Currently reading: Detroit motor show 2013: Corvette C7
The Corvette C7 is tipped to offer an aluminium twin-turbo V6 alongside traditional V8 powerplants
Autocar
News
2 mins read
19 October 2012

Pictures of the next-generation Chevrolet Corvette C7 have surfaced on the eve of the Detroit motor show. The pictures, which will appear on the covers of two American motoring magazines show the undisguised front and rear of the iconic American sportscar.

The cover of Road & Track magazine shows a significant evolution of the Corvette C7's front end with LED daytime running lights and a large grille similar to that seen on the recently-revealed SRT Viper. The more radical changes are shown by Automobile magazine, where at the rear Chevrolet has opted for square units carrying LED graphics similar to those featured on the Chevrolet Camaro.

Our spy shots, captured recently shows the overall design will be evolutionary, but will retain many of the same iconic details of the current two-seater.

It will retain its long nose, steeply raked windshield and the same flat boot lid, but Chevrolet promises some radical changes once the 2014 Corvette C7 finally hits market next year.

The basic platform for the C7 is expected to undergo some modest changes but it will remain a front-engine, rear-drive sports car. Insiders have hinted at significant weight reduction; essential for the Vette is to be regarded as a world-class driver's car. It is likely this will be achieved through use of carbonfibre panels, replacing the fibreglass parts currently used.

Insiders suggest a 5.5-litre V8 could be introduced as the entry-level engine, with a new 6.2-litre unit offered as a more upscale motor. The smaller engine is likely to feature an aluminium block, adopting higher compression and direct injection.

It is also possible Chevrolet could introduce downsized engines as part of the range. Such a move is unlikely to be adopted initially, but a twin-turbo V6 could join the latest development of the small block V8. 

The Corvette C7 will be the first to wear the latest evolution of the crossed flags logo, which are said to be more swept and angular with greater detail “showing greater depth, colour and more attention to detail”.

Paul A. Eistenstein/Stuart Milne

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NotHandMade 19 October 2012

5.5 for 2014 Le Mans Regs

 

No one realised that this is because the ACO regulations for LM GTPro and GTE are limiting engines to 5.5L from 2014 and Corvette always race.

 

johnfaganwilliams 19 October 2012

subbing

yet another plea from me for Autocar scribblers to read their bloody copy before filing.

"essential is for the Vette is to be regarded as a world-class driver's car"

what the hell does that mean? C'mon guys it takes 20 seconds.

Geordie Amanda 19 October 2012

johnfaganwilliams

johnfaganwilliams wrote:

"essential is for the Vette is to be regarded as a world-class driver's car"

what the hell does that mean? C'mon guys it takes 20 seconds.

 

You don't speak Yoda?

johnfaganwilliams 19 October 2012

Yoda

Fair point! Or is is Furbish? It's not English that's for sure.

TegTypeR 19 October 2012

Shame

It's a shame they didn't develop a right hand drive version for this car because if the previous model is anything to go by this could be a world class supercar.

Marc 19 October 2012

TegTypeR wrote: It's a shame

TegTypeR wrote:

It's a shame they didn't develop a right hand drive version for this car because if the previous model is anything to go by this could be a world class supercar.

 

It's a shame they haven't realized it's no longer the 1960's. It's about time manufacturers are forced to ditch these utterly pointless engines.

artill 19 October 2012

Marc wrote: It's a shame

Marc wrote:

It's a shame they haven't realized it's no longer the 1960's. It's about time manufacturers are forced to ditch these utterly pointless engines.

which engine(s) is pointless? the 6.2, 5.5, or new V6 turbo?

Surely the point is to produce a car the public want, and the American public want their home grown sports cars with engines like this. And so do i. 

My guess would be you have never driven a car with a large V8? They use them for a reason, they really are very good. They also happen to be very reliable and long lasting.

Marc 20 October 2012

artill wrote: Marc

artill wrote:

Marc wrote:

It's a shame they haven't realized it's no longer the 1960's. It's about time manufacturers are forced to ditch these utterly pointless engines.

which engine(s) is pointless? the 6.2, 5.5, or new V6 turbo?

Surely the point is to produce a car the public want, and the American public want their home grown sports cars with engines like this. And so do i. 

My guess would be you have never driven a car with a large V8? They use them for a reason, they really are very good. They also happen to be very reliable and long lasting.

None of the above, the point is to move the motor industry and its technology forward. Europe has been managing to do it for some time, with the exception of the likes of Ferrari, Aston Martin and in particular Landrover with their grossly overweight/engined cars. It's not  at all about what the American public want, it's about what they should have.

As I have stated before these engines are now pointless, they are nothing more than a nod to nostalgia.

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