Government to provide electric cars across the UK
27 October 2008

Transport Secretary Geoff Hoon has announced plans for a £10 million project intended to encourage the development of electric cars in the UK.

Car manufacturers are invited to bid for funding to run electric car and ‘ultra-low carbon vehicle’ demonstration projects in UK cities. Around 100 electric cars will be provided to various towns and cities.

Hoon also said that up to £20 million has already made available to encourage UK research into improving the viability of electric cars, with the Government hoping that up to 10,000 new British jobs will be created through the development of alternative technologies.

Despite the announcement, Britain is still lagging behind in the development of an electric vehicle infrastructure, with Israel and Denmark already pressing ahead with bigger pilot schemes and the creation of nation-wide recharging points.

Last week the British Government acknowledged that widespread use of electric cars in the UK will require dramatic upgrades to the national electricity generation and distribution system.

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Comments
7

27 October 2008

[quote Autocar]Around 100 electric cars will be provided to various towns and cities.
[/quote]

So in essence that's £100k a car. So, given a current state of the art 150 mile range, 25kWh charge at 15p/kWh at ~50% efficiency, that's about 20p per mile electricity cost compared to 40mpg at £5/gal, 12.5p per mile petrol/diesel cost plus an extra £80k or so purchase cost. So that's a negative pay-back period of about one million miles. Excellent. People like this should be running the country. They do? Excellent. Out of this 'downturn' in a trice!

27 October 2008

Sorry if I'm being thick, but where did the 20p a mile figure come from?
25kWh * 15p/kWh = 375p. 375p/150 miles = 2.5p per mile.

27 October 2008

[quote phenergn]

Sorry if I'm being thick, but where did the 20p a mile figure come from?
25kWh * 15p/kWh = 375p. 375p/150 miles = 2.5p per mile.

[/quote]

No, you're not being thick, I am, sorry. I divided range by cost of recharging electricity rather than vice versa. Teach me not to use a calculator for simple arithmetic.

I made that 5p a mile electricity costs rather than straight 2.5p per mile as was making some factor for transformer losses when recharging. 50% loss may be too high, not sure.

Anyway, rest of what I wrote rubbish accordingly. Payback mileage for extra £80k outlay at a saving of 2.5p per mile electricity cost against 12.5p fuel cost would be 800,000 miles or over 1 million miles at 5p per mile electricity cost.

27 October 2008

[quote Autocar]Despite the announcement, Britain is still lagging behind in the development of an electric vehicle infrastructure, with Israel and Denmark already pressing ahead with bigger pilot schemes and the creation of nation-wide recharging points.[/quote]

Don't be so harsh on yourself.

I don't know what the current status in Denmark is, but in Israel there's nothing to talk about, other than empty statements by Mr. Aggasi (Better Place) and the resigning prime minister, Mr. Olmert.

In real life, there are no, as in not even one, electrical charging points. 0.

Which is just fine, as in Israel there are no, again - 0, electric cars.

Oh, sorry - there is one. A prototype based on a Megane sedan built by a small shop for Agassi's lobbying. This car is not even permitted to move on public roads. And it's obviously NOT a development of Renault, or has anything whatsoever to do with Renault's electric car.

So, what do we have so far, besides hot air? A 78% tax on new cars, and one of the western countries oldest car fleet (because new cars cost almost twice compared to the US and about 30%-50% more than Europe, including Britain).

So in short, again - don't be so harsh on yourself - things could be much, much worse...

Roy.

27 October 2008

£10m to save the planet and £37bn to prop up our badly run banks. Ugh.

28 October 2008

I'm sorry, it doesn't even save the planet. An electric car uses 20-30% more energy fed into the power stations than a decent diesel car of the same size uses. Also can someone please proiivde me with a heating system for battery-electric cars (hybtrids are OK) that doesn't drain the batteries?

The running costs today to *UK PLC* are greater for the electric car. The loss in fuel taxation (diesel is taxed, electricity is untaxed or almost untaxed) would have to be made up somewhere else.

28 October 2008

I want to know one simple fact.

Taking out all the infrastructure issues and costs on the environment, what are the CO2 figures per mile of an electric car in comparison to a hybrid car such as a Chevrolet Volt?

All the environmentalists and politicians don't seem to be able to come up with a figure, but I have a gut feeling that the figures would not be favourable for the electric car.

Add in the extra "costs" of setting up an electrical charging infrastructure, I would imagine that in real terms we are going to be causing more pollution and problems than if we left well alone and continued developing the vehicles we have now.

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

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