Five technologies identified as essential for government investment
9 July 2010

The Automotive Council’s technical advisory group has identified five so-called "sticky technologies" in which government should invest.

They include advanced internal combustion engines, lightweight structures, energy storage developments, power management and intelligent transport systems.

Full story: bright future for UK R&D

Why sticky? “They are advanced skills which aren’t very transportable, so clients will keep coming to the UK to achieve the results they need,” says Nissan technology boss Jerry Hardcastle, the leader of the advisory group.

Lotus, Ford, Jaguar Land Rover, Ricardo and others are among Europe’s leaders advanced internal combustion engines, while the UK's F1 and aerospace know-how means it has capabilities in lightweight structures and energy storage developments such as batteries, flywheels, chemical systems, and race-bred KERS.

Intelligent transport systems includes areas such as interactive navigation and intelligent motorway convoy systems. MIRA test track in Leicestershire has just installed a track to test such systems.

Steve Cropley

Join the debate


9 July 2010

All good stuff but I would be very releived if the government focussed on a back to basics campaign too . How about repairing a few potholes with some of the unemployed folk out there might give them a fair wage and would give better roads for all .

9 July 2010


Why not have those in prison doing the job,like they do

in the States.?

If those in prison had to do some hard work perhaps they

would not be so keen to go back in!.

10 July 2010

[quote Old Toad]How about repairing a few potholes[/quote] District and County councils should be made to spend the money allocated for road maintenance to that purpose rather than using it for other things. With a decent road system money would be saved in repairs to cars damaged by potholes and compensation paid to individual motorists. It would be best if councils ceased spending money on putting in road-reducing "traffic management" schemes and concentrated on spending that money on plain old maintenance of unadorned free-flowing roadways. Also get rid of all the distracting and potentially-dangerous signage, they are ugly and spoil both town and country. Its just common sense really.

Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

11 July 2010

[quote ordinary bloke]With a decent road system money would be saved in repairs to cars damaged by potholes and compensation paid to individual motorists. [/quote]

Whilst the pot holes need repairing in more than 25 years of driving I have never damaged a car by driving through a pot hole. Th eonly time I have damaged one is striking a large kerb at speed. Overseas I have driven on dirt roads and rough tracks in normal cars and tryres and suffred no more than the occasional puncture.

My conclusion is most claims for cars damaged by driving through potholes are entirely spurious. Hence a crack down on these claims would leave more money for highways maintenance purposes.

Given that many British inventions have been developed by foreign companies I see little point in backing these new concepts unless funding through to production is available to ensure the investment is recouped by the taxpayer.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • First Drive
    21 March 2018
    The new Vantage has been developed as a Porsche 911 beater, and our first taste on UK roads suggests it can live up to that bold claim
  • Nissan Leaf Tekna
    The is the new Nissan Leaf
    First Drive
    21 March 2018
    The new version of the world's best-selling electric car gains a bigger battery and more power. How does it compare to rivals such as the Volkswagen e-Golf?
  • Range Rover p400e
    First Drive
    20 March 2018
    The original luxury SUV is now available as a plug-in hybrid, promising lower emissions and the capacity for silent electric motoring
  • BMW i3s
    Car review
    20 March 2018
    Revised hatchback sets out its range-extended electric stall in a new, sportier tune
  • BMW X2
    This is the new BMW X2
    First Drive
    20 March 2018
    Doesn’t deliver many typical crossover selling points but looks perky, handles keenly and is well capable of winning over your latent cynic