Following the words of the German deputy economy minister, all 16 German federal states have stated they want to ban petrol and diesel cars by 2030

German federal states have called for a ban on all petrol and diesel cars by the start of the year 2030, leaving only zero-emissions vehicles on the road.

A report by Spiegel Online says that all sixteen federal states have taken a vote confirming they want to ban petrol and diesel cars within 14 years, and that this would help to reach the up to 95% reduction in emissions agreed for 2050. However, it did not specify whether the proposed ban would take them off the roads, or simply halt their sales.

The German magazine also reported that despite a €1.2 billion (around £1.07bn) scheme to boost public interest in electrified vehicles, just 1800 drivers had registered interest. A €4000 (around £3594) grant is offered to those buying an electric car, and €3000 (around £2695) is offered to prospective plug-in hybrid buyers.

Germany aims to have 300,000 electric cars on the road by 2019, and half a million the following year. By 2030, it hopes to have six million electrified vehicles – hybrids and pure EVs – on its roads.

The states’ desire to be fossil fuel-free by 2030 was kickstarted by the deputy economy minister of Germany, Rainer Baake, who called for 100% of all new car registrations to be for emissions-free models by 2030.

Other countries have recently considered banning fossil-fuelled cars; Norway’s four main political parties are debating whether to ban petrol and diesel cars by 2025, as has the Netherlands. Paris has also banned all pre-1997 cars, and a ban on diesel cars in London has gained traction.

Manufacturers have also been turning their backs on petrol and diesel cars; Renault recently predicted the death of diesel models before 2020, especially in its smaller cars, while a group in the UK has called for diesel drivers to pay higher taxes than petrol drivers

Our Verdict

Volkswagen Golf

Just how good is the mighty Volkswagen Golf, Europe's best selling car that's now in its seventh generation?

Join the debate

Comments
4

10 October 2016
Its not just Germany. Its practically every developed EU state. The EU as a whole has a zero carbon goal. You can't achieve that with millions of petrol and diesel engined cars. In the UK its actually legislation now. The country will be breaking its own law if its not zero carbon after 2050.

10 October 2016
Very aggressive propaganda, highly used in recent time, and totally out of proportion. Electric cars and hybrids have marginal sales and that is changing very slowly. They don't even have constant growth but oscillations with sales drops for different periods. Even if Germany reach 6 million electrified vehicles compared to approximately 60 million vehicles that it has, it is just 10% and that is optimistic forecast for 15 years from now, now it is around of 1%. No car brand will even give up diesel engines as long as they are making half of sales, let alone petrol engines. Also carbon footprint for producing electricity for making a electric car run for a mile, is not that impressively lower than for petrol car and same footprint would be reached by constant new emissions regulations as we are used to for regular engines. So totally unrealistic, utopian or financed view is roughly forced here, if not, than oil has depleted a long ago, there is no drinkable water, Antarctica is already history... (not trying to dismiss global warming and green house effects just please make them closer to scientific facts)

13 October 2016
Not to forget, that to date there has not been a serious investigation, that is considering not only the footprint of fuel/electricity, but also the footprint of producing the whole care including the batteries and that one of the destruction of the combustion-powered vehicles, that will be destroyed prior to their actual end of life. Up until then, the comparison and categorization of electricity-powered vehicles as zero-emission may be misleading or even completely wrong - even if there are no exhaust-fumes coming out of it, which makes them rather 'local-zero-emission' vehicles.

13 February 2017
Due to hybridization of vehicles, the importance of fuel vehicles losses its shine. Fuel vehicles are responsible for vehicle emission and environmental pollution, so it is quite better to go for hybrid vehicles. German states are also taking beneficial steps to plan for banning fuel vehicles by 2030, therefore, they start manufacturing smart and hybrid vehicles in a huge number. Which ultimately helpful for the environment system.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week