themselve sin the foot with the ' we love anything brit' and all else is inferior..if the Brits do it good if the others produce something similar its wrong!

30 July 2013

Important vehicle for the important Chinese market, where they love LWB vehicles for their prestige.

30 July 2013

Have Rangerover spent all the time developing a carthat is supposed to be peerless offroad, lumbered it with all the extra weight the offroad hardware obviously adds, and then stretched it so that it would be useless offroad because its wheelbase is too long, which will probably end up with it being beeched, think back a couple of months the Obamas limo getting grounded on a speedbump  

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=obama+stuck+on+speed+bump&docid=4966151506953417&mid=036F3FBD7923350F7A87036F3FBD7923350F7A87&view=detail

30 July 2013

for Range Rover to compete with the S class,  it has to produce a car like this.  If I were an Oligarch, (or royalty), I would much prefer to be chaffeured in a Range Rover,  extra height to look down on the 'plebs', more comfortable seating position. 

I agree, even the standard RR is too wide and long for British roads in the same way a Porsche or Ferrari is a ridiculous proposotion for any public road, unless you really think 200mph and 0-60 in under 4 seconds is somehow relevant...well unless you like long prison sentences.

We should all be driving Skodas and Golfs,  but sensible is boring.  I for one love the choice!

 

 

30 July 2013

In Britain this is about as appropriate as a bouncy castle at a funeral.

Nevertheless, I think this is where the high-end Range Rover should be focused on rather than those daft RS-badged things.


30 July 2013

Put the registration number into the MyCarCheck iPhone app and the power unit is quoted as a 3 litre "electric diesel"

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