Restored Range Rover, chassis number #001 which was built in 1969, heads to auction with an estimated price of £100-£140k

The first production Range Rover will be offered to buyers at an auction in London on 4 September.

Estimates suggest that the Range Rover, which established the market for luxury 4x4s and is now an iconic British car, will sell for between £100k-£140k.

The Range Rover, which carries the chassis number #001, was built in late 1969 and registered on 2 January 1970.

Michael Furlong, who produced promotional films for the Range Rover, was the first owner. By 1975 the car had changed hands and been resprayed Bahama Gold, another official colour.

Further registration plate, colour and owner changes meant that the car was 'lost' for several years, until it was identified again in the early Nineties.

The 3.5-litre V8-engined Range Rover was then the subject of a professional ground-up restoration, which resulted in the car being returned to its original condition – including a respray in its factory Olive Green colour.

Despite the Range Rover's age it has retained its original chassis, engine, gearbox, axles, shell and reputedly its original aluminium bonnet. Its condition, and matching-numbers status, serve to further increase both its appeal and potential value.

The Range Rover – which bears the registration plate 'YVB 151H' – will take part in the Salon Privé sale, hosted in partnership with Silverstone Auctions, in London on September 4th.

Nick Whale, managing director of Silverstone Auctions, said: “It’s wonderful to be able to offer this iconic British model for auction at the UK’s finest concours event.

"These cars are incredibly popular and we expect a significant amount of interest when it goes under the hammer.”

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13 August 2014
... Presumably en route to the auction photo shoot in Oxon recently. Funny as I mentioned then how those old Rangies were probably getting quite valuable!


13 August 2014
....the Velar's (pre production and pre naming), have been making very big money for a while now, so it was only a matter of time before the first production models really took off. They have been making £40k+ for a while, so I can quite see how 001 is worth a fortune....amazing that it has survived really.
I had an early RR in the mid 70's (a 71 I believe), in Masai Red. No PAS, (about 5 turns from lock to lock!), no electric windows/carpets/central locking...only extra on it was green tinted glass - fantastic vehicle, and unstoppable off road.
Looking at these pictures with the original 'hose out interior' makes you realise how far divorced from the original product we have come. Makes me wonder if there isn't a market for this again, maybe with the addition of A/C to combat the plastic seats!

13 August 2014
289 wrote:

Makes me wonder if there isn't a market for this again, maybe with the addition of A/C to combat the plastic seats!

But, of course, now they'd be called "faux leather", and would be a cost option...


15 August 2014
.....vert true Catnip, very true :-)
Have you also noted the latest 'make a quick buck ruse?........ Charging extra for white non metallic paint and calling it 'special white' !!! Cashing in on the resurgence in popularity of the colour.
Remember white, black, red and 'doom' blue (so called in the trade because it was unsaleable secondhand), were the only colours available in the past to those unwilling or unable to fund metallic paint. So clever huh, call it 'special' and charge £250 for it. God the buying public are gullible!

13 August 2014
I love the look of this, the simple but elegant lines, which make todays model look so bulky and excessive. Everyone moans that the MINI has grown so much and is nothing like the original, but I think the same applies here.

13 August 2014
To see what it does bring. This is the first production model of a true automotive icon. The fact that the definition of luxury at that time wasn't particularly luxurious is an interesting footnote but that is like noting the paucity of niceties in the first Mini Cooper from 1961 compared to the current version. Part of me laments that this RR has/will become a trailer queen but part of me feels it has likely deserved a retirement from the rough and tumble life.

13 August 2014
Indeed. Perhaps JLR could get that Brazilian VW factory that only recently ceased producing Campers to produce a stripped-out Mk0 version using hitherto redundant components? Re-importing them to compete with the Defender would be fun!

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