Nissan's cult Cube will go on sale in UK in 2009
19 November 2008

Nissan's Cube will go on sale in the UK next year as the firm launches the cult car outside the Japanese market for the first time.

The new car, which loses some of the second-generation Cube’s square looks, is based on a new chassis that could be used in the next Micra, continuing Nissan’s tradition of using the supermini as a platform for quirky low-volume cars such as the Figaro and Pao.

Although its wheelbase is only 10mm longer than a current Micra’s, at 2530mm, the Cube is 261mm longer than the hatchback. Power comes from a 1.5-litre diesel motor or a 1.6-litre petrol unit coupled to a CVT gearbox; no manual option is planned.

British buyers will benefit from a wraparound rear window that does away with a D-pillar to improve visibility for drivers of right-hand-drive versions. Also at the rear of the car, the new Cube retains the current model’s side-hinged tailgate.

Inside, it’s a little less unusual, with a simple dash and fascia design incorporating a wave effect, although there are some neat touches, such as the different colours for the speedo and rev counter (white and blue) and customisable dash coverings; owners can choose from materials such as shag-pile carpets and wood-effect trim. Exterior graphics will also be offered.

Cubes built for the Japanese market will have a new type of catalytic converter that uses fewer precious metals such as platinum and rhodium.

The car goes on sale in Japan next month, the US at the beginning of next year and in the UK around November 2009. An electric version is also in the works; Nissan previewed the new Cube with an all-electric concept car earlier this year.

Nissan UK has yet to decide how much to charge for the Cube, but expect it to be priced to compete with cars such as the Mini.

Dan Stevens

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Comments
13

19 November 2008

Why?

In the UK this car will only be bought by 120 year old men with enormous ears, therefore the market for such a product is very limited.

19 November 2008

[quote oaffie]

In the UK this car will only be bought by 120 year old men with enormous ears, therefore the market for such a product is very limited.

[/quote]

I'm not so sure. It may be a niche product but I think the audience will be younger than you would imagine.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

19 November 2008

I love the statement, 'it has lost some of the squareness of the 2nd generation Cube'.....really, has it?? I saw this and thought, oh the Cube has new headlights.....but no, it is all new!!!

So it has lost maybe 0.000001 of its Cubey looks for the 3rd incarnation. Wowzers!

This car will not work here, there are not enough Japanese people in the UK. It will not even be bought by 120 year old men with radars for ears as they will find the Cube (priced as it will as a boutique car rather the odd transport box it is) too expensive and stick with their Perodua Nippa's.

19 November 2008

[quote TegTypeR]I'm not so sure. It may be a niche product but I think the audience will be younger than you would imagine. [/quote]

Exactly.....!

My kids 6 & 3 love this, it costs me a fortune in 20p's outside Boots every Saturday, until I get fed up ofthe arguments as to whos turn it is to sit next to Postman Pat. I will get some exclusive 'spy' shots at the weekend.

Actually I really do agree, it oozes that individuality that so many people crave (hence the Fiat 500 toaster, Mini's with Albanian flags painted on the roof etc) It will be cheap to insure, big enough for 20 year olds to hold an orgy. Its got to be easy for the nervous ones to drive, no sticky out bits when your parking. Can't wait for the GT-R version!

19 November 2008

I think it could find a market in the UK. Here in Japan the avergae age of Cube owners is probably around the mid-twenties. Owners seem to be a pretty equal balance of men and women. But I have been surprised at the number of male drivers (I can report that some may have had big ears also). Everyone seems to customise them inside with dash coverings and I think that will appeal to young people everywhere. Personally I hate them. They are usually driven by people who think themselves rather trendy - but seem oblivious to the fact their car is so, so close to simply being square...

19 November 2008

I like the idea of shag-pile carpets. Not so keen on the new front - I think I prefer the old one there, but I do like the new back, and the subtle curves. Still, I have to say I find it slightly clinical in places. Maybe that's just the photography.

"The creative adult is the child who survived."

19 November 2008

[quote stevied]seems to customise them inside with dash coverings and I think that will appeal to young people everywhere.[/quote]

I ran out of reading material the other day and found myself in a news agents looking at Banzai, a Japanese car and tuning mag. One of the features was a twin test between the Daihatsu Materia and the Nissan Cube (Mk1). Cutting the story short, the review praised both the cars, but suggested to make them more desirable for the younger generations the handling should be tweaked and engines a bit more powerful.

If they can get that licked then they'll have a winner, from what I've read.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

19 November 2008

Love it!

Ok, won't be going out to buy one (only 108 and ears too small) but it could find more friends than people think - the headlining is bonkers - but probably a tactile treat on a long journey!

I can see why some people may ask "why?" - but I'd ask that of the Mini Clubman.

Makes you wonder where Kia started with the Soul....

20 November 2008

[quote TegTypeR]be younger than you would imagine. [/quote]

I think you might be right - just look at who buys Toyota's scion in the States - 18 to 25 year olds.

20 November 2008

Yes, but that is the US where kids going to Uni get given brand new Honda Civic's to drive there in. Japan and the US are different markets, cars like this and Scions work in those markets where small Japanese cars are cool. Do you remember the Daihatsu YRV?? Youth Recreational Vehicle....I don't recall seeing one in the UK driven by someone under the age of 65.

European teenagers want Beemers or hot hatches made in Europe. Honda's are becoming fashionable....but the stigma of them being old peoples cars is still alive and well. If we are still driving cars in 20 years time and not reduced to horse and cart by various governments the small quirky Japanese car may become popular in Europe!

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