Currently reading: UK driving test set for changes in 2017
New manoeuvres will be added to the test to help drivers prepare for 'real-life' scenarios in an attempt to reduce road accidents
Doug Revolta Autocar
News
2 mins read
14 July 2016

The UK driving test is being changed to use different manoeuvres and increase the length of independent driving, in an effort to cut the number of road collisions.

Reversing round a corner and turning in the road will be replaced by 'real-life' manoeuvres such as reversing into and driving out of a parking bay. The amount of independent driving in the test will also double from 10 minutes to 20 minutes, and drivers could be asked to follow directions from a sat-nav.

Candidates will also be asked one of the two ‘show me, tell me’ questions while driving. For example, candidates could be asked to use the heated rear window.

The changes are part of the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) and government push to reduce the number of young people killed on the road. Currently, more than a quarter of deaths of those aged between 15 and 19 are the result of road collisions.

Changes in the test already explored by the DVSA include allowing learner drivers to get experience on motorways, and also introducing a deposit that would be refunded to those who pass the test. The DVSA has not indicated that these changes will be implemented with these latest alterations.

The DVSA is working with the Transport Research Laboratory trialling these new proposals, with more than 4500 learner drivers and 850 driving instructors taking part.

The cost of a driving test in the UK will remain the same.

There is now a consultation period of six weeks that will allow people to share their views of the changes - click here to do so. The deadline is 25 August; the information will be collated by the DVSA and a full report published.

DVSA chief driving examiner, Lesley Young, said: "Candidates will be given more responsibility for making decisions during the test.

"We want them to show they can cope with distractions and assess risk without the intervention of their instructor or examiner."

The executive director of Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety, David Davies, said: "No one gets killed making a three-point turn in a cul-de-sac. New drivers need to be more skilled and experienced in driving at speeds on a variety of roads."

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Comments
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The Apprentice 14 July 2016

I am delighted!!! living down

I am delighted!!! living down a long quiet road that is well know for driving test routes, my access to my home is often impeded by a series of barricades caused by half a dozen instructors and their pupils stuck across the road taking half an hour to do a turn. Its bloody annoying. I know, I know we all had to learn once and all that, but why can't they sod off and go use some else's road from time to time? I pay the same council tax as anyone else.
scotty5 14 July 2016

What's DVSA's excuse not to include it already?

autocar wrote:

Changes in the test already explored by the DVSA include allowing learner drivers to get experience on motorways... The DVSA has not indicated that these changes will be implemented with these latest alterations.

Criminal if they don't.

Able to reverse a car around a corner at less than walking pace and without touching the kerb? Of course you can joint a four lane motorway with other vehicles travelling at 70mph if not more - don't worry about it.

Andrew 61 14 July 2016

Good luck with that..

"New drivers need to be more skilled and experienced in driving at speeds on a variety of roads." With average road speeds falling year on year and with highways incurring speed limit reductions, seemingly on mass, this may be difficult to achieve. Not exceeding 20 mph during a driving lesson will severely restrict development of the necessary driving skills.

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