'Overheating glue' to blame, says firm - but it insists the problem has been solved
1 September 2010

Ferrari North Europe has officially explained the fault that has caused five of the very earliest examples of its 458 supercar to catch fire.

"When the car is driven to high exhaust temperatures, in hot ambient temperatures, the adhesive used in the wheelarch assemblies can overheat and allow the rear wheel housing heat shields to move around. In extreme cases, the glue can begin to smoke and even catch fire," a Ferrari spokesperson told Autocar.

"It would only be a problem on cars driven very hard, and has only affected a handful of the 1248 458 Italias we've delivered so far – none in the UK,” our source confirmed.

Ferrari claims that the problem has been made to look more serious than it should because of unfortunate timing and innaccurate reporting. A new 458 was written off because of a warehouse fire recently, and others have been crashed, the firm says, causing some areas of the media to suggest the car is 'jinxed'.

Ferrari will recall all of the 458s delivered so far to fit new wheelarch liners, which will be attached more securely. It will also be replacing any cars that have been damaged as a result of the problem. All new 458s built now that Ferrari’s Maranello plant has re-opened after the summer shutdown will be rectified before they leave the factory.See all the latest Ferrari reviews, news and video

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Comments
55

1 September 2010

And so, egg and face did come to occupy exactly the same point in the space time continuum.

1 September 2010

A Ferrari spokesman said,

"Ouch! Arrgh! Fuoco! Sto bruciando!!!" *

(* Fuoco, sto Bruciano - Fire ! I'm burning.)

1 September 2010

[quote Autocar]"When the car is driven to high exhaust temperatures, in hot ambient temperatures, the adhesive used in the wheelarch assemblies can overheat and allow the rear wheel housing heat shields to move around. In extreme cases, the glue can begin to smoke and even catch fire," a Ferrari spokesperson told Autocar.
[/quote]

Classic. So let me get this straight, the car cannot be driven reasonably hard (and let's be honest you don't really have to drive like a maniac before the exhaust temperatures get quite high) and you cannot drive it when the sun shines.

I think all the people in California, Dubai or anywhere the sun gets slightly warm, better ask for their deposits back

1 September 2010

Appaz the burnt-out cars will be replaced – as long as owners can prove that the fire was as a result of the glue problem. Sifting through a pile of ash to prove that particular point could be quite a task. The short-sighted meanspiritedness of car manufacturers never ceases to amaze me. Especially when it's a prestige marque behaving like a fly-by-night operation.

1 September 2010

[quote averageman]

Classic. So let me get this straight, the car cannot be driven reasonably hard (and let's be honest you don't really have to drive like a maniac before the exhaust temperatures get quite high) and you cannot drive it when the sun shines.

I think all the people in California, Dubai or anywhere the sun gets slightly warm, better ask for their deposits back

[/quote]

That isn't what the article said. I think it's clear that this is a design flaw that didn't come up under testing and occurs under a rare confluence of events. I think the way Ferrari are handling it, including offering the affected owners new vehicles is commendable. They admitted and detailed the fault and are taking every reasonable measure to rectify it. It also states that this will be fixed on any new cars so no, there is no point for these people in asking for their deposits back.

1 September 2010

Opps maybe should of used Pritt stick on the production line!! I like the Ferrari reply usual play it down, what can be more serious than a car that goes up in smoke!!! They must of known the flashpoint of the glue and the temperature range the car/parts may be subjected to surely??????

1 September 2010

So that's why Ferraris are red... the flames ooooohhhh!!!

1 September 2010

Toyota were halued before congress for less :-)

I also like the PR speak on the beeb with Ferrari execs referring to the faults as 'potential thermal incidents'

1 September 2010

The UK drivers need do nothing, just keep driving your cars the same way you did so far!

1 September 2010

As a percentage of product failure, isn't the 458 a bigger liability than anything Toyota makes? Or any other manufacturer come to that...?

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