Data shows children in deprived areas four times more likely to be killed
26 October 2009

Children are four times more likely to be killed or injured by a car if they live in a deprived area, according to a Public Accounts Committee Report from the House of Commons.

The report states that in areas with lower incomes, higher unemployment and health deprivation, children under 17 are more likely to be unsupervised on or around roads after school.

As a result, the committee has called for urgent action, recommending reduced speed limits in deprived areas and asking for changes to when and how the clocks are moved forward.

Its evidence showed that collision survival rates for pedestrians and cyclists dramatically increases when the vehicle is travelling at less than 20mph.

It also recommended switching to ‘Single Double Summer Time’ or ‘SDST’, which would give vulnerable road users, such as children returning from school, an extra hour of daylight.

George Chapman

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50

26 October 2009

Oh another case of treating the symptom, not the cause. What about educating the children in these areas?

If I were a slightly less politically correct person, one may suggest it is just natures way of deciding survival of the fittest!

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

26 October 2009

Natural Selection:

I'm not PC :-)

I also won't have to deal with any replies becasue as previously stated, the 'email when replied to' function doesn't work!

26 October 2009

20mph speed limit in housing estates is not unreasonable.

26 October 2009

...and they needed a report to tell them this!

26 October 2009

[quote Autocar]Children are four times more likely to be killed or injured by a car if they live in a deprived area, [/quote]

Does this mean killed or injured by a car being driven by its owner , with full licence , tax , insurance etc , or by a car being driven by a joyrider ?

26 October 2009

[quote TegTypeR]Oh another case of treating the symptom, not the cause. What about educating the children in these areas?[/quote]

Agree 100% I think the local councils should give lessons on road safety in school as part of a nationwide process to improve young peoples awarness of road safety.

Making them also take an exam will help them prepare for when they take there theory tests and driving tests in the future. Like my dad said start early and finish early :)

26 October 2009

[quote moe360]Agree 100% I think the local councils should give lessons on road safety in school as part of a nationwide process to improve young peoples awarness of road safety.[/quote]

Education of kids on road safety is primarily the responsibility of their parents. Lets not add another taxpayer-funded activity to local government. School is for academic education, not for bringing kids up.

27 October 2009

[quote Scoobman] School is for academic education, not for bringing kids up[/quote]

Thats a very middle class response. Schools give an all round education- being aware of your local environment should be part of geography- thats a fairly common sense approach, especially if it stops the little blighters getting squished under lorries and the like

27 October 2009

[quote Scoobman]School is for academic education, not for bringing kids up.[/quote]

Did you go to school? The main function of school on a persons life is for the child to be with, talk to and play with other children, and to grow up doing so. It forms who they are, how they react to the world and how they manage more or less what the rest of life throws at them until they die. Learning the academic stuff is merely a bonus. School is about social interaction, in a idealistically safe environment.

27 October 2009

[quote beachland2]Learning the academic stuff is merely a bonus.[/quote]

I remember in primary level education having something known as the Tufty club, which was about road safety, and occupied a small half hour slot, one day a week. It was at an entirely appropriate stage in development, but it was also reinforced by my parents while I was out with them.

I disagree though that learning the academic stuff is simply a bonus, this is patently wrong. In a secondary level enviroment, it everything else that occurs is a bonus. Pupils interact during class work and breaktimes naturally - social situations occur and the pupils learn how best to deal with them. The framework of the school allows for this, but the framework is one of academic teaching. Imagine the reverse - a framework of social interactions and academic work left to hopefully happen, maybe 1 or 2 classes a week to help promote it. It would not work.

A school is not simply social or academic, but it definitely does and should lean heavily to academic work as its frame to hang anything else from.

Back to kids getting run over, thinking about the how and why...

I had 2 possible thoughts - education and then attitude.

Education - some will not know how the road system works, and education would help them read the dangers better, and find safer solutions to pedestrian problems.

Attitude - much more difficult to solve. Some kids get excited to be going somewhere, and fail to look properly - difficult to 'solve'. Others are confrontational. There are numerous other attitudes and they aren't going to ever be solved by straightforward road safety education.

As for why it is the most deprived children at risk, well, i'd say there are going to be many contributing factors, and a bit of education, while not addressing all the factors, might directly or indirectly help.

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