BMW i3 will cost from £25,680, first deliveries expected in October

BMW's i3 city car will cost £25,680 when it goes on sale at the end of this month. That price includes the government's £5000 electric vehicle grant.

That price is for the pure-electric version, with 168bhp and a top speed of 93mph coming from its synchronous electric motor. 

Rivals to the i3 include the Nissan Leaf, priced at £20,990 including the electric vehicle grant, and the Chevrolet Volt at £30,255, again inclusive of the grant.

The i3 is based around BMW's 'Life Module' concept, and uses a carbonfibre reinforced plastic body structure. It rides on a chassis made of almost pure aluminium.

BMW has yet to release official prices for the range-extender model, although it is believed to command a significant premium over the base model of the i3.

Autocar recently had the chance to drive a prototype of the i3, where it transpired to be a practical and individual alternative to existing city cars.

Order books for the i3 will open towards the end of this month, with the first deliveries expected in October.

Our Verdict

BMW i3s

Revised hatchback sets out its range-extended electric stall in a new, sportier tune

Join the debate

Comments
20

Myk

22 July 2013

The Nissan Leaf is now dead in the water.

Not sure how BMW have pulled that off considering the expensive materials used to build it.  Are they losing money on them to give a competitve edge?  Not really like BMW.

I still think pure electric cars are almost pointless, but if you were going to buy one it would be the i3, surely.

22 July 2013

Myk wrote:

The Nissan Leaf is now dead in the water.

Not sure how BMW have pulled that off considering the expensive materials used to build it.  Are they losing money on them to give a competitve edge?  Not really like BMW.

I still think pure electric cars are almost pointless, but if you were going to buy one it would be the i3, surely.

They are probably making a massive loss on each one, the same as Audi did with the original A2. It has a feint wiff of Vanity Project about it. Still, if this can make electric vehicles acceptable to the masses, then that's ok by me. 

Myk

22 July 2013

marj wrote:

They are probably making a massive loss on each one, the same as Audi did with the original A2. It has a feint wiff of Vanity Project about it. Still, if this can make electric vehicles acceptable to the masses, then that's ok by me. 

I would agree on both points. 

Making a loss is something I don't associate with BMW, who seemingly can charge whatever they want for a product and get away with it. 

It would seem in this case that they really want to establish themselves as leaders in this field and are willing to punish their rivals on price to do so.

In one fell sweep they're making the Leaf all but obsolete.  Yes, it's range might be slightly greater, but if you're in the market for a pure EV then a few miles isn't going to make a whole load of difference.

22 July 2013

I will be seriously tempted by one of these at that price.

22 July 2013

Price might be lower than they’d wish because the range appears to be less than the Leaf, looks like Nissan is ahead of BMW in that respect.

Anyhow the plug in takes another bound forwards! 

 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

22 July 2013

Given that BMW/MINI will be sharing a front-wheel-drive platform for its 1-Series, I hope that the i3 provides some 'design' inspiration for it ... The current 1-Series is utterly mediocre, so something a bit more funky would sell like hot cakes ... 

22 July 2013

I applaud the engineering but would not buy one . If it gets pranged that carbon fibre will cost a fortune to repair .

Leasing may be a way around prospective repair costs . I wonder how insurers will view this car . EVs seem very expensive to insure so far .

Myk

22 July 2013

Old Toad wrote:

If it gets pranged that carbon fibre will cost a fortune to repair .

I've been wondering about this with the Alfa 4C as well.  I guess it will depend whether the carbon structure could be replaced in small sections.  I would assume that someone like BMW would be mindful of such a thing when producing a "cheap" carbon car.

22 July 2013

Myk wrote:

Old Toad wrote:

If it gets pranged that carbon fibre will cost a fortune to repair .

I've been wondering about this with the Alfa 4C as well.  I guess it will depend whether the carbon structure could be replaced in small sections.  I would assume that someone like BMW would be mindful of such a thing when producing a "cheap" carbon car.

With the 4C I'd guess those possible costs would be included in the (no doubt high) insurance costs but not sure where that'd leave the BMW because I'd imagine it being fairly cheap to cover.

TBC

22 July 2013

The big question is what the price difference between this and the RE version will be. As a pure run-around-town car, this will sell well, however, for those that wish to venture further the RE looks to be the one to go for. If the pricing for the RE version is not too great a jump, BMW could be onto a real winner.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Jaguar E-Pace 2018 review hero front
    Car review
    20 April 2018
    Can Jaguar’s compact SUV bring flair and dynamic polish to a fast-growing class?
  • Audi TT RS Coupé
    First Drive
    20 April 2018
    The Audi TT RS has the looks, a vociferous engine and the supercar-baiting performance, but is it too uncompromising to use as a daily driver?
  • Lamborghini Urus review 2018 hero front
    First Drive
    19 April 2018
    The supercar maker's new 4x4 is massively capable wherever it goes, while being extremely conspicuous and costly while it does it
  • Skoda Kodiaq
    First Drive
    19 April 2018
    High-spec seven-seater Kodiaq begins its family life with a lot to prove — for Skoda and SUVs
  • Ford Focus RS Race Red Edition front
    First Drive
    18 April 2018
    Ford drafts in some tasty extras for this limited-run Focus RS swansong edition