Durham and London reassess the charges
17 December 2008

The cause of Congestion Charging in the UK has taken another double blow.

Durham’s city council has scrapped plans to extend road tolls and the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, said he would consider suspending the capital’s Congestion Charge to help the London economy during the recession.

The moves come in the wake of a resounding rejection by local voters of a congestion charge scheme due to cover much of Greater Manchester.

Durham already has already implemented a charge to enter the centre of the city, where access is restricted by the Medieval street layout.

However, after a comprehensive study into extending road tolling, the local council has dropped the idea.

The leader of council, Simon Henig, said that Durham wanted to "manage the amount of traffic entering and passing through the city" but didn’t want to put people off from visiting.

In the British capital, Johnson told the Mayor’s Question Time he would "brood" on the idea that the whole Congestion Charge scheme should be suspended in light of the economic situation.

"There is a problem with congestion in this city… before we did anything I would have to be assured that congestion would not be affected."

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Comments
6

18 December 2008

One could laugh. The first whiff of grapeshot and the cowards turn tale.

We were told climate change was world problem no.1 confronting humanity on a par with a global war for threat level. So what happened? The recession happened. Old fashioned pounds, shillings and pence kicked in. B.Johnson must know from his bean counters that revenue for the GLA and London boroughs is collapsing. Their main income apart from govt. grant is property taxes. With the 'downturn'(BBC copyrighted - don't mention the 'depression') council tax payments will be massively in arrears with tens of millions of pounds of write-offs. Business rate revenue will be falling massively too through collapsed businesses and again non-payment. Johnson is desperate to encourage economic activity in central London and will ditch the C-charge as a means to encourage 'foot-fall' of punters shopping there.

This just shows how desperate things are when a flagship road use taxing scheme gets ditched unceremoniously. The bureaucrats are petrified about the true state of the books and collapse of revenues of all kinds, but especially property taxes, their core funding. Serves the buggers right, they thought the money was endless with credit creation. Through C-charges, parking charges, CO2 charges they've killed their golden goose. Perhaps they could cut their pensions, wages and expenses now too.

America as ever shows the way. The most Green obsessed part of US is California with Arnie. This idiot pushed for all sorts of Green nonsense. However, due to the collapse in house prices and property taxes, which there are directly related to property value, California is monumentally bankrupt. There too there's now sweet fa talk of saving the planet with Green nonsense. The talk is of saving jobs and cutting costs.

This recession come slump will have one positive result, it will sweep away all the BS about saving the planet and taxing people out of their tin boxes. The talk will be only of holding onto whatever revenue is possible not devising ever new money-grabbing schemes. That newt fancier, Livingstone and his cabal, have a lot to answer for. The only people who will have benefitted from this whole C-charge disaster will be Capita. As usual a massive transfer of public wealth to a small private body with an inside track on govt. officials. That used to be called corruption, T Dan Smith style.

This will spread. The EU bureaucrats yesterday voting for massive taxes on CO2 emission from cars in 2012 will never see their plans come to fruition, thank god. The idea that core employers in Europe should be penalised billions of euros which will then have to passed onto the end customer or absorbed by job cuts to effectively pay for 700 odd parasites to sit around devising new laws and taxes at the little man's expense, plus all the bureaucratic machinery of the Commission on top is incendiary stuff in times of econnomic collapse, with up to 200,000 job losses alone predicted for the German auto industry. This is the bureaucrats, taxers and general parasites high water mark. If they succeed with making up revenue shortfalls with new taxes then frankly the people deserve not to survive as they are merely cattle without spirit. If as I suspect there are enough left to see the madness and wickedness of an elite voting themselves assured finance streams to pay for their ever expanding wage packets, perks and pensions off the back of a declining production base and wage levels then like London and the C-charge the Europe CO2 tax monster will be slain too by popular revolt. For goodness sake let the market decide. If a carmaker wishes to offer market leading low emission levels and fuel consumption and invests in the technology accordingly and there is a market for such a product he will be rewarded with sales success, if not, he won't. Why have we lost sight of such a powerful and effective mechanism and handed powers over to control freaks whose only true desire is to ensure their incomes and posterity? It must stop. It will stop. The 'downturn' will make it so.

18 December 2008

Congestion WILL go up if it was romoved for the first couple of weeks as it would be a novalty. But then everyone will get sick of the congestion and go back to using public transport. I do think its a good idea, and i hope boris does the right thing.

18 December 2008

If Boris does this, then it will be more to do with winning votes than saving the economy.

People cant afford to drive into town to go shopping anyway, as there is nowhere to park and the car parks are ridiculously expensive. He should have concentrated on the trams and bridges which had been planned, instead of scrapping them.

People forget that all this will have to be paid for. This means paying a large fine to the company that runs the charge as they have a long term contract - another waste of money. Also, where will cuts be made to make up for the revenue which TFL has been getting from the C-Charge over the last few years?

18 December 2008

Horseandcart - this is the best written honest Blog I have seen for a long time.

We seem to compound deep routed bad decisions with more bad decisions. However is it really the politicians fault - would we really suport a polititian who is brave enough to take us through the pain barrier? We really need to revolutionise our system so that we can get the best people to run our country - and support them.

Like the next government, Boris has little room for manoever. However the Conjestion Charge should never have been introduced - and we should correct this ill even if it means going through a pain barrier.

A Big Thank You to the people of Macester. The dispicable way in which they were threatened to withold funding makes their resounding No vote truly brave. It sends a clear signal to those who are supposed to represent the people that they should be listened to.

18 December 2008

'Vectra32' thank-you.

Our biggest enemy in seeing through all these scams and cons is our mass media. However, as times become truly desperate for many, the media have to up their game with the spin and outright propaganda for these taxing schemes. It is then that they show their true colours. When money was plentiful for most, most chose not to look too closely at what was being told to them. This is our chance to fight back against the lies, the control-freakery, the downright corruption. The more desperate the economic situation gets in the real world the more desperate and shrill the message of the tyrants and their media lackeys will become. Then they can be exposed for what they are: 'eveyone's equal but some are more equal than others'.

18 December 2008

[quote Quattro369]

If Boris does this, then it will be more to do with winning votes than saving the economy.

People cant afford to drive into town to go shopping anyway, as there is nowhere to park and the car parks are ridiculously expensive. He should have concentrated on the trams and bridges which had been planned, instead of scrapping them.

People forget that all this will have to be paid for. This means paying a large fine to the company that runs the charge as they have a long term contract - another waste of money. Also, where will cuts be made to make up for the revenue which TFL has been getting from the C-Charge over the last few years?

[/quote]

Since it's introduction 5 years ago the Congestion Charge has brought in revenues of just over £929 million (65% of which goes to Capita to run the thing!). Here's the crunch - the net cash generated for Tfl over those 5 years is £14 million - yes, only £14 million. In which case I think Tfl will hardly miss such a paltry amount.

Figures taken from the Association of British Drivers' report:

http://www.abd.org.uk/london_congestion_charge_report2007.htm

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