German sales fall for a fifth consecutive month; Italian sales reach a 14-year low
5 May 2010

German new-car sales fell for the fifth consecutive month in April after the withdrawal of the country's scrappage scheme caused a slump in demand.

April 2010's figures showed a 32 per cent fall in demand compared to April 2009, and a 10.2 per cent decline compared to pre-scrappage figures for April 2008.

Germany's VDIK President, Volker Lange, remained upbeat despite April's figures. He said: "Initial estimates show new orders for our members are on the same level as in April 2008, which I see as the first move toward an automotive springtime in Germany."

Italy's new-car sales fell by nearly 16 per cent to hit a 14-year low in April, the first month since its scrappage scheme ended.

Market leader Fiat suffered a crash of 26 per cent from March and expects the Italian market to shrink by around 30 per cent for the period April to December 2010.

Elsewhere in Europe, Spain's scrappage scheme caused a surge in new-car demand last month, while France's reduced scrappage offering saw a much slower growth in demand of just 1.6 per cent.

The UK's first post-scrappage figures will be announced later this week.

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21

5 May 2010

If the manufacturers acted like they did in the UK scheme, they will need to drop their prices by a couple of grand to get back to pre scrappage prices and get customers buying again.

Where has all Japanese design went to?

5 May 2010

[quote Zeddy]

If the manufacturers acted like they did in the UK scheme, they will need to drop their prices by a couple of grand to get back to pre scrappage prices and get customers buying again.

[/quote]

Mate, would you really buy a new car now? It's private sales that have collapsed - again - in Germany, Italy and so on. Whether a new Golf or Punto costs €2k less really matters not when night after night people see Greece going down the plughole and the mainstream media desperately telling the sheep 'it's alright, honest, green shoots of recovery are everwhere; please keep calm and go back to mindless consuming; that is all'. The more desperate and shrill the tone that 'all is alright' and the recovery to jobs and prosperity underway, the more people smell a rat. Most sentient people have twigged that the whole edifice is about to collapse again, as they, the elites, only propped up it temporarily with transfers of taxpayers money to the bankers and huge debts for the last two years. As usual UK and US are the two rogue states in this matter, with the US sales up one-fifth year-on-year, post cash-for-clunkers, and I would expect UK to go on consuming hard post scrappage. Maybe Americans and Brits are simply more gullible to the media's BS. There's a reckoning acoming.

5 May 2010

[quote nicksheele]Mate, would you really buy a new car now? It's private sales that have collapsed - again - in Germany, Italy and so on. Whether a new Golf or Punto costs €2k less really matters not when night after night people see Greece going down the plughole and the mainstream media desperately telling the sheep 'it's alright, honest, green shoots of recovery are everwhere; please keep calm and go back to mindless consuming; that is all'. The more desperate and shrill the tone that 'all is alright' and the recovery to jobs and prosperity underway, the more people smell a rat. Most sentient people have twigged that the whole edifice is about to collapse again, as they, the elites, only propped up it temporarily with transfers of taxpayers money to the bankers and huge debts for the last two years. As usual UK and US are the two rogue states in this matter, with the US sales up one-fifth year-on-year, post cash-for-clunkers, and I would expect UK to go on consuming hard post scrappage. Maybe Americans and Brits are simply more gullible to the media's BS. There's a reckoning [/quote]

This wouldn't be part of the Henry Kissinger, Dennis Healey, Prince Philip Masonic, Illumanati master-plan where we all end up in FEMA death camps by any chance? I blame the sheeple. :-)

5 May 2010

The more I read David Icke's stuff, the more I wonder who's the mad one.

5 May 2010

[quote nicksheele]Maybe Americans and Brits are simply more gullible to the media's BS. [/quote]

That maybe so but we also have the advantage of not being in the Eurozone. Any effect of Greeces collapse will probably not be seen here for some time.

I have a job and things are going well so if i want a new car I'm not going to be scared out of it by fear of what might happen. By the way I don't have any credit card debt or loans (except the mortgage) so I'm not one of the mindless consumers either, just getting on with my life as best I can within my means. Isn't that what most people do?

5 May 2010

[quote tonym911]The more I read David Icke's stuff, the more I wonder who's the mad one.[/quote]

He's as mad as a box of frogs. The illumanati nonsense is bad enough but once they become shape shifting space aliens it beggars belief that some people buy it.

5 May 2010

Wow

A post scrappage scheme slump in sales.

Who'd have predicted that?

5 May 2010

Consultants

Year 1 - get in and turn everything upside down

Year 2 - claim that you're sitting back to monitor progress

Year 3 - get out quick before everyone realises your ideas don't work

Wonder if that's why Labour have allowed Gordon Brown to stay in post? I wouldn't have wanted to stay in power if I knew what was coming...

5 May 2010

[quote Lee23404]That maybe so but we also have the advantage of not being in the Eurozone. Any effect of Greeces collapse will probably not be seen here for some time[/quote]

- you're right, UK will get, oh, maybe two to three more nanoseconds than Greece before the speculators short UK bonds, the pound, the British economy.

UK is far more indebted than Greece, public and private debt combined. Greece is 2-3% of EU GDP. UK and Spain are the real problems in Europe, whether inside the euro or out, then the US.

Take a look at the price of gold. Investors know the only way out is printy printy money by the elites. It's impossible to repay all the debt. The bankers have destroyed the world. They have nominal, minimum $600 trillion in unregulated, over the counter derivative bets, like credit default swaps, a high proportion of which have gone bad, as a result of the mortgage bubble bursting and the whole amount has been shouldered by taxpayers as sovereign national debt.

What should happen is Greece should default, like Iceland. The money is owed to German and French banks(bankers) mainly for credit default swap debts. The German taxpayer, European taxpayers and Americans through the IMF are being asked to pay $100bn to bail out, again, bankers in Frankfurt, Paris, New York and the City for their failed gambling debts. Next it''l be Portugal, Spain and then UK, post election. Each time the bankers get their gambling debts paid, like the Greece case, the incentive will be to plough on and pull down the next country, that'll then be bailed out, i.e., they get paid for failed bonds plus their initial shorts(they win twice), and so on.

The only way to stop this is for sovereign countries to default, that is, tell the bankers we're not gonna pay your ponzi, pyramid scheme, fraudulent gambling debts. We will do like Iceland, take the hit of having our credit rating trashed but be able to start again, without the multi-generational drag of usurious debt payment, from which the economy will and must eventually collpase under, due to the exponential function.

This summer is crunch time. No more bailing out and kicking the can down the road. Either the bankers get to fully control countries like chattels and their peoples as debt slaves in perpetuity or they're kicked out, jailed, whatever - see Ireland's police chiefs hinting at this last week - and the economy implodes immediately, but for the medium to long term we can start over without the parasitic bankers sucking the life out of all human enterprise. That's what is at stake. The scrappage schemes were one of the last gasps of the old corrupt system, propping it all up, before the crooks could cash in, knowing, like in 2007 - pre Bear Stearns blowup - that the whole thing is about to fall again.

5 May 2010

It really seems to be as NickSheele says ... they say Portugal and Spain are next ... Tannedbaldhead ... you are my voice of reason on this forum on many issues (you also own an mx-5 which is my favourite car) ... can you pls comment on these developments ...

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