Jaguar is setting the bar high for their BMW 3-series rival; promising innovative technology, the most desirable design and a car that “feels more alive” than rivals
Jim Holder
15 April 2013

Jaguar’s BMW 3-series rival must be “extraordinary” if it is to have any chance of sales success, according to Jaguar Land Rover CEO Ralf Speth.

Test mules for the junior saloon have already been spied testing and the car is expected to go on sale in 2015. 

“If we do such a car, it is clear that our rivals have incredible design, incredible cars to drive and incredible strength,” said Speth. “We must create something that can rival that, which means our product must be extraordinary, but I also want our cars to deliver a human quality that sets them apart. Jaguar’s strength is its people, and our products must reflect that.”

Jaguar boss Adrian Hallmark added that the key attributes of the 3-series rival must be that it is better to drive, feature more advanced technology and have a more alluring design than any of its rivals.

Although he acknowledged that the likes of the 3-series, Audi A4 and Mercedes-Benz C-class represent formidable opposition, and that their makers can fall back on larger economies of scale to drive costs down, he denied that the compact executive saloon market was unconquerable.

“The key has been getting the F-type at the heart of our range,” said Hallmark. “It stands for everything Jaguar is about and is utterly distinctive. It is the purest expression of what all our cars should be about. Now we must apply that strategy to forthcoming cars, including the baby saloon. The headlines of that car must be innovative technology, the most desirable design and a driving sensation that makes the car feel more alive than anything the opposition has to offer.”

The small Jaguar saloon is expected to sit on JLR’s highly scalable Premium Lightweight Architecture (PLA) aluminium platform and be built at the firm’s Castle Bromwich plant, which would then be able to run at full capacity. By combining the lightweight platform with latest-generation four-cylinder engines, Jaguar hopes to outscore the dynamics and efficiency of its rivals.

“Selling cars is competitive, and it’s no good expecting to walk in and steal your opposition’s lunch,” said Hallmark. “But we have a view on how we can differentiate ourselves from them, and we believe that at the end of the scale Jaguar will sell in, which is traditionally the higher price point of the market, we can win customers by being distinctive, by avoiding being aloof and by standing for something that is just a little bit different.”

The baby Jaguar is expected to evolve into a full line-up of body styles, including an estate, coupé and convertible. Jaguar is also tipped to be developing a crossover in tandem with the baby saloon, with the styling and capability focused more around on-road dynamics than any serious off-road capability. It is likely to be launched in 2016 or 2017.

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Comments
37

15 April 2013

F-Type is 300kg more than its rivals, despite being made from aluminum. But that won't stop the UK press, and Autocar in particular, waxing lyrical about how good it is (I'll read the US press for a more-objective, neutral, opinion)

This new baby Jag needs to avoid the same weight mis-management; but JLR record is not good, and I'm sure it'll be a bit porky compared to 3-series, C-class and A4

15 April 2013

a point of view i have being trying to bang home for months, hence my user name!

twitter @anikadamali, @notPCnairobi

15 April 2013

soldi wrote:

F-Type is 300kg more than its rivals, despite being made from aluminum. But that won't stop the UK press, and Autocar in particular, waxing lyrical about how good it is (I'll read the US press for a more-objective, neutral, opinion)

This new baby Jag needs to avoid the same weight mis-management; but JLR record is not good, and I'm sure it'll be a bit porky compared to 3-series, C-class and A4

Let's see what the motoring press think when they drive the car. If you want biased motoring journalism, then look at the German press. The German cars ALWAYS come first.

You seem to be an expert on the F-type and Jaguar 3 series, when nobody outside of Jaguar has driven them.

15 April 2013

The main reason the F-Type is so heavy is because it is based on a shortened XK platform, which is around a million years old! I think they should have gone the other way, developed this new platform first and made it from there.

 

If the new platform is as light as they are suggesting, then things could be very promising.

15 April 2013

Roc R wrote:

The main reason the F-Type is so heavy is because it is based on a shortened XK platform, which is around a million years old!

Won't stop Autocar pronouncing the F-Type the best sports car in the world, single-handedly beating the Boxster, Cayman, 911 and GT86 in one go.  I'm sure it will leave many people scratching their heads - how can a car that weighs 300kg more and using an ancient chassis beat the current crop of lightweight specialists.

Autocar, I really hope you don't blow your credibilty, even if JLR pays your flights to New York, etc.  [btw Jim, what was the answer to that?  Did JLR pay for you to go to NY? ]

15 April 2013

soldi wrote:

Autocar, I really hope you don't blow your credibilty

says the guy who thinks he can get a straighter opinion from US media. Pull the other one.

No real world owner cares which car is heavier (are you serious?) or whether it's marginally less or more expensive to run - just forum bores such as yourself whose opinions are backed up by nothing more than loose change. Opinions that incidentally come across as far more riddled with prejudice than any article.

Many real world owners want to hear everyone's thoughts on what they might be buying next, whether that's mixed views from Autocar or Motor Trend, or what their VW obsessed next door neighbour and the guys at work think, and then find out for themselves and make their own minds up.

In short, it doesn't matter. Autocar is many things but it's only biased in the minds of presupposing blowhards as the not-as-good-as-the-BMW XF Sportbrake review should have told you.

15 April 2013

ThwartedEfforts wrote:

says the guy who thinks he can get a straighter opinion from US media. Pull the other one.

No real world owner cares which car is heavier (are you serious?) or whether it's marginally less or more expensive to run

Are you serious? 

US publications do not have a partisan stake in their reviews. I think many would agree that Autocar can be biased by UK products

Sorry, but real world owners will care about weight. Too much weight spoils the drive experience and has a negative impact on fuel economy and CO2.  Most cars sold in this sector are company cars where owners and fleet operators look at the numbers under a microscope.

If you seriously believe a heavier car will succeed, then you are mistaken. The Jag needs to be light with good CO2 and good driving performance. Otherwise it will only appeal to a very small part of the market

17 April 2013

soldi wrote:

Are you serious? 

US publications do not have a partisan stake in their reviews. I think many would agree that Autocar can be biased by UK products

hahahahaha. US publications make money selling ad space to the car industry same as everybody else and prostitute themselves about Detroit, cramming their pages with advertorials far more than anything you see on UK shelves.

You don't know the exact weight of a nonexistent car in the same way you don't know its CO2 figures. Complaining peevishly about bias before you've even seen it in action is of course a preconception in itself, something you and the other trolls don't seem to appreciate.

Any small Jaguar is an important car for the UK and UK industry. If you don't like the fact the UK press is keen for it to succeed then perhaps you had better stick with Road & Track.

15 April 2013

I think the baby Jag will do well .

It wont be German for starters . I do think size and price will be two major factors . Dont make it too big and lardy maybe slightly smaller than the curent crop of A4 C class 3 series but with better packaging .

Jag big weakness are its engines that are not competitive at the moment . Needs to have low CO2s for the company purchase . 

Oh and puleeese dont make it "aggressive". This seems to be an obsession at the mo . Classy trumps aggressive anyday .

15 April 2013

I see the Jaguar haters are up early this morning. This is really boring, Autocar hasn't been around so long by being in anyone's pocket. The new Cayman had a rave review and the F type isn't out yet, so let's give it a chance, eh? A great car is more than the same of weight and power, haven't you learned any thing from the new Toyota GT86.

 

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