Creator of the road-legal McLaren P1 GTR hints at a production car lap record attempt when final set-up testing gets under way

The road-legal LM version of the McLaren P1 GTR is set to go for a Nürburgring lap record attempt during a stint of development testing planned for later this year.

Lanzante, the Hampshire-based firm responsible for creating the road-legal LM versions of McLaren’s 986bhp track model, will run the car at the Nürburgring to finalise its set-up. Lanzante says a lap record isn’t a priority, but if the conditions are right, an attempt is a possibility.

“We’ve seen what the road car is capable of there and we’ve got simulations of what our car can do,” said company boss Dean Lanzante. “Kenny Bräck is doing all of the driving, so if an opportunity arose, we have the right man for the job.”

McLaren declined to reveal the Nürburgring lap time of its standard P1, instead choosing only to confirm that it dipped below the seven-minute mark. But Lanzante’s words suggest he’s confident the P1 LM is capable of beating the 6min 57sec time of the current production lap record holder, the Porsche 918 Spyder.

Despite his confidence, Lanzante concedes that the P1 LM’s chances could be hampered by time constraints and weather conditions.

“We don’t have the finances or the time to do something like Porsche,” he said in reference to the 918’s testing programme. “If it rains, the track isn’t fast enough, so we can’t do a lap. And we don’t want to do a Koenigsegg…”

Koenigsegg recently crashed a One:1 at the ’Ring ahead of its own record attempt and has to rebuild the car before it can run again. Lanzante says his company can’t afford the same fate, instead ranking delivery of all five P1 LMs to their customers as a priority.

Each P1 LM could receive minor changes to its factory settings after delivery, including the fitment of ‘evolution’ parts or minor geometry adjustments.

“Whatever upgrades we develop in testing, we give to the customer,” Lanzante said. “It’s part of the package; they don’t pay for that.”

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Comments
7

25 August 2016
While this should and probably will easily beat 6:57, to me this story confirms the standard P1 when released could not.

25 August 2016
McLaren say the the P1 went comfortably below 7 minutes but the car was in race mode which is more extreme than anything offered on the 918 and the car is not road legal in that setting as its to low to pass pedestrian impact laws. Same with La Ferrari which is why that's never been run. Lanzante will be running a customer car and they would only need to raise the ride height by a cm or two.
Would like to see supercar driver put all three cars round the ring, would bet my house McLaren would be quickest. Look up P1 vs 918 vs La Ferrari on YouTube and watch the supercar driver, three films, McLaren blitzed all of the except 0-60 which the 918 won thanks to superior traction (897 horses across 4 wheels is far easier than 917 across two)
Love a double six

26 August 2016
This is all smoke and mirrors. The more you optimize a car for the circuit, the worse it becomes for the road, and vice versa. So if it's that important to you, build a racing car and do the minimum necessary to make it road legal, even though it would be road awful. Then there's tires. Who really buys into this sort of willy-wagging?

26 August 2016
This is all smoke and mirrors. The more you optimize a car for the circuit, the worse it becomes for the road, and vice versa. So if it's that important to you, build a racing car and do the minimum necessary to make it road legal, even though it would be road awful. Then there's tires. Who really buys into this sort of willy-wagging?

26 August 2016
This is all smoke and mirrors. The more you optimize a car for the circuit, the worse it becomes for the road, and vice versa. So if it's that important to you, build a racing car and do the minimum necessary to make it road legal, even though it would be road awful. Then there's tires. Who really buys into this sort of willy-wagging?

26 August 2016
Thank you Autocrat for tripling my post. Sigh.

26 August 2016
Also thanks to spell check

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