Government responds to claims it will cut the national speed limit to 50mph
5 October 2009

The government has confirmed it has no plans to reduce the national speed limit to 50mph.

It had been claimed that the government was planning a blanket reduction of the national speed limit on single track roads from 60mph to 50mph, but it has denied that this will be the case.

Instead it plans to look at the speed limit on individual roads on a case by case basis.

More than 45,000 signatures have been obtained on a petition called ‘No NSL reduction’ set up on the Number 10 website.

It said: “Following the announcement that the government is planning to reduce the national speed limit to 50 miles per hour, we the undersigned oppose this, since it will make no difference to road deaths and the cut in carbon emissions is so insignificantly small it’s laughable.”

In a statement responding to the petition, the government said “it is not proposing to reduce the national speed limit”.

It continued: “On 21 April the government published a consultation on the new road safety strategy: A Safer Way: Consultation on Making Britain’s roads the Safest in the World, which closed on 14 July. It sought views on the vision, targets and measures for improving road safety in Great Britain in the period from 2010.

“Regarding single carriageway roads where the national speed limit applies, the government propose to revise our existing guidance to highway authorities, recommending that lower limits are adopted where risks are relatively high and there is evidence that a lower limit would reduce casualties.

“The government believes that this targeted approach is the best way to ensure that speed limits are set at the appropriate level for each road.

“The government will announce the results of the consultation at the end of the year.”

Twitter - follow autocar.co.uk

Join the debate

Comments
12

5 October 2009

[quote Autocar]The government has confirmed it has no plans to reduce the national speed limit to 50mph.[/quote]

That's one bit of good news!

When they said they were going to improve the A77 in Scotland to reduce the number of accidents all we got was speed cameras and in one particular stretch a lower speed limit.

In fact in that area where they reduced the speeding I emailed the MP and he agreed with me that the crossing points on the dual carriage way that is the cause of the accidents and should be removed. Unfortunatley the body responsible, Transport Scotland, refused to make these alterations. It's been showen time and time again that crossings on a busy dual carriage ways are dangerous and closing those gaps solves the problems.

5 October 2009

And was has been said countless times before it's not speed that kills , it's the human interface between man and car that cause accidents.We've all seen examples of bad driving like driving too close at high speeds(above 60mph),not indicating,roundabouts, the list is probably endless, driver education isn't tough enough, penalties aren't(money wise)severe enough, appropriate speed traps(not on motorway bridges or hidden in bushes,to name two ways)but genuine blackspots, not put there by anti car lobbiest's.No, the best deterent was always a bobby wearing a reflective jacket and his trusty hand held speed gun, if you didn't see him you were caught!,plus i think if they want to stop speeding then they should be able to be seen from 300yrds at least because then you'd slow down in plenty of time, it would work as does a sign telling you your speed,this certainly works for me.

Peter Cavellini.

5 October 2009

[quote Symanski]Transport Scotland[/quote]

great idea, but where? who'd want the buggers?

5 October 2009

45000 people petitioned, eh?

How many motorists does the UK have again?

The majority make me feel so apathetic.

Where has all Japanese design went to?

5 October 2009

[quote Autocar]Instead it plans to look at the speed limit on individual roads on a case by case basis.
[/quote]

So really yes they will make just half of them 50mph instead of all of them! Wouldn't surprise me in the least!

5 October 2009

I don't understand why they would reduce the speed limit. I may sound stupid but i think they should increase the speed limit because of the massive leap in car safety over the years and I know for a fact most of Britains motorists would not like the speed reduced

5 October 2009

They also shelved national road-pricing plans after a much bigger e-petition, but they keep wheeling it out so we know it's only on the back burner.

Another reason to vote them out next year.

5 October 2009

No blanket ban, but they will just reduce each stretch of road one by one, well they seem to be in my neck of the woods.

5 October 2009

They should increase it, not cut it... cars are much better at stopping and steering these days...

5 October 2009

[quote Dr.Car]I don't understand why they would reduce the speed limit. I may sound stupid but i think they should increase the speed limit because of the massive leap in car safety over the years and I know for a fact most of Britains motorists would not like the speed reduced
[/quote]

The Government wants to reduce the number of accidents, and in particular, the number of casualties on our roads. A laudable aim. However, rather than pay to make roads safer, which is expensive, they can make some reductions in casualties by passing the buck onto motorists by making us drive more slowly. Lower speeds reduce the severity of accidents quite a lot, although don't reduce the number of accidents very much.

One example of the Government acting sensibly was the introduction of high-grip tarmac at junctions and crossings. There is so much more they could do. Car manufacturers have made massive improvements to vehicles, after all.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Citroën C3 Aircross
    First Drive
    17 October 2017
    The Citroen C3 Aircross has got funky looks and a charming interior, but it's another small SUV, and another dynamic miss. Numb steering is just one thing keeping it from class best
  • Skoda-Karoq 2.0 TDI 4x4
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Diesel version of Skoda’s junior SUV is unobtrusive and undemanding, but we’d still go for the silkier petrol version of the Karoq
  • Audi Q7 e-tron
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Expensive and flawed but this understated diesel-electric Audi Q7 has a lot to offer
  • Citroën C3
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Is the third gen Citroën C3 ‘fresh and different’ enough to take on its supermini rivals? We spend six months with one to find out
  • BMW X3
    First Drive
    15 October 2017
    A satisfying rework of the X3 that usefully improves its handling, cabin finish, space and connectivity to make this BMW a class front-runner again