Production version of Shanghai concept will be launched in China later this month
13 November 2009

Shanghai Automobile Industry Corporation (SAIC) is set to revive the famed Morris Garages (MG) name when it reveals a production version of the MG 6 at this month’s Guangzhou motor show.

The five door fastback, previewed in concept car guise at the Shanghai motor show last April, is the first new MG model to appear since the sale of the former British car maker to Nanjing Automobile in 2005 prior to a subsequent takeover by SAIC two years ago.

Up until now, Nanjing Automobile and SAIC have been content to sell re-badged versions of former Rover models as well as a lightly re-fettled version of the TF roadster in a bid to keep MG afloat.

However, the planned appearance of the MG 6 at Guangzhou signals a new beginning for the company founded in Oxford in 1924.

According to SAIC president, Chen Hong, it is the first of range of contemporary new MG models, including a new entry level model based on SAIC’s Roewe 350 which is also planned to get its first public airing in Guangzhou, with the objective of re-establishing the once highly regarded British marque.

Initial sales of the MG 6 will be restricted to China, says Hong, but SAIC officials contacted by Autocar confirm it has been engineered to comply with European and US safety regulations. Still, no official announcement on export plans is expected to be made until its unveiling on 23 November.

Styled at SAIC’s UK headquarters in Warwickshire, the MG 6 represents a clear break from earlier MG models with a fresh looking exterior and modern interior – all aimed at appealing to a much younger audience than recent MG models.

At 4653mm in length, 1827mm in width and 1478mm in height, it is marginally longer and wider but slightly lower than the Skoda Octavia.

Buyers will get the choice of two 1.8-litre four-cylinder engines – the same all-aluminium units used in the company’s strong selling Roewe 550, a car with which the MG 6 shares much of its mechanical architecture.

In range topping turbocharged form, the four-valve-per-cylinder engine with variable valve timing delivers 160bhp and 158lb ft of torque, while a naturally aspirated version kicks out a more subdued 133bhp and 125lb ft. Among the gearboxes on offer will be a five speed automatic from Japanese specialist, Aisin.

Greg Kable

Twitter - follow autocar.co.ukSee all the latest MG reviews, news and video

Join the debate

Comments
35

13 November 2009

These cars the most refined out of the Chinese Makes, nice. Tons of reliability problems I hear though.

13 November 2009

Garbage. No-one should buy this heap.

Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells.

13 November 2009

[quote macaroni]Let the Chinese build their own heritage and not drag ours through the paddy fields.[/quote]

The heritage of Third World technology and engineering now being produced in the Third World. Latter-day Rover should be forgotten to save all of us embarrassment.

13 November 2009

When one sells his heritage he should know that the buyer would take it wherever he pleases, and if that means going through paddy fields, so be it.

I don't believe China is a paddy field, though. And it is not the new Korea/japan. It is far bigger than both and will become even bigger as a country and as a force in world economy. You shun it and it's influence in future at your own peril.

13 November 2009

A small and no doubt unimportant point, but why is it called the MG6 when it has a 4 cylinder engine?

Lanciaman

13 November 2009

[quote Lanciaman]A small and no doubt unimportant point, but why is it called the MG6 when it has a 4 cylinder engine?[/quote]

Because presumably it slots into the MG line-up between the MG5 (the old MG ZS - nee Rover 45 hatch) and the MG7 (the old MG ZT - nee Rover 75), both of which are built and sold in China.

Bizarrely, though, there's also the MG3 SW - which is an MG-badged version of the 25-based Rover Streetwise (hence 'SW') - a really odd addition to the MG range, even by Chinese standards.

13 November 2009

[quote boggle]I don't believe China is a paddy field, though. And it is not the new Korea/japan. It is far bigger than both and will become even bigger as a country and as a force in world economy. You shun it and it's influence in future at your own peril.
[/quote]

I think we should shun Rover's depressing, archaic design. Shunning China is almost impossible, even if you wanted to. However, using Rover platforms does hint at the mindset of Chinese industry and the products it manufactures. You often buy those at your peril.

13 November 2009

[quote HyundaiSmoke]Tons of reliability problems I hear though. [/quote]

That will be the Rover / MG bits then, like the engines ..... I am sure the Japanese tranmissions are fine, and the BMW engineered body / chassis is fine ....

Looks nice ... will sell well in China and other places. Will not sell in Europe because it is a Chinese car priced at MG / European levels. If it is priced too cheaply ... it won't sell as people will ask what is wrong with it!!

13 November 2009

I cannot beleive the negative comments. I understnad that the engineering of this car is by Ricardo in the Midlands, for those who don't know these are highly repected BRITISH engineers. MG may now be a foreign brand but who cares. We still buy MINI's, Bentleys and Jags who are all foreign owned. As long as the product is good and provides Longbridge with a chance to prosper again then whats the problem?

Personally, I feel MG should be used as a test bed for new green technology and not only can they re-launch the brand but it can gain a whole new image for a new generation.

By the way, would all Kia and Proton drivers swap their wheels for a well engineered and well priced MG? I bet they would as they would not have to explain to their friends why they chose that car!!

13 November 2009

[quote HyundaiSmoke]

These cars the most refined out of the Chinese Makes, nice. Tons of reliability problems I hear though.

[/quote]If you were to flip over any random household item there's a high chance you'll find a MADE IN CHINA label on the bottom. The laptop I'm using now has one and a separate one on the battery; no doubt there's another out of sight on the flat panel screen. Is it unreliable? No! And lest we forget, 'quality' is often rooted in prejudice rather than in reality - look at some of the overpriced junk from Audi or Mercedes if you're in any doubt. And even if reliability is a short term concern, the biggest worry over a longer period is what will happen to industries elsewhere in the world once China gets the hang of building our cars as well as our PCs.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Jaguar F-Type 2.0
    Car review
    24 November 2017
    Downsizing reaches Jag’s svelte F-Type coupé — but it’s more appetising than it sounds
  • Borgward BX7
    This is the Borgward BX7, a new SUV from the Chinese-owned brand
    First Drive
    24 November 2017
    The return of the Borgward brand is spearheaded by the BX7 SUV, a worthy Chinese equivalent of the BMW X3 and Audi Q5
  • Mercedes-Benz E-Class L
    This is the Chinese-market extended wheelbase Mercedes E-Class L
    First Drive
    24 November 2017
    Mercedes-Benz's decision to extend the wheelbase of the E-Class for the Chinese market is an inspired one, judging by our brief test drive
  • Aston Martin Vanquish S
    First Drive
    24 November 2017
    We bid Aston Martin’s era of VH-based cars a fond farewell, and what better way than by living with its Vanquish S super-GT for six months
  • Volkswagen Golf MHEV
    First Drive
    23 November 2017
    VW's 48V mild hybrid technology is still a few years away from production, but we’ve sampled a prototype Golf fitted with it and are suitably impressed