Nissan and Ecotricity challenge UK government to provide official signage for EV drivers to help them to find charging stations more easily
22 October 2015

Nissan and green energy company Ecotricity have launched a campaign to persuade the government to create and install road signs to aid electric vehicle drivers in finding charging points.

Lack of infrastructure has long been a concern of electric vehicle suppliers and buyers alike. The campaign aims to better this by adding EV-specific signage to the roads in order to provide the same directions to refuelling facilities as there is for conventionally powered vehicle drivers, as well as alerting non-EV drivers that the infrastructure is in place, should they want to make the change to an electric car.

The campaign aims to catch the attention of the Department for Transport and the Office for Low Emission Vehicles, by rallying the support of other stakeholders in the automotive and sustainability sectors. The network of over 9000 electric vehicle charging points across the country currently has no official signage; the campaign’s aim is to introduce a family of symbols and signs to clearly signpost types of chargers, such as rapid or standard chargers.

Ecotricity boss Dale Vince called time on the lack of official signage, saying: “It’s time to introduce charging point road signs in Britain. They’ll provide necessary direction for the thousands of electric car drivers in Britain, as well as increasing public awareness that the infrastructure is ready.”

Jim Wright, Nissan UK’s managing director said that the push was driven partly by customer feedback. “The feedback we get is that there are many sources of information and some are good and some aren’t,” he said. “The purpose of this is to get a commonality of approach so a customer can find out where a charging point is. It is also raising a customer’s day to day awareness of EVs.”

He said that there had not yet been any response from Government, but expected it would be on their radar. However, he said he expected that funding for installation and upkeep is something that is likely to be left to the private sector.

“Nissan has funded or helped fund hundreds of rapid chargers across the country and across Europe,” he said. “Government expenditure in this is focussed on different things and to drive the uptake of EVs in a different way.”

Jimi Beckwith

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Comments
16

22 October 2015
So, giving them five grand, zero tax and free charging points is not enough. Now they want special signs, too. All so they can showboat their ludicrous fantasies of lowering the planet's temperature etc. And all paid for by higher taxes on the rest of us. It's high time this mad gravy-train stopped; soon they'll be demanding special roads, just for them.

22 October 2015
Lowering the planet temperature??? never crossed my mind! Lowering my tax bill yes, and we do already have special roads just for us. Its called the inside lane and it means we are clear of the soot emitted from German pseudo premium barges that never use it.

22 October 2015
I think I'd tell them politely where to go.

It shouldn't be the governments responsibility. Electric cars should be compulsory fitted with satnav that is constantly updated with charge point locations. If Tesla can do it then why not. They could even be added to tomtoms and the like as points of interest, if they aren't already.

 

 

You're not stuck in traffic - you are traffic!!

22 October 2015
Nobody wants more road signs plaguing our roadside. Ecotricity and Nissan really have it wrong this time!

22 October 2015
If we are truly serious about electric cars, we need to start building a few more power stations and recharging points, not wasting money on signage. Drivers are already bombarded with too much information from too many road signs.

22 October 2015
Oh stop moaning!! I hate the ludicrous amount of road furniture too but a small symbol in the corner of existing signs such as those warning of upcoming services isn't going to kill anyone.

It would be a damn sight more useful than just advising which brand of overpriced gut rotting coffee or "cardiac arrest in a box" burger is available!

22 October 2015
It makes sense to have a standardised sign that means a charging point is located in a certain space/place, but that's all you need. The companies that put these in spend money on signage anyway, so just give them a set of guidelines to work with and that'll do the job fine at no cost to anyone. Anyone with an EV is going to have some form of Sat-Nav or App that they can use to find the things. Quite scared I slightly agree with Norma Smellons on that one... But one question to Norma, why not let EV's go in bus lanes until the numbers pick up. Wouldn't cost a penny to anyone.

22 October 2015
On the motorway I prefer to concentrate on my driving rather than trying to search a POI and set a sat nav. Many services signs already have information such as "LPG" on them how many people use LPG? There is easily room for a modest "2AC/2DC" to be added somewhere to the EXISTING signs for all the moaning minnies.

22 October 2015
Phil R wrote:

wouldn't cost a penny to anyone

...except, of course, for the ordinary motorist who pays whopping taxes (plus CC) only to see half the road-space removed for mostly empty buses, in mostly empty bus lanes. Prezza's Lane on the M4 was the exemplar of this sort of lunacy and is now thankfully gone. No, if EVs are as fabulous as their advocates suggest then it is time they made their own case, sans subsidy.

23 October 2015
Norma Smellons wrote:
Phil R wrote:

wouldn't cost a penny to anyone

...except, of course, for the ordinary motorist who pays whopping taxes (plus CC) only to see half the road-space removed for mostly empty buses, in mostly empty bus lanes. Prezza's Lane on the M4 was the exemplar of this sort of lunacy and is now thankfully gone. No, if EVs are as fabulous as their advocates suggest then it is time they made their own case, sans subsidy.

I never said to build any more bus lanes, just use the existing ones. And the ordinary motorist would benefit as the EV's would use up the empty bus lanes and not congest the normal road space.

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