US company set to disappear completely from European car markets in 2011
5 November 2009

Chrysler will disappear completely from European car markets in 2011, company bosses have confirmed.

In addition, Dodge will have only a niche role outside of its home market, while Jeep will become the company’s sole international brand.

Fiat/Chrysler's five-year plan

The new Chrysler 300C and new Voyager MPV will both be sold under the Lancia badge, according to a report from Automotive News Europe.

Lancia will re-badge the 300C and sell it as a replacement for defunct Lancia Thesis executive car and the Voyager as a replacement for the ageing Phaedra MPV.

Lancia will also sell a version of the next-generation Sebring saloon, effectively stepping in for Lybra, which went off sale in 2006. Lancia will also get a version of Chrysler’s upcoming medium-size crossover.

Fiat will sell re-badged Dodge models, according to the report. Fiat’s big Croma hatch will be replaced by Dodge’s new mid-sized saloon and the Dodge Journey crossover will step in for the ancient Ulysse MPV.

There’s no news on what will happen to Chrysler’s European dealer network in light of the decision to concentrate on Jeep sales.

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Comments
51

5 November 2009

Seems like a sensible plan in light of Chrysler's failure to get anywhere in Europe. Can't really imagine what kind of an animal a Hemi V8 Lancia 300C would be though...

5 November 2009

I'd love to meet the marketing suit who decided that branding ex-Chryslers as the Thesis, Phaedra, Lybra, and Croma was a smart move. This has to be a wind up.

5 November 2009

sorry fellas, all you starry-eyed Marchionne fan boys who swooned over FIAT conquering the world with chic Italian gotta-have products have just been brought down to earth. What the f*ck else did you expect from a marriage between the world's worst car company, Chrysler, and a dyed in the wool corporate legal man, Marchionne. You are not talking passionate car guys here. You're talking dessicated calculating machines, sweating assets, thinking they were onto a good thing, with picking up Chrysler's production and dealer assets for a song, or rather zilch. This will end in tears and will make Rover/BMW and Daimler/Chrysler/Cerberus look like MBA case studies in successful mergers.

5 November 2009

Considering how bad the Chrysler Voyager did in the Euro NCAP tests (you'll lose your legs if your the driver) I'd be quite happy not to have Chrysler in Europe. Quite simply they're not up to the job.

Unfortunately, they want to reband some models as Fiats.

5 November 2009

The headline says "Chrysler killed off in Europe" but the text says "Lancia killed off Period"

...the band was playing Dixie: double-four time...

5 November 2009

Chrysler/Lancia as Opel/Vauxhall. Why not?

5 November 2009

-this is nothing but what was in the last report, so yes, my opinion is still the same, Fiat and Chrylser will be a great success.

-brands are assets and they are sorting the assets out and integrating the businesses, which is the way to do it, something MB did not do when it owned Chrysler and as said paid a heavy price for it.

-i think Fiat and Chrysler will be a fantastic success and you can see that integrated and focused business developing; I think its going to be great; my opinion has not changed.

5 November 2009

can't help thinking that Autocar have backed the wrong horse here. Autocar made great play of FIAT's plans to grow to a 6m unit a year outfit, which de Montezemolo saw as the threshold of viability for the world's remaining car makers, after the shake out. FIAT/Chrysler are nowhere near this - even if such a 'rule' were true - with Chrysler going backwards in the US, with only the rebound in fat truck sales helping Dodge along. It will take a minimum of five years for FIAT to start to truly integrate its products in a large scale way into the Chrysler group plants and dealer networks; 'cept they haven't got that long, nowhere near it, before the drain of resource to Chryslers' woes starts to bring down the mother company, as happened with Daimler and BMW.

Now wouldn't it be mature for Autocar's senior writers to eat some humble pie over this 6m unit year threshold nonsense and instead highlight what is a genuine, comparative success story, also in America - Ford. Where Marchionne, the superman hogs the limelight - whether it's unwanted or not - of daring corporate raids, a modest, talented engineer quietly goes about the business of turning around a much larger company. That person? - Alan Mulally, Ford's No.1.

Alan Mulally, the qualified engineer, Irish American, ex-Boeing 'quietman', who has achieved more in the last three years amongst the American Big Three and quite possibly more than almost any other auto exec in the world, with the possible exception of Winterkorn at VW group. Mulally had the smarts to flog off JLR to Tata for a great price and then set about turning around Ford's N.American ops. This guy seems to rarely get the limelight or praise he deserves. To me he proves that putting a genuine engineering type into the head of a company, over the usual lawyer/accountant bods, is a surer way of success, as evidenced by the antics of the predominantly accountancy types running GM's HQ or even Marchionne's legal-biased background and the stuttering start of the FIAT/Chrysler integration.

In fact maybe there's something in this Irish roots sh*t perhaps. The last albeit controversial, widely accepted successful US president, Ronny Reagan, had Irish roots; the guy Sir Christopher Kelly, who has finally capped off the looting of the public purse by the pig UK MPs at Westminster is presumably of Irish roots with that name and then there's Mullaly of Ford, of which the founder Henry Ford himself was the son of a Corkman. FoMoCo is back to its roots. So to conclude less 'bella Italia!' from Autocar regards auto industry role models and more 'Erin Go Bragh'!

5 November 2009

[quote richardhead]

In fact maybe there's something in this Irish roots sh*t perhaps. The last albeit controversial, widely accepted successful US president, Ronny Reagan, had Irish roots; the guy Sir Christopher Kelly, who has finally capped off the looting of the public purse by the pig UK MPs at Westminster is presumably of Irish roots with that name and then there's Mullaly of Ford, of which the founder Henry Ford himself was the son of a Corkman. FoMoCo is back to its roots. So to conclude less 'bella Italia!' from Autocar regards auto industry role models and more 'Erin Go Bragh'!

[/quote]

I'd forgotten what an economic powerhouse Ireland is. Oh wait a minutes, it isn't. Utter tosh.

Welcome back horse&cart.

5 November 2009

Interesting news. Sounds like they know what they are doing, but it will be interesting to see how the 300C and Voyager sell under a Lancia name, assuming they do bring them to the UK. I hope they make use of the existing dealer network that Dodge and Chrysler have here too.

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