New 565bhp, 201mph V12 Vantage S Roadster is Aston Martin's fastest drop-top yet

The potent Aston Martin V12 Vantage S sports car has spawned a new roadster variant, the fastest open-top model ever produced by the company. 

The V12 Vantage S Roadster shares its mechanical make-up with the coupé, so power comes from a mighty 565bhp 5.9-litre V12 engine. The new Aston can crack 0-60mph in 3.9sec and reach a top speed of 201mph, figures that are just shy of the 3.7sec and 205mph of the coupé.

The engine’s torque output is also prodigious, at 457lb ft, and 376lb ft is available from just 1000rpm. Drive is sent to the rear wheels through a race-derived Sportshift III seven-speed automated manual transmission that is supplied by Graziano. 

The adoption of a retractable fabric roof has added 80kg to the kerb weight, taking it to 1745kg. However, that figure is 20kg lighter than the previous V12 Vantage Roadster, produced in 2012. Apart from the roof, the roadster is identical to the coupé.

Adjustable chassis features include Bilstein three-stage adaptive dampers, a three-stage dynamic stability control system and a two-stage ABS set-up, traits that are changeable through selecting one of the three driving modes: Normal, Sport and Track.

A further Sport driving mode is also offered. This adjusts the level of power steering assistance from the Servotronic system, the sound from the lightweight sports exhaust (an exhaust system derived from the One-77), the speed and timing of the gearshift and the throttle response.

Standard equipment includes carbon-ceramic brakes. On the options list are lightweight 10-spoke alloy wheels and an Interior Carbon pack.

Aston Martin’s bespoke Q arm is also offering special exterior and interior colour and trim options.

Watch our video review of the Aston Martin V12 Vantage S coupé below.

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Our Verdict

Aston Martin V12 Vantage S

This is the latest and greatest Aston Martin, which is pitched straight at the likes of the Porsche 911 Turbo

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Comments
11

16 July 2014
I like it but, frankly, I'm unlikely to buy one. Nevertheless, it would be nice if the article mentioned the price.

16 July 2014
It's definitely an Aston Martin.

16 July 2014
why did it take so long to put the parts bin together to do that one?

16 July 2014
Aston Martin have been treading water with the same old models for some time now. Maybe they need taking under the wing of a larger manufacturer (Mercedes, maybe) and enjoy an injection of cash to develop some new models. Hasn't done Lamborghini any harm.

16 July 2014
Beastie_Boy wrote:

Aston Martin have been treading water with the same old models for some time now. Maybe they need taking under the wing of a larger manufacturer (Mercedes, maybe) and enjoy an injection of cash to develop some new models. Hasn't done Lamborghini any harm.

IMO, it's done Lambo a lot of harm, although it took a while. The new Huracan sounds like it's been seriously watered down based on the reviews -- the excitement, the rawness, the stuff that made a Lambo a Lambo has been seriously diluted. Speaking of dilution, the Huracan will share its platform and engines with the new R8. At least the Gallardo started out as a Lambo -- it was only later in life that it donated its platform to the R8. I don't want my Lambo to also be an Audi -- it ruins the specialness. I hope Aston doesn't suffer a similar fate as the M-B deal comes into play.

17 July 2014
...Lamborghini would probably still be launching another "limited edition" Gallardo every few weeks. While the Huracan may share many of it's parts with a future Audi, it is, to me anyway, unmistakably a Lamborghini. I don't see a future Aston Martin that shares many components with a high end Mercedes a bad thing, particularly if it still looks like an Aston Martin. Climbing in to bed with a large manufacture may mean the odd compromise but that needn't be seen as a bad thing.

17 July 2014
And if Porsche didn't build SUVs and sedans there would be no money for sports cars, right? WRONG. It's a load of BS (the sports cars are very profitable on their own and have been for 20 years). I own an Aston, and an "Aston" that shares major components (engines or platforms) with a high-end Benz would NOT be an Aston, and I won't be a buyer. The point of an Aston is that it IS an Aston -- not something else. Just looking like one isn't nearly enough. Yes, Aston needs the help of a large firm, but that firm needs to be a benefactor (like Ford was) and NOT a platform-sharer. Would you buy a Ferrari that was a Benz under the skin if it looked like a Ferrari? I wouldn't. The Huracan would be far more interesting to me if it weren't also an Audi. It would probably also be a more interesting drive if Audi didn't own the company. Perhaps more accurately and to the point, it would be a more interesting car -- and a better Lamborghini -- if Audi left the Lambo guys alone to build the car they wanted to, rather than one that has to appease Audi.

16 July 2014
Line up all the new models released over the last 5 years, and they all look the SAME.....! At least Ferrari have imagination and flair..!

16 July 2014
cousinbillybob wrote:

Line up all the new models released over the last 5 years, and they all look the SAME.....! At least Ferrari have imagination and flair..!

Ferraris are also loud -- literally and figuratively -- and in-your-face. Astons are understated, elegant and classy -- and gorgeous. Look a little more closely -- they don't look "the SAME." It's really not difficult to tell one from another. Great design is enduring and doesn't need to be constantly changed. Astons are still the best looking cars on the market IMO.

17 July 2014
About an Aston not being an Aston if it were to share some of its DNA with another high end sports car and I respect that. I am merely suggesting that given access to Mercedes' funds, tech, development, etc Aston MAY actually build a better car than they would if they were to continue to go it alone. I admit I don't know as much about Astons as you do but don't they have previous in this field? Wasn't the DB7 very closely related to the Jaguar XK8? Didn't they plunder the Ford parts bin for switchgear? Admittedly, Aston Martins aren't really my bag but I would hate to see them struggle on for the next few years continuely tweaking the same ageing models with vents and spoilers. I hope they do continue to build great cars and if they do get into bed with Mercedes I genuinely hope they build a great car that would meet with your approval, after all, what really gives a marque it's pulse is it's enthusiasts.

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