The new Honda Jazz will go on sale in the UK this September, with prices starting from £13,495

The 2015 Honda Jazz will go on sale in the UK this September, with prices starting from £13,495. The supermini is already on sale in the US and other markets, where it is badged as the Honda Fit.

The new Jazz is 95mm longer than the outgoing car and has a 30mm longer wheelbase, giving it a roomier cabin, and the boot is bigger as well. The ‘Magic Seats’ seen in other Honda models are fitted and can be folded forwards to increase storage space to 897 litres. Boot capacity is set at 354 litres with the rear seats in place.

Read the 2015 Honda Jazz review

There’s a new in-car infotainment system, Honda Connect, that offers real-time news, traffic and weather updates and internet browsing, as well as a 7.0in touchscreen in the centre of the dashboard. This won’t come as standard, though – a 5.0in LCD display comes with lower trim levels.

New safety features come with the Advanced Driver Assist System package - including Lane Departure Warning and a Traffic Sign Recognition system - which is available as standard on all but the entry-level trims. This new safety technology will be used across Honda’s new product line-up in 2015.

Powering the new Jazz will be a 1.3-litre i-VTEC petrol engine, which can be coupled to either a six-speed manual transmission or a CVT. A new 1.0-litre option is likely to appear soon after the car's launch.

A hybrid version, using a 1.5-litre engine in conjunction with an electric motor to develop a combined 133bhp, was initially set to be sold in this country but now has been dropped from the UK line-up. Honda officials said the decision was down to the high cost of importing the car to this country.

The new Jazz will be available in three trim levels, with entry-level S versions getting air conditioning, cruise control and automatic lights. Further up the range, SE verions receive front and rear parking sensors, electric door mirrors and 15-inch alloy wheels, and also get Honda's Driver Assistance Safety Pack. Top-spec EX cars gets keyless entry and start, climate control, an upgraded stereo system and 16-inch alloy wheels.

Built on Honda’s global compact platform, the third-generation Jazz retains the same central fuel tank layout as the outgoing model. Honda says that layout allows it to offer “genuine customer benefits in terms of versatility, interior practicality and storage solutions.”

The car’s suspension has also been revised, delivering what Honda calls “a more refined and comfortable ride for both the driver and passengers”.

Honda’s Leon Brannan said: “The Jazz is a hugely important car for Honda in the UK, and has been a runaway success since its original launch. It has an extremely loyal following".

Prices for the 2015 Honda Jazz start at £13,495 for the 1.3-litre i-VTEC S model with a manual transmission, and rise to £16,815 for the top-spec EX version with a CVT.

Read the full road test on the Honda Jazz here

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Our Verdict

Honda Jazz

The Honda Jazz is a super-practical supermini that’s a doddle to drive and own, but lacking in excitement

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Comments
23

16 September 2014
They've given at a Civic-style face. Have they learned nothing?

17 September 2014
Dark Isle wrote:

They've given at a Civic-style face. Have they learned nothing?

It's not easy to make a small car ugly. So you have to give Honda some credit.

A34

25 February 2015
Looks like a nice update to the Jazz-egg-shape to me. Nice if higher-priced (but higher-residuals) alternative to a Fiesta / B-Max. Or would you prefer a Yaris or i20...

17 September 2014
Such dire styling.
I've lost a lot of respect for Honda. They have totally lost their way.
First they decide to not bother being an engineering led company. Look at their dire emissions standards (their civic 1.8 petrol with 140bhp emits more co2 than a golf gti with 227bhp), and switch from independent to solid axle rear suspension for the jazz and civic.

Then they decide to make all their cars looked terrible and confused.

There used to be a time in the 90's when they led the way. CRX, NSX, even the bog standard Civic stood out amongst their peers. VTEC and Double wishbone suspension all round when most competitors use 8v engines, solid rear axles etc. Now in my view, they are even behind Ford! Almost sinking to meet Vauxhall.

22 July 2015
winniethewoo wrote:

First they decide to not bother being an engineering led company. Look at their dire emissions standards (their civic 1.8 petrol with 140bhp emits more co2 than a golf gti with 227bhp)

No it doesn't. Not if you look at the real world figures rather than the ever increasingly irrelevant European driving cycle numbers. Their 1.8 petrol isn't the most efficient engine around but at circa 40-42mpg it's a lot more efficient than a Golf GTI in the low thirties.

The new 1.6L diesel in the Civic, on the other hand, is one of the most efficient engines around and not even the 1.6 Golf can match it, let alone the 2.0 that's closer in power.

17 September 2014
I actually like the futuristic Civic front, its the Civic rear that offended and it seems better integrated here on the Jazz. I have always like the Jazz (favorite courtesy car during a service) the Tardis phenomena of how spacious it feels inside but when you get out and thats all there is to it outside is amusing. Also the engines, they really are true VTEC's and its funny that give enough revs and a surprising amount of 'go' suddenly comes on tap yet 99% of the aged drivers will never know this as they were bought up never to take their Austins over 3000 rpm.

17 September 2014
Please tell me they've removed the speed limiter from the Jazz that stops any progress above 24mph regardless of road speed limits?
All of the Jazz's (correct pluralization??) around here seem to be afflicted with such a limiter, I've even seen one holding up a tractor!

17 September 2014
Orangewheels wrote:

All of the Jazz's (correct pluralization??)

What about Jai ?

24 July 2015
scotty5 wrote:
Orangewheels wrote:

All of the Jazz's (correct pluralization??)

What about Jai ?

It wouldn't be "Jazz's" as the apostrophe in this usage indicates the (singular) possessive, as in "My new Jazz's engine is a bit rubbish." The plural of "buzz" (a noun meaning a particular noise) is "buzzes", as in " There are a number of buzzes coming from behind the dashboard of my new Jazz." So, I think the plural of "Jazz" (a noun meaning a once very good car that's now a bit "meh"!) Should be "Jazzes" Q.E.D.

17 September 2014
Because I imagine that it will be built here - and presumably that's the reason for the delay in launching, given that this model has been on sale in other markets for some time. With the Honda Swindon plant currently running on tickover, the new Jazz MUST be a success in Europe.
Whatever else one thinks about the Jazz, I'm surprised that it's forward fuel tank location hasn't been copied. It really does liberate a lot of useful space in the rear, though I guess this is achieved in tandem with the simple rear axle design.

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