McLaren's exclusive 986bhp P1 GTR costs £1.98 million and will only be offered to existing P1 owners

This is the final production version of the McLaren P1 GTR, the ultimate track-only incarnation of the Woking firm’s hypercar.

The 986bhp P1 GTR was first seen in design concept form at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance last August. Now in its final form, the P1 GTR is on display at the Geneva motor show with its design further optimised for aerodynamic performance and cooling.

Read the McLaren P1 GTR review

The Instant Power Assist System powertrain’s output has been significantly boosted over its application in the road-going P1. The twin-turbo 3.8-litre V8 now produces 789bhp (up from 727bhp in the standard P1) and the electric motor has 197bhp (up from 176bhp). The combined output is 986bhp, up from 903bhp. Weight has also been saved by removing powertrain features designed specifically for road use.

The aerodynamic package on the P1 GTR is even more extensive than on the P1 road car. The most striking element is the large, fixed rear wing, which sits 400mm above the bodywork – 100mm more than the adjustable rear wing on the road car at its highest setting.

This wing works with the aerodynamic flaps ahead of the front wheels, and the whole package produces 10% more downforce (660kg) than the P1 road car at 150mph. The Drag Reduction System of the P1 road car is retained.

Read the full McLaren P1 review

As with the design concept, the P1 GTR production car has an aerodynamic blade running along the lower bodywork, which is said to smooth airflow. A more aggressive front splitter is also used.

Lightweight features on the P1 GTR reduce the car's weight by 50kg to 1140kg, compared with the P1 road car’s 1490kg. They include the use of motorsport-spec polycarbonate for the side windows, carbonfibre panels for the roof and engine bay in place of glass, and twin exhaust pipes made from an Inconel and titanium alloy.

2016 Geneva Motorshow: McLaren hint that next generation P1 hypercar could be fully-electric

The front track of the P1 GTR is 80mm wider than the P1 road car's, and it sits 50mm lower to the ground on a fixed ride height. It runs on 19in centre-locking motorsport alloy wheels with slick Pirelli tyres.

This P1 GTR is finished in the same yellow and green livery as the Harrods-sponsored F1 GTR, chassis #06R, that finished on the podium at Le Mans in 1995.Offered for sale to only the 375 existing P1 road car owners for £1.98 million, the P1 GTR includes entry to the McLaren P1 Driver Programme. 

This is similar to Ferrari’s XX programme and offers a driver profiling session with McLaren that includes a bespoke seat fitting, a design and livery consultation with design chief Frank Stephenson and a go in McLaren’s simulator.

An initial testing session for owners will take place at Silverstone, before a proper track session at the Circuit de Catalunya in Spain. 

Rivals for the hardcore P1 include the LaFerrari FXX K and the recently announced Aston Martin Vulcan.

Watch McLaren's official preview video for the new P1 GTR.

Watch McLaren's official video explaining its P1 GTR Driver Programme:

Why is McLaren making the P1 GTR?

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Comments
11

22 October 2014
Usually most road cars that get optimized for the track end up getting a horrible rear spoiler and to many vents. doesn't really affect me as I know they are made for lap times, But this McLaren P1 GTR, everything seems to be in proportion and looks great. Seems like you get a lot of perks for your £1.98m, although you could get a McLaren P1 and a LaFerrari for that price. Hmmm...

23 October 2014
One of my most enduring motoring images was formed when Top Gear raced a 30 years old McLaren F1 vs a Bugatti Veyron and it took them 10 attempts before the Bugatti finally overtook the McLaren only at top speed.

16 January 2015
fadyady wrote:

One of my most enduring motoring images was formed when Top Gear raced a 30 years old McLaren F1 vs a Bugatti Veyron and it took them 10 attempts before the Bugatti finally overtook the McLaren only at top speed.

I remembered that too. Struck a chord because an often quoted performance stat for the Veyron - Clarkson said it himself on Top Gear - was that the Veyron could let the F1 get to 120MPH and still beat it to 200.ie Veyron 0-200 is quicker than F1 120-200. Yet on the video they looked pretty neck and neck

 

18 February 2015
fadyady wrote:

One of my most enduring motoring images was formed when Top Gear raced a 30 years old McLaren F1 vs a Bugatti Veyron

Funny that... Did you watch an episode from 2022?

16 January 2015
Second only to my family and pets, I love cars. But I loathe these ridiculous track only toys with an equal and opposite passion. They are not even good at the only thing they can do - how knackered would a proper track car have to be to not thrash any of them round a track?

17 January 2015
I really don't understand the negativity towards these track only hyper cars as I however think they are a brilliant idea. You say that they are not even good at the only thing they can do but I don't think you understand what this is. What these cars allow the owners to do is be able to drive them as they were intended to be driven without devaluing them. Think about it. A lot of the road cars will be nothing more than garage queens, something to covert and admire or a future investment as it were. The lower the mileage the better and certainly you aren't going to have been thrashing them around a track are you? Having one of these not only preserves your new work of art but allows you to indulge in your need for speed at the one place where it makes sense to do it, at a track and for that you might as well have the most track biased version you can get rather than the compromise of a road car trying to be something it can't. I bet these will get more proper use in their first year than over half of the road cars will get in their life times. Which is more ridiculous, a car that get's used for it's intended purpose or a car that sit's idle in a garage? The fact that you get completely pampered by the manufacturer and have everything organised for you can only add to the appeal in my opinion

17 January 2015
Completely agree that to buy a car and not use it is idiotic. But to be fair to buyers, you rarely see delivery mileage cars for sale - they do get used, in whatever way their owners choose. But I would be driven insane by the idea of having a car (that is a heart a road car) only being usable on a racing track (where it cannot race). And what happens in five years time, when the manufacturer has moved on? Why do F1 GTRs get converted to road use? Why are 250 GTOs all registered for the road?

17 January 2015
Your forgetting the obvious point that you would have had to already purchased a road going version to qualify for both this and Ferrari's FXX cars so these are only ever going to bought by someone who intends to use them on track only so comparisons with other very limited number race cars which have later been converted because it would likely be the only way to get one on the road just doesn't hold water in this case. Mclarens customer support is also probably second to none so they aren't going to just pretend that you don't exist when the official program ends and I'd argue that if you are in the position to spend nearly 2 million on a track car you will have plenty left in the bank to get the car around the world yourself. My final point is that thousands of people regularly enjoy cars on track without it having to be part of a race series be it either road cars, ex race cars or dedicated track only cars. They just enjoy trying to find out what both they and the cars are capable of in a safe, controlled environment. These are just the ultimate expression of the track only cars and I just don't see anything wrong with them even of a lot of people do

20 February 2015
Instead of buying a P1 and a P1 GTR for three million quid, buy two P1s for two million. Keep one as an investment, use one as a track day car. And save a million.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

16 January 2015
Those lucky 375!

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