Next generation Toyota Prius pictures surface early on the web
16 October 2008

Three images of the new Toyota Prius have leaked onto the internet ahead of the petrol-electric hybrid’s launch next year.

The pictures show that Toyota has stuck closely to the current Prius’s proportions, but that the new car has been given a sleeker, more aggressive look.

We already know that the new car is going to be bigger than the outgoing model, with Toyota insiders saying it will be about 10cm longer and 3cm wider than the second-generation Prius.

It will also get a more tightly packaged hybrid drivetrain and battery pack to further increase interior accommodation.

A bigger capacity 1.8-litre petrol engine will provide more power and still lower emissions, with the new car capable of a combined economy figure of more than 70mpg, and CO2 emissions likely to be below 90g/km.

Despite the rush of other manufacturers towards lithium-ion batteries, the new Prius will initially continue to use a version of the current car’s nickel hydride battery pack.

Toyota is determined that nothing should sully the company’s reputation for reliability, and the plan is to introduce lithium-ion batteries in 2010, after the technology has proved reliable.

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Toyota Prius

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Comments
39

16 October 2008

What an ugly lump of craap. I wish these things would just go away.

16 October 2008

Totally agree...looks rubbish and i bet it still drives like a shopping trolley...had the misfortune to drive one of these oversized batteries at the motor show, most forgettable 5 minutes of my life.

Not upgrading the batteries is hypocritical to the 'eco' cause. Not more hypocritical however than the increasing amount i see being driven in the fast lanes of the motorways nowadays...those little 1.5 l engines must be being pushed right to the extreme.

16 October 2008

I don't suppose Toyota have ever sold on looks but this is just taking the proverbial.......

Where has all Japanese design went to?

17 October 2008

Looks fine to me.

17 October 2008

"Oh no! They've done the same with the Mk 2 as well..."

Apologies to Gordon Murray or Guigaro, I've heard something similar attributed to them both. Makes a TR7 look almost pretty.

Unless they start making these things attractive and fun to drive (weight and transmission being chief culprits in this car), Toyota aren't going to sell many of them to car enthusiasts; the deluded and blinkered, who believe buying one actually makes a difference to the environment (try recycling the batteries), or people trying to bolster their "green" self image by buying one, maybe...

There was a twin test between a Prius and a Panda 100HP in a well known monthly mag last year, I would recommend reading it. Raises some very interesting points.

Go and "buy your new green wool and pull it in front of your eyes". Toyota will soon have some for a very reasonable 20 grand-ish. Mars Bar for anyone who can identify the above quote.

Guess what? It's going to be bigger and probably heavier than it's predecessor. There's nothing like progress...

17 October 2008

[quote macaroni]What an ugly lump of craap. I wish these things would just go away.[/quote] This sort of comment really adds to the debate, does it not ? Have you ever actually driven a Prius for any length of time/distance. I acknowledge that looks are down to personal preference, but in all honesty it is no better or worse than many other cars on the road.


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

17 October 2008

[quote M_Nolan]most forgettable 5 minutes of my life.[/quote] Glad to see you gave it a fair trial before reaching your conclusion. [quote M_Nolan]those little 1.5 l engines must be being pushed right to the extreme[/quote] I just don't see the relevance of this comment - are you suggesting that any 1500cc engined car should not be using the "fast lane" of the motorway ? Perhaps you should be aware that there is no such thing as the "fast lane" on a motorway, just overtaking lanes. The right-hand lanes should not be "hogged" just because one has a car with a large engine and drive faster than the other traffic.


Enjoying a Fabia VRs - affordable performance

17 October 2008

[quote jskater]Unless they start making these things attractive and fun to drive (weight and transmission being chief culprits in this car), Toyota aren't going to sell many of them to car enthusiasts; the deluded and blinkered, who believe buying one actually makes a difference to the environment[/quote] Hmm, JSkater, sounds like you're one of the blinkered and deluded. Weight isn't the reason the car isn't much fun to drive - if you bother looking it up, it's lighter than the equivalent (performance and size Focus diesel). I suspect that it's not much fun to drive because the designers had other priorities, like economy, and the clever hybrid drive train. I agree they're not much fun to drive - the electric steering is utterly devoid of feel - but criticising them for that is rather missing the point. And a twin test between a Panda and a Prius? Why do people persist with these bizarre comparisons? It never fails to amuse me that so called petrol heads seem so intolerant of change, innovation or variety and seem to want all cars to be the same. Now that would be dull.

17 October 2008

I find it funny that there are still people around desperate to bring up the "it's not green" argument every time the Prius gets any press. I bought a 2006 Prius, not because I wanted to save the environment, but because it's £11.50 per week cheaper to run on my commute into London than my Audi A3 Sportback which, incidentally, is a diesel.

That it is a relaxing, stress-free car to drive, as well as topping the JD Power 2008 customer satisfaction survey (and joint top with the Lexus IS200 in 2007) will sadly be lost on those still anxious to talk about battery recycling and end-of-life costs. Money talks; the bare fact is that car drivers will only start choosing the green option in large numbers if it is financially the cheapest.

Thus if you're prepared to look through the endless, recycled criticism of the car you'll find a machine that's exceptionally cheap to run (£15 annual road tax, an easy 55-60mpg and group 7 insurance). If you can't do that, then in a world where the cost of fuel can only rise in the long term, well, good luck to you.

17 October 2008

[quote MrTrilby]And a twin test between a Panda and a Prius? Why do people persist with these bizarre comparisons?[/quote]

It was in E** magazine last year. If you read it it may not seem as bizarre as you think. It asks some interesting questions of the Prius's "green credentials".

[quote MrTrilby]I agree they're not much fun to drive - the electric steering is utterly devoid of feel - but criticising them for that is rather missing the point.[/quote]

Surely if Toyota can engineer [quote MrTrilby]the clever hybrid drive train[/quote], then they can also give the thing some steering feel as well?

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