Currently reading: 2020 Ford Focus gains mild hybrid options, new Zetec variant
48V technology comes to Ford's family hatch, replacing 1.5-litre engine for claimed efficiency boosts of 17%
Felix Page Autocar writer
News
3 mins read
22 June 2020

Ford has expanded the Focus range in Europe for 2020, ushering in a new Zetec trim option, enhanced infotainment and mild-hybrid technology that’s said to improve efficiency by up to 17%.

The existing 1.5-litre Ecoboost petrol engine is being phased out to make way for a hybridised version of the Focus’s 1.0-litre Ecoboost unit that, paired exclusively with a six-speed manual gearbox, raises power 5bhp to 153bhp and emits 116g/km of CO2 on the WLTP cycle. It’s available on Titanium trim upwards from £23,610.

A 123bhp version, priced from £24,260, is also available. Both units are capable of 51.4mpg, a noticeable increase on the old engine’s 48.7mpg.

The Ecoboost Hybrid engine uses a variation of the existing 1.0-litre engine but swaps that unit’s alternator for a belt-driven integrated starter/generator, which recovers energy when braking and coasting to charge a 48V lithium ion battery.

Stored power is then used to provide extra torque while driving, as well as to run the car’s ancillary systems. The system automatically determines when to store and when to send its power reserves to a low-output electric motor, which supplements the torque of the petrol engine, boosting output by up to 50% at low revs. 

The battery pack is located under the front seats, which, according to Ford, means cargo and passenger space is unchanged over the existing car's. 

The engine itself has been modified for optimal efficiency and uses a lower compression ratio and a larger turbocharger, with the electric motor’s torque used to mitigate the effects of turbo lag.

Ford has also upgraded the car’s stop/start system to minimise fuel wastage. The engine will now restart in just 350 milliseconds after a stop and a new stop-in-gear function deactivates the engine when coasting to a stop with the clutch depressed.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

Read our review

Car review
Ford Focus ST-line X 2019 road test review - hero front

Focus retains its position as the best-in-class to drive – spec dependent – while adding extra space, functionality and connectivity

Back to top

The Focus is the fourth model in Ford’s passenger car portfolio, after the Kuga, Puma and Fiesta, to adopt mild-hybrid technology, as the company maintains a commitment to electrifying all its European cars by the end of 2021. Expect both variants to arrive in dealerships in July. 

The non-hybrid 1.0-litre engine remains available and can be paired to either the manual gearbox for 50.4mpg or an optional eight-speed automatic for 44.1mpg. The 1.5-litre and 2.0-litre Ecoblue diesel engines remain on sale, too. 

The Zetec nameplate, not yet seen on this generation of Focus, returns as the entry point into the range. Available from £22,210, it’s equipped as standard with 16in alloy wheels, electric wing mirrors with in-built puddle lamps, automatic headlights, leather-trimmed steering wheel and gearstick, an 8.0in touchscreen and a suite of driver aids, including pre-collision assist, autonomous emergency braking and lane-keep assist. 

The Zetec is not available with the new hybrid motor but can be specified with a choice of the conventionally fuelled 1.0-litre Ecoboost engine or the 1.5-litre Ecoblue diesel. 

As part of this round of updates, the Focus gains a new 12.3in digital instrument cluster that can be used in the mild-hybrid car to show energy usage and flow rates. 

Later this year, all Focus models will gain the firm’s FordPass Connect system, which warns of obstacles and hazards on the road ahead using information collected from local authorities, emergency services and other road users. 

Rounding off the model line revisions, the standard kit list for existing ST-Line and Active trim packages has been bolstered with the addition of an auto-dimming rear-view mirror, rain-sensing wipers and keyless entry. 

Read more

Ford Focus: the road test

Ford Focus ST: new automatic variant on sale from £34,710​

Nearly-new buying guide: Ford Focus​

Join the debate

Comments
15

22 June 2020

I'm pretty sure I've read right but other than the fire breathing 2.3 litre st the biggest petrol engine Focus will be a 1.0 3 pot that'll only reach peak power when the battery is fully charged. Hope sales flop big time, oh and putting batteries under front seats does impact on passenger space, where else will their feet go.

22 June 2020

Such negativity WHY I  ask  ? this is the way forward What would your way  be of doing it then .  And saying hope it fails  , is well cant think of printable words . 

22 June 2020
Antony Riley wrote:

Such negativity WHY I  ask  ? this is the way forward What would your way  be of doing it then .  And saying hope it fails  , is well cant think of printable words . 

You'll see far worse on this site. Struggle to understand your second sentence but in larger cars I'm not the biggest fan of one litre three pots, battery, brief up starter motor and software that can save upto ten percent of fuel costs yet can cost over a thousand pounds extra to buy.

I'm not being negative I'm just posting an opinion.

22 June 2020
Antony Riley wrote:

Such negativity WHY I  ask  ? this is the way forward What would your way  be of doing it then .  And saying hope it fails  , is well cant think of printable words . 

I ve got an idea where he can shove those batteries ! :)

23 June 2020

Really, really good looking family car.  Ford has done an otustanding job making a hatchback look classy and interesting.

22 June 2020

 153bhp v 123bhp?, difference £320.00? , why have a lower powered one where a relatively small increase, you can have 30bhp more?!, I can never get the rational behind this, especially when the article says they have a similar mpg figure(51mpg).

22 June 2020
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 153bhp v 123bhp?, difference £320.00? , why have a lower powered one where a relatively small increase, you can have 30bhp more?!, I can never get the rational behind this, especially when the article says they have a similar mpg figure(51mpg).

It may be they're different specs, the 153 is only available in ST-Line.  

22 June 2020

According to the article, only 1 mpg difference over the non-hybrid version, 51.4mpg vs 50.4mpg.

A lot of complexity and changes for so little....

22 June 2020
Bainthrewo wrote:

According to the article, only 1 mpg difference over the non-hybrid version, 51.4mpg vs 50.4mpg.

A lot of complexity and changes for so little....

So true, although you do get a bit more power, and weight.  Still rather have a 1 series for the same money as the one litre 150hp Ford as the initial outlay is the same.

jer

22 June 2020

For a couple of mpg that real world use could reverse. I suppose its lighter and its notably clever but scratching my head if the pros is longer than the cons. I suppose car companies have to meet targets somehow.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week