Energy recovery system is tipped to make the coupé Alfa’s most potent road car yet

Alfa Romeo is developing a new Giulia coupé that features a Formula 1-style energy recovery system (ERS), according to Autocar’s sources.

Two powertrains are said to be under development using the system. One is based on the 276bhp 2.0-litre turbo petrol engine used in the Giulia Veloce saloon. The other uses the 2.9-litre turbo petrol V6 of the Giulia Quadrifoglio.

The 2.0 version develops around 345bhp combined, and the 2.9 V6 a mighty 641bhp to create the most potent road- going Alfa Romeo yet, with an output only 20bhp short of the 661bhp Ferrari 488.

Among its potential direct competitors, BMW’s M4 DTM produces 493bhp (454bhp in CS form), the Audi RS5 444bhp and the Mercedes-AMG C63 S Coupé 503bhp.

The Giulia coupé could appear towards the end of this year and go on sale in 2019.

Rumoured in some quarters to be badged Sprint – although GTV would be historically more appropriate – the coupé is derived from the Giulia saloon (pictured below).

The forward set of exterior panels are likely to be carried over, but there will be a new rear roofline, different rear quarter panels and longer doors to ease access to the rear seats. Alfa will likely be keen to provide good rear-seat accommodation. Its previous GT model provided excellent accommodation for a coupé and sold better as a result. A new nose design, to distinguish the coupé from the saloon, is also likely.

The Giulia coupé will probably have a conventional boot, but it’s conceivable that Alfa might develop a five-door hatch version to compete with the Audi A5 Sportback and the BMW 4 Series Gran Coupé, a derivative that would significantly widen its appeal.

A conventional Giulia engine range is also likely to be offered, consisting of the 197bhp and 276bhp 2.0 turbo petrols and the 503bhp Quadrifoglio V6. The 148bhp diesel is also a possibility.

The ERS may well be a development of the HY-KERS set-up developed by Ferrari and Magneti Marelli for the LaFerrari, which, the company claims, is more advanced than the type used in its F1 cars. It is performance rather than economy and emissions oriented, the electric motor’s ample low-end torque complementing the petrol engine’s torque curve, which is fatter at higher revs.

Nevertheless, the ERS powertrains will produce fewer emissions and better fuel consumption than conventional engines of similar outputs. Installation of the system is likely to present Alfa Romeo with quite a packaging challenge. The motor, control systems, inverter and battery pack will all need to be accommodated and there might also be a liquid cooling system to optimise battery performance and durability, as with the LaFerrari.

The launch of these high- performance hybrids should do much to bolster Alfa Romeo’s already improving reputation for competitive hardware, potentially helping to give the brand the kind of technological lead it enjoyed in the 1960s. 

Read more 

Alfa Romeo Giulia review 

Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio review 

Alfa Romeo 4C review

Our Verdict

Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio

Alfa Romeo returns to the super-saloon class, but does the Giulia Quadrifoglio have enough about it to dislodge the Mercedes-AMG C63 and BMW M3 off their perches?

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Comments
30

5 April 2018

 Yep, I think so! Far to much power when you consider that if you have the means you could buy one an hour after you passed your test!, if there is going to be Cars like this then a graduated license has to be considered, that way no matter how deep your pockets you can only drive what you have the experience for, yes by all means go on an advanced drive course because if Cars with this kind of performance are available driving courses are a good idea....

Peter Cavellini.

5 April 2018
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Yep, I think so! Far to much power when you consider that if you have the means you could buy one an hour after you passed your test!, if there is going to be Cars like this then a graduated license has to be considered, that way no matter how deep your pockets you can only drive what you have the experience for, yes by all means go on an advanced drive course because if Cars with this kind of performance are available driving courses are a good idea....

Gave up on ridiculously fast cars when I realised that most of the time I was driving it in stop-start urban traffic or on rural roads stuck behind a Nissan Qashqai doing 40mph.

5 April 2018
WallMeerkat wrote:

Gave up on ridiculously fast cars when I realised that most of the time I was driving it in stop-start urban traffic or on rural roads stuck behind a Nissan Qashqai doing 40mph.

Why? You can't overtake in a fast car?

5 April 2018
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Yep, I think so! Far to much power when you consider that if you have the means you could buy one an hour after you passed your test!, if there is going to be Cars like this then a graduated license has to be considered, that way no matter how deep your pockets you can only drive what you have the experience for, yes by all means go on an advanced drive course because if Cars with this kind of performance are available driving courses are a good idea....

I can see a time quite soon when semi-autonomy prevents the full performance being used on most public roads. Like drones that can't go near airports because their software won't allow it, no matter how foolish the operator. This kind of thinig would have prevented the fatal wrong-way motorway crash in Bradford this week. Humans aren't to be trusted really. We need lots of assistance.

 

 

289

5 April 2018

I agree Peter. This ridiculous pissing contest with brands upping the anti in BHP terms is out of control.

Fantastic though this car will be, it is a ridiculous amount of power and complexity....and Kers has been pretty unreliable in F1 even with an army of doting race mechanics surrounding each vehicle, (not to mention the danger to life from electric shock), so I fear that this will be a step too far.

I applaud Alfa Romeo for trying to set the bar high and produce a coupe that the public will desire, but as a road car - where are you going to use it...not just in the UK.....even in Germany the opportunities to really turn the taps on are few and far between with the quantity of traffic these days.

I have always said that the right to drive super powerful cars should be earned rather than bought.....it is quite irresponsible of any government to expect that a learner driver can jump from learning in a low powered puddle jumper to a supercar with over a thousand horsepower on passing a test, with the only entry qualification being the financial clout to afford it.

25 April 2018

My view is that there are two basic reasons for having this car;1To use on track days.2All that power is like having a massive bank balance, it's it's there when you need it.Enjoy it for what it is,a great piece of automotive engineering. 

garage man

5 April 2018
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Yep, I think so! Far to much power when you consider that if you have the means you could buy one an hour after you passed your test!, if there is going to be Cars like this then a graduated license has to be considered, that way no matter how deep your pockets you can only drive what you have the experience for, yes by all means go on an advanced drive course because if Cars with this kind of performance are available driving courses are a good idea....

Pete you can be relied upon for being sensible. Sadly the powers that be dont even use the same latreens !!! Not only do we need a graduate license, but also a system whereby NO insurance company will accept a driver under 30, no matter how deep daddies pockets may be (or even their own if so successful they can afford one). Kids must learn that it is NOT a iicense to drive, it is a license to KILL and they have a huge responsibility to themselves and the public

what's life without imagination

5 April 2018

Oh man - this will be an incredible car. 

5 April 2018
If a company like Alfa which is on the ropes can produce this , why no XE/XF Coupe from Jaguar ? Now they are making lots of money from SUV's like everyone else they can perhaps afford to stretch the range ?

5 April 2018
Sundym wrote:

If a company like Alfa which is on the ropes can produce this , why no XE/XF Coupe from Jaguar ? Now they are making lots of money from SUV's like everyone else they can perhaps afford to stretch the range ?

Not exactly on the ropes, mismanaged and under invested.

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